The Huffington Post
3 months
In conversation separate from the podcast, Packard shared how uncomfortable it was coming out in such a small, rural area. He expressed the all-too-common fears of rejection from both his community and family. Those real-life tensions, he said, seemed the perfect cinematic backdrop. “I felt it was a great way to introduce these characters, who are in the right place at the wrong time,” said Packard. “Then you get to see this gay character, that we dont always get to see in these films, be a strong, confident person by the end.” At its heart, Pitchfork is a first-time director’s nod to many of his core influences growing up. In the beginning, Packard serves a little Footloose, later offers a tongue-in-cheek homage to ‘80s John Hughes films and even sandwiches in a fully-choreographed dance scene. (Keep an eye out for the extra sexyRocky,” played by Keith Webb, formerly of Packard’s E! Network series Men of the Strip about a Las Vegas male revue.
Open Culture
3 months
They may have arrived on the scene in the 80s as one of the four horsemen of thrash metalkin to such cuddly acts as Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer—but believe or not, Metallica had some serious crossover appeal from the start. Granted, that appeal was limited to a small subset of punks and skaters who came to appreciate metal thanks to Metallica’s covers of horror-punks The Misfits on their 1987 Garage Days Revisited EP . Nonetheless, it showed that the band always had a sense of humor and an appreciation for other—albeit very closely-relatedgenres. Since then, Metallica has grown up, sometimes awkwardly. We watched them do it with the help of a therapist in the 2003 documentary Some Kind of Monster . We listened to their grown-up angst on that bummer of an album, St. Anger . That year, they also took on a fourth member, bassist Robert Trujillo, whose extra-genre affinities are broad and deep—from his love for Motown, funk, and the athletic fusion of Jaco Pastorius to his dabbling in flamenco .
Open Culture
3 months
They may have arrived on the scene in the 80s as one of the four horsemen of thrash metalkin to such cuddly acts as Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer—but believe or not, Metallica had some serious crossover appeal from the start. Granted, that appeal was limited to a small subset of punks and skaters who came to appreciate metal thanks to Metallica’s covers of horror-punks The Misfits on their 1987 Garage Days Revisited EP . Nonetheless, it showed that the band always had a sense of humor and an appreciation for other—albeit very closely-relatedgenres. Since then, Metallica has grown up, sometimes awkwardly. We watched them do it with the help of a therapist in the 2003 documentary Some Kind of Monster . We listened to their grown-up angst on that bummer of an album, St. Anger . That year, they also took on a fourth member, bassist Robert Trujillo, whose extra-genre affinities are broad and deep—from his love for Motown, funk, and the athletic fusion of Jaco Pastorius to his dabbling in flamenco .
NPR News
4 months
Open Culture
7 months
What kind of music can you expect to hear? Officially, anything that has thought behind it, but I’m starting with my experience as musician (see www.marklint.com ) and music lover growing up in the 80s and 90s listening to popular, indie, folk, punk, and progressive rock. There hare been some movement into soul (Episode 16 features the great Narada Michael Walden, who produced Whitney Houston among many others), electronica ( Gareth Mitchell ), country ( Beth Kille ), and future episodes will venture into classical, hip-hop, and world music. More typical, however (i.e. more akin to my own writing), are figures like 90s sweetheart and political activist Jill Sobule , cow-punk pioneer Jon Langford (Mekons), grunge-peddler turned symphonist Jonathan Donahue (Mercury Rev), NPR darling Chad Clark (Beauty Pill), and 80s Cutting Crew front-man Nick Eede .
Open Culture
a year
Open Culture
2 years
Their podcast Avant-Garde All the Time offers us two episodes called “The Women of the Avant-Garde,” hosted by poet Kenneth Goldsmith , who admits the survey is a corrective for the podcast’s own blind spots. Through a small but select number of poets and musicians, Goldsmith aims “to show that there are dozens and dozens of great women artists on Ubuweb”—and everywhere else art lives. Instead of a history, Goldsmith gives us something of a constellation of artists, many of them clustered tightly together in time and space. New York poets, writers, and musicians who came of age in the 70s and 80sKathy Acker , Lydia Lunch , Laurie Anderson , Patti Smith , Eileen Myles —all feature in Goldsmith’s account. Theirs was a time and place the poet Myles has described as “a moment” that was “very uncensored and really excited and it just made you feel like there was room for more.
Open Culture
2 years
In the 1980s, The Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC), an organization co-founded by Tipper Gore and the wives of several other Washington power brokers, launched a political campaign against pop music, hoping to put warning labels on records that promoted Sex, Violence, Drug and Alcohol Use. Along the way, the PMRC issued “ the Filthy Fifteen ,” a list of 15 particularly objectionable songs. Hits by Madonna, Prince and Cyndi Lauper made the list. But the list really took aim at heavy metal bands from the 80snamely, Judas Priest, Mötley Crüe, Twisted Sister, W.A.S.P., Def Leppard, Black Sabbath, and Venom. (Interesting footnote: the Soviets separately created a list of blackballed rock bands , and it looked pretty much the same.) Above, you can watch Twisted Sister’s Dee Snider appear before Congress in 1985 and accuse the PMRC of misinterpreting his band’s lyrics and waging a false war against metal music.
Mental Floss
2 years
This was followed by another five-part miniseries, G.I. Joe: The Revenge of Cobra , airing September 10 to 14, 1984, leading into the regular series, which began on September 16, 1985. The show ran for two seasons, ending in 1986, with a total of 95 episodes, and is considered by many kids of the '80s to be their definitive G.I. Joe experience. Ho, Joe!? According to Wally Burr, the voice director for the show, the Joesfamous battle cry, “Yo, Joe!” was originally written as “Ho, Joe!” by Ron Friedman, screenwriter for the two miniseries and the first story arc of the regular series. But when the actors said it, it just didnt have the weight that Burr was looking for, so he asked that they add a “y” sound in the middle to make it “Hyo, Joe!” instead. Once the writers caught on, they changed it to simplyYo, Joe” in future scripts. Though the battle cry was never used in the Marvel comic book, as the catch phrase permeated the fandom, Hama did give a nod to it by naming the Joe’s favorite soft drink, YoJoe Cola.