Open Culture
3 months
Other of the dead with whom he spoke, while they may not qualify as household names, nevertheless went to the grave with some sort of achievement under their belts: Olestra inventor Fred H. Mattson, for instance, or John Wesley Joyce, owner of the famed Greenwich Village literary watering hole The Lion’s Head. Only the Slaughterhouse-Five author’s courageous and impossible reportage has saved the names of a few, like that of retired construction worker Salvatore Biagini, from total obscurity. Famous or not, people interested Vonnegut, who claimed to get his ideas from “disgust with civilization” but also served as honorary president of the National Humanist Association. This aspect of his personality comes up in the Brian Lehrer Show segment just above , a listen back to Vonnegut’s “Reports on the Afterlifesegments for WNYC’s 90th anniversary.
Open Culture
3 months
Other of the dead with whom he spoke, while they may not qualify as household names, nevertheless went to the grave with some sort of achievement under their belts: Olestra inventor Fred H. Mattson, for instance, or John Wesley Joyce, owner of the famed Greenwich Village literary watering hole The Lion’s Head. Only the Slaughterhouse-Five author’s courageous and impossible reportage has saved the names of a few, like that of retired construction worker Salvatore Biagini, from total obscurity. Famous or not, people interested Vonnegut, who claimed to get his ideas from “disgust with civilization” but also served as honorary president of the National Humanist Association. This aspect of his personality comes up in the Brian Lehrer Show segment just above , a listen back to Vonnegut’s “Reports on the Afterlifesegments for WNYC’s 90th anniversary.
Project Censored
3 months
Peter and Mickey spend the hour with journalist and media scholar Brian Covert, discussing the too-close relationship between the CIA and U.S. media, as well as other issues, including the Obama Administration pivot toward Asia. Brian Covert is an independent journalist, and a lecturer at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan. His chapter on the CIA [...] The post Brian Covert appeared first on Project Censored .
The Huffington Post
3 months
Now 18 months later, Packard is anxious to introduce the world to his creation: Pitchfork . Written in the typical teens-getting-skewered vein of Friday the 13th and Halloween , this film carries a queer twist. After coming out, Hunter (Brian Raetz) invites a group of friends from his New York performing arts school for a weekend with his family. Unbeknownst to either the teens or his parents -- especially his less-than-supportive father -- a maniac is on the loose. With the exception of the rampaging psychopath, Packard says early elements of the film (set in his hometown of Clare, MI, and filmed on his family farm) are semi-autobiographical. “When I sat down with the writer of this film [Darryl F. Gariglio], I had all these ideas in my head. I based a lot of the events on me coming out to my family,” he shared. “I lived in New York City at the time and would always bring my friends back with me to the farm to make me feel a little more comfortable around my dad and mom.
BoingBoing
3 months
Brian from the Recommend if You Like podcast sez, "For episode 200 ( MP3 ), we sat down for a 90 minute interview with Mad Magazine's Al Jaffee, who, at the age of 95 holds the title of 'the longest working cartoonist in history.'" (more)
Social Media Examiner
4 months
The Event Chronicle
5 months
You need something to levitate the stones. You need something to soften them. You need something to cut precise flat surfaces and edges. And you need something like a plasma torch to cut holes and channels. All of these you see being used in the oldest largest megalithic sites. But if, say, the technology to levitate and soften stones was lost, but the other tech still functioned, then what you would have instead is smaller stones that could be transported by human strength but still cut and fit with laser precision, which is what you see in the Inca Temple of the Sun for example, which wasnt built by the Incas of course as the Incas came later. Anyway, to get an idea of when these things were built, there are megaliths in Japan that are pretty interesting. Brian Foerster noted that the Imperial Palace in Tokyo could be sitting atop and older megalithic site.
NPR News
7 months
Project Censored
8 months
21stCenturyWire
8 months
Den of Geek
10 months
More powerful than tommy guns, a team of lawyers put a stop to that before it got off the ground. Reportedly, these same legal issues even put the brakes on a plan by Powers creators Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Avon Oeming to kick off a new Dick Tracy comic book series (it's tough to imagine a more perfect creative team for that). In other words, the same thing that kept Dick Tracy 2 from happening, has also essentially retired the detective from any and all potential new adventures. So, not only will we never see a sequel to the 1990 film (which is probably for the best), but the prospects of seeing the iconic detective again in any new adventures appear increasingly dim. However, for those devoted fans of the movie, there are other ways to immerse yourself in the film's continuity, all of which can be considered 'official' extensions of the story.
