BoingBoing
5 hours
For others constructs though, for your most cherished beliefs about things like climate change or vaccines or Republicans, instead of changing your mind in the face of challenging evidence or compelling counterarguments, you resist. Not only do you fight belief change for some things and not others, but if you successfully deflect such attacks, your challenged beliefs then grow stronger. The research shows that when a strong-yet-erroneous belief is challenged, yes, you might experience some temporary weakening of your convictions, some softening of your certainty, but most people rebound and not only reassert their original belief at its original strength, but go beyond that and dig in their heels, deepening their resolve over the long run. Psychologists call this the backfire effect , and this episode is the first of three shows exploring this well-documented and much-studied psychological phenomenon, one that you’ve likely encountered quite a bit lately.
Open Culture
5 days
The band may have returned to their thrash roots with 2008’s Death Magnetic and this year’s Hardwired… to Self-Destruct , but they’ll likely take a few more weird excursions (like their puzzling 2011 collaboration with Lou Reed ) in coming years. And yes, they gained a reputation as being stingy with their catalog during that whole Napster dust-up . But as you can hear James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett discuss in a recent Nerdist podcast (stream it at the bottom of this post), their “creative restlessness” has made them very appreciative of what other artists have done with their music, stretching it into alien genres and unexpected instrumentation and arrangements. In his self-deprecating way, Hetfield confesses, “there’s a lot of better versions of ‘ Nothing Else Matters ’ than ours.” Hammett agrees, and here you’ll find most of those they mention—from Scott D.
Mondoweiss
6 days
Last fall Secretary of State Kerry met privately with anti-Assad Syrian activists at the U.N. The meeting was secretly taped, and you can listen to the tape here: The New York Times got a hold of the tape back in September and wrote a story about it . So did CNN . More on their accounts later. The thrust of the conversation was the mutual frustration of Kerry and the Syrians that Bashar al-Assad was still in power and able to commit atrocities with the support of the Russians, who don't adhere to international law the way we Americans do. I'd recommend listening to the whole tape; but the conversation went something like this: The Syrians complained we aren't helping enough. Kerry and his associates said we and the Saudis and Qatar and Turkey had provided huge amounts of aid to the rebels, who unfortunately were sort of aligned with extremists.
BoingBoing
6 days
Brian from the Recommend if You Like podcast sez, "For episode 200 ( MP3 ), we sat down for a 90 minute interview with Mad Magazine's Al Jaffee, who, at the age of 95 holds the title of 'the longest working cartoonist in history.'" (more)
Open Culture
7 days
The band may have returned to their thrash roots with 2008’s Death Magnetic and this year’s Hardwired… to Self-Destruct , but they’ll likely take a few more weird excursions (like their puzzling 2011 collaboration with Lou Reed ) in coming years. And yes, they gained a reputation as being stingy with their catalog during that whole Napster dust-up . But as you can hear James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett discuss in a recent Nerdist podcast (stream it at the bottom of this post), their “creative restlessness” has made them very appreciative of what other artists have done with their music, stretching it into alien genres and unexpected instrumentation and arrangements. In his self-deprecating way, Hetfield confesses, “there’s a lot of better versions of ‘ Nothing Else Matters ’ than ours.” Hammett agrees, and here you’ll find most of those they mention—from Scott D.
BoingBoing
15 days
I just suggest people give it a shot and if they don't like them, they can send it back. It's free returns and all that stuff." Cold Saw (varies), also TechShop membership "I think this is my favorite tool of all time. I didn't even know about it until a few years ago. … It's slow, which is very perplexing. It's so slow that you can just see the individual teeth rolling around. It's like 100 RPM. It makes these perfectly smooth cuts. There's like a little burr that you can knock off with a file. It makes smooth cuts, it makes them square, it makes them fast, it's really safe. I love it. I'm not advising anyone purchase it. That's sort of the tough part with it, it's a big expensive tool. I use it at the TechShop. Part and parcel with recommending the cold saw is, get a membership to TechShop. They're in a lot of cities around the country, and you'll get access to a cold saw.
The Event Chronicle
20 days
Aaron – (I see) This seems to me like a first pre-emptive step in convincing people not to believe in things they are about to hear. In this new war on “fake news” just an effort to convince the masses that upcoming disclosures are not true? COBRAActually they are aware of the power of alternative media in all aspects. But again, they will not be able to stop this. They will actually bring more people into the alternative media. (OK thank you) (great back-fire) LynnForces for justice working within a wide network of international law enforcement and intelligence agencies have begun to arrest Europeans in high places for child abuse, trafficking and pedophilia. Despite the effort to suppress these arrests in the U.S.—by insisting the evidence is ‘fake news’—do you think the movement to arrest major figures involved in this activity in America will take hold among law enforcement agents in the U.
WhoWhatWhy
25 days
Strangelove or Apocalypse Now, he reminds us that these mostly came years after the fact, not during the actual crises when they might have affected public opinion. After years of watching films in the dark, LaSalle is unremittingly pessimistic about the cultural power of movies, or art in general. As a service to our readers, we provide transcripts with our podcasts. We try to ensure that these transcripts do not include errors. However, due to a constraint of resources, we are not always able to proofread them as closely as we would like and hope that you will excuse any errors that slipped through. Click HERE to Download Mp3 . Full Text Transcript: Jeff Schechtman: Welcome to Radio WhoWhatWhy. I'm Jeff Schechtman. During World War II, filmmakers became a part of the war effort. Filmmakers like Frank Capra, John Huston, John Ford, and William Wyler would use the experience of war to reshape how Americans view war.
BoingBoing
a month
" Todoist "A no-frills, cross-platform, web-based smart to-do list app that has the bells and whistles in the right places, like reminders and apps/integration for just about every other tool you might use."
NPR News
a month
She reached a dentist named Salem Abu al-Naser who is trapped in one of the last rebel-held neighborhoods, which he says is being pummeled with artillery, rockets and vacuum missiles. "I don't even know how to describe the kinds of things that are landing on us," he tells Alison. "These are people who love life. It's not like Aleppo is just full of a bunch of fighters or radicals," Abu al-Naser tells Alison, saying that in many cases they stay because they don't want to be homeless. "We're talking about regular people sitting in their homes," he says. "They don't want to live in refugee camps; they don't want to go to Europe. They don't want to flee." Article continues after sponsorship You can hear Alison's full report here: Horror In Aleppo: Civilians Trapped As Syrian Government Tightens Siege Listen · 3:17 3:17 Toggle more options Download Embed Embed "> iframe src="https://www.
Stack Overflow
a month
BoingBoing
a month
Back in the early 1900s, the German biologist Jakob Johann Baron von Uexküll couldnt shake the implication that the inner lives of animals like jellyfish and sea urchins must be radically different from those of humans. Uexküll was fascinated by how meaty, squishy nervous systems gave rise to perception. Noting that the sense organs of sea creatures and arachnids could perceive things that ours could not, he realized that giant portions of reality must therefore be missing from their subjective experiences, which suggested that the same was true of us. In other words, most ticks can’t enjoy an Andrew Lloyd Webber musical because, among other reasons, they dont have eyes. On the other hand, unlike ticks, most humans can’t smell butyric acid wafting on the breeze, and so no matter where you sit in the audience, smell isnt an essential (or intended) element of a Broadway performance of Cats .
WhoWhatWhy
a month
That is the scenario David Daley lays out in his bookRatf**ked: The True Story Behind the Secret Plan to Steal America’s Democracy . Daley talks to WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman about why we should be very afraid of what this legislative strategy has wrought and what it means for the future of democracy. As a service to our readers, we provide transcripts with our podcasts. We try to ensure that these transcripts do not include errors. However, due to a constraint of resources, we are not always able to proofread them as closely as we would like and hope that you will excuse any errors that slipped through. Click HERE to Download Mp3 Full Text Transcript: (Draft) Jeff Schechtman: Welcome to Radio WhoWhatWhy, I'm Jeff Schechtman. I talked to a Democratic member of Congress this morning who told me how both Democrats and Republicans were still surprised by the outcome of the recent election.
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
That is the scenario David Daley lays out in his bookRatf**ked: The True Story Behind the Secret Plan to Steal America’s Democracy . Daley talks to WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman about why we should be very afraid of what this legislative strategy has wrought and what it means for the future of democracy. As a service to our readers, we provide transcripts with our podcasts. We try to ensure that these transcripts do not include errors. However, due to a constraint of resources, we are not always able to proofread them as closely as we would like and hope that you will excuse any errors that slipped through. Click HERE to Download Mp3 The post In a 50/50 Country, the Democrats Are Shut Out From All Levers of Government appeared first on WhoWhatWhy .
NPR News
2 months
"I would rather lose than win the way you guys did," Palmieri said, her voice shaking. "No, you wouldn't," interjected Conway. "That's very clear today. No you wouldn't, respectfully." "How exactly did we win, Jen, I'd like to know?" Conway asked, though the question was clearly rhetorical, as she continued. "We did it by looking at the schedule and looking at