Open Culture
7 days
They may have arrived on the scene in the 80s as one of the four horsemen of thrash metalkin to such cuddly acts as Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer—but believe or not, Metallica had some serious crossover appeal from the start. Granted, that appeal was limited to a small subset of punks and skaters who came to appreciate metal thanks to Metallica’s covers of horror-punks The Misfits on their 1987 Garage Days Revisited EP . Nonetheless, it showed that the band always had a sense of humor and an appreciation for other—albeit very closely-relatedgenres. Since then, Metallica has grown up, sometimes awkwardly. We watched them do it with the help of a therapist in the 2003 documentary Some Kind of Monster . We listened to their grown-up angst on that bummer of an album, St. Anger . That year, they also took on a fourth member, bassist Robert Trujillo, whose extra-genre affinities are broad and deep—from his love for Motown, funk, and the athletic fusion of Jaco Pastorius to his dabbling in flamenco .
Open Culture
9 days
They may have arrived on the scene in the 80s as one of the four horsemen of thrash metalkin to such cuddly acts as Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer—but believe or not, Metallica had some serious crossover appeal from the start. Granted, that appeal was limited to a small subset of punks and skaters who came to appreciate metal thanks to Metallica’s covers of horror-punks The Misfits on their 1987 Garage Days Revisited EP . Nonetheless, it showed that the band always had a sense of humor and an appreciation for other—albeit very closely-relatedgenres. Since then, Metallica has grown up, sometimes awkwardly. We watched them do it with the help of a therapist in the 2003 documentary Some Kind of Monster . We listened to their grown-up angst on that bummer of an album, St. Anger . That year, they also took on a fourth member, bassist Robert Trujillo, whose extra-genre affinities are broad and deep—from his love for Motown, funk, and the athletic fusion of Jaco Pastorius to his dabbling in flamenco .
WhoWhatWhy
3 months
Click HERE to Download Mp3 . Full Text Transcript: Pat : Good evening it's 8:51 on KGO. I'm Pat Thurston. So you just heard the interview Kristen Breitweiser from the 9/11 families about the new law now that it's been put into place. I've seen a number of the editorial pieces today and it's kind of funny because it does cross some political lines. But it seems to be mostly Democrats who are really staunchly opposed to allowing the 9/11 families to sue the Saudis. Holy mackerel! Russ Baker is sitting here next to me. What better person to ask about this? Hi Russ! Russ : Hey Pat, it's great to be back. Pat : So good to talk to you. So Russ' website is whowhatwhy.com . It's fabulous, it's real investigative journalism, and it's the kind of thing where you're going to read things you will not find any place else. He actually investigates things that some people take for granted and don't think you have to ask questions about.
The Event Chronicle
4 months
(OK) RichardCobra, on May 10th, 2012 you wrote that “the leader of the Archons on the physical plane has been arrested on May 5th by the Resistance Forces and taken off planet. He has crossed over to the light and is now free willingly assisting the planetary liberation process. Later on July 15, 2012 you wrote something similar that the Archon leader went to the galactic central sun so now the Cabal are worshipping something that no longer exists. The question is; is this former leader of the Archon now assisting with the planetary liberation process or does he not exist any more. COBRAHe was assisting the light forces for a short period of time but when he had realized what he had done in the past he volunteered to be disintegrated in the galactic central sun and his wish was granted. So he does not exist any more. And there are certain factions of the Cabal that are worshipping that entity without realizing that that entity does not exist any more as individual being.
NPR News
5 months
A woman touches a coffin of one of the victims of Wednesday's earthquake inside a gymnasium in Ascoli Piceno. Gregorio Borgia/AP Mourner Raphaela Baiocchi told Eleanor that "we are participating, all our pain for our population. And it's not the first time for our people." She added: "Italy is a very beautiful and dangerous place. And so we are here to share the pain today, then we will speak about other things." Things like justice, she told Eleanor. "There's a growing anger about the construction of some of the buildings that collapsed," Eleanor says. Here's more: "Granted, many are medieval but there are earthquake codes that need to be followed. For example, one bell tower rebuilt ten years ago collapsed and killed a family. And the Italian prosecutor in charge of the quake investigation said what happened can't simply be chalked up to nature.
Das Erste
5 months
SPIEGEL
5 months
NPR News
5 months
Indian political activist Irom Sharmila is taken back to a hospital after a court appearance in the state of Manipur on Tuesday, a few hours before she ended her fast. Anupam Nath/AP Irom Sharmila ate on Tuesday for the first time in nearly 16 years. The Indian activist started a hunger strike in November 2000, to protest a law that gives broad powers to security forces in her home state of Manipur. She was arrested by authorities, forcibly hospitalized and force-fed through a tube in her nose. "The Iron Lady of Manipur" continued to be force-fed until Tuesday afternoon, when a judge granted her release and — tube removed — she licked honey from her hand. "I have to change my strategy," Sharmila said, according to the BBC . "I have been fasting for 16 years and I have not got anything from it yet." Known as the "Iron Lady of Manipur," Sharmila arrives in New Delhi in March 2013, more than 12 years into her hunger strike.
The Huffington Post
6 months
NPR News
a year
And as NPR's Joel Rose has reported, the songwriters often get a far smaller share of those payments: "The way those royalties are split is far from equal, in part because there are two different types of © holders for every song a streaming service plays. One is the owner of the sound recording — that's usually the artist or the record label. The other is the person (or persons) who wrote the song, or someone else to whom rights have been granted, like a music publisher." (Rose explains in detail the legal framework that guides the music industry in a story earlier this year .) Here's a bit of background on Lowery's case from The Wrap : "The class-action suit identifies members of the class to be anyone who owns reproduction and distribution rights of ©ed songs that have been played by Spotify. Lowery has long been an advocate for artists' interests as the music business shifts its business models.
NPR News
a year
Open Culture
a year
Open Culture
a year
The Huffington Post
a year
After the cops came to the scene and cleared me to leave, I sent a follow up email to IOGCC outlining the questions I would have asked if given the opportunity to do so. Days later, IOGCC finally responded to those questions and told me its climate change stance. Well, as you'll see later, they kind of did. "Closed Business" I was no stranger to IOGCC to begin with, which exists due to an act of Congress in 1935 . Indeed, the compact had granted me a press pass to attend and cover its industry-funded extravaganza that took place in the days before. I also attended its 2014 annual meeting in Columbus, Ohio and did a 41-minute interview with Carol Booth , IOGCC's communications manager, while there. According to the Oklahoma City Police officer who arrived and held me for about seven minutes to ask me questions and do a background check on me, IOGCC had "closed business" that day, though that was neither posted on its front door nor anywhere online.
The Huffington Post
a year
" In any event, "Massive institutional racism doesn't really exist." Gara and Host wonder about the rest of the DoJ report that found the Ferguson Police Department guilty of institutional racism and all the other racially related deaths, really starting with Tryvonne Martin. While a first amendment/ACLU lawyer, Gara sees #blacklivesmatter "more as more civil disobedience than speech suppression since they've concluded it's the only way to be heard"... and it seems to be working to pressure, so far, Sanders and O'Malley, not Clinton who began her campaign with a major address on criminal justice. "Why only Democrats so far?" Gara asks. "Because the protestors don't like it when how Democrats -- that is, white progressives -- seem to have taken them for granted" and are underwhelmed that Sanders decades ago supported civil rights. There is a broad consensus around the benefit of police body cameras.
The Huffington Post
a year
" In any event, "Massive institutional racism doesn't really exist." Gara and Host wonder about the rest of the DoJ report that found the Ferguson Police Department guilty of institutional racism and all the other racially related deaths, really starting with Tryvonne Martin. While a first amendment/ACLU lawyer, Gara sees #blacklivesmatter "more as more civil disobedience than speech suppression since they've concluded it's the only way to be heard"... and it seems to be working to pressure, so far, Sanders and O'Malley, not Clinton who began her campaign with a major address on criminal justice. "Why only Democrats so far?" Gara asks. "Because the protestors don't like it when how Democrats -- that is, white progressives -- seem to have taken them for granted" and are underwhelmed that Sanders decades ago supported civil rights. There is a broad consensus around the benefit of police body cameras.
Open Culture
2 years
Mental Floss
2 years
To spare themselves more backlash, Duke was granted a stay of execution. Cobra-Lame For many fans, the film marks the point where G.I. Joejumped the shark,” moving from a fairly realistic military toyline to a more science-fiction/fantasy aesthetic with the introduction of the Cobra-la storyline. According to Product Manager Kirk Bozigian, as Hasbro was gearing up to produce the G.I. Joe movie, Joe Bacall, of Griffin-Bacall and Sunbow, expressed concerns about producing a 90-minute war movie aimed at kids. Bacall, a big science-fiction fan, suggested using a more fantastic enemy than Cobra in an effort to soften the Joe's edge. Hasbro was growing tired of Cobra Commander anyway and wanted to replace him with a new, more dynamic leader, the Cobra Emperor, Serpentor. Coincidentally, Buzz Dixon , had told Hasbro that he wanted to work up a miniseries that would tell the origin of Cobra and the rise of Cobra Commander.