BoingBoing
10 months
Brian Brushwood is is the creator and host of over 400 episodes of Discovery’s Scam School , with over one million subscribers on YouTube. In 2015, his first full season of Hacking the System debuted on the National Geographic Channel (now available on Netflix). Brian has performed thousands of live stage shows (appearing in every state in the continental US), headlined 3 years at Universal Orlando, and recorded two Billboard #1 comedy albums with his “Night Attackco-host, Justin Robert Young. Subscribe to the Cool Tools Show on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page Show notes: Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards “One of the most important tools in my entire career has been the Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards program. Everybody's got their own frequent flyer mileage program, but Southwest Airlines is unique, because if you hit a certain level you get to have a second person that you designate as your companion pass holder and everywhere you go that person gets to go for free.
Futurity
a year
People who suffer persistent itching without any clear cause may have previously unrecognized defects to their immune system, according to a small study. As doctors, we throw things like antihistamines, ointments, and lotions at patients who suffer chronic itching, but if there is something profoundly abnormal about the immune system—as it appears there is—then we can't solve the itching until we address those underlying causes, says principal investigator Brian S. Kim, an assistant professor of medicine in the dermatology division at Washington University in St. Louis. The immune system needs to be in balance, and we hope to find ways to restore that balance in patients with this very debilitating condition. For the study, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology , researchers took blood samples and skin biopsies from a small sample of patients—only four are reported in the study—to look for immune problems.
InfoWars Daily Podcast
a year
Bleacher Report
a year
But what about those boundary receivers? Edelman is the only known quantity on the depth chart right now. There's Aaron Dobson , who has struggled in a battle against injuries throughout the first three years of his career. He has the physical tools to be the boundary receiver the Patriots need, but it remains to be seen if he can be the kind of consistent player the Patriots want. He was competing with Brian Tyms and Brandon Gibson for a roster spot in 2015's training camp, and that could be the case once again this summer. Hogan has been a valuable contributor, but has never been a featured receiver in the way that the Patriots featured Brandon LaFell in 2014. His career highs of 41 receptions, 450 yards and four touchdowns are below the production he'll need to be a star as the boundary receiver of the future for the Patriots. Washington, on the other hand, has made an impact at various stops throughout his 11-year career; but since 2012, his per-season average of 48 receptions, 742 yards and three touchdowns indicate his status as a smaller piece to the puzzle.
Open Culture
a year
BoingBoing
a year
.. I love it because it fills a gap that's often left between personal creativity and highly technical software manuals. It kind of pays a bit of an homage to Brian Eno and his oblique strategies and that you can almost pick up anywhere when you're feeling stuck and looking for a new approach or idea. There's sort of just different sections that you can flip through. The format is set up as a collection of kind of problems and then solutions and it covers everything from basic music theory to different ways to beat procrastination, so it's both practical and kind of philosophical in a way." Oblique Strategies "[Brian Eno's Oblique Strategies] is a really favorite cool tool of mine, which is originally a deck of analog playing cards, basically, that had one short instruction on each card and you would shuffle the cards and pick one at random and when you were stuck, you would do what it said and some of those instructions were like, ignore the middle or pretend you're a robot or something to force you to take kind of a radical oblique angle on the problem.
Open Culture
a year
Open Culture
a year
Social Media Examiner
a year
The Event Chronicle
a year
Open Culture
a year
Open Culture
a year
Open Culture
a year
Contrary to popular misconceptions, Brian Wilson did not use a Moog synthesizer for the recording of “Good Vibrations” the year prior, but an “electro-thereminbuilt and played by Paul Tanner . He did, however, have Bob Moog build a replica of that instrument to play the song live. (The Moog theremin is still in production today.) Then, in 1968 Wendy Carlos used a Moog Synthesizer to reinterpret several Bach compositions, and Switched-On Bach became a novelty hit that led to many more classical Moog recordings from Carlos, as well as to her original contributions to Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange and The Shining . (Unfortunately, few of Carlosrecordings are available online, but you can hear The Shining ‘s main theme above.) Switched-On Bach took the Moog synthesizer mainstream—it was the first classical album to go platinum. (Glenn Gould called it “one of the most startling achievements of the recording industry in this generation and certainly one of the great feats in the history of keyboard performance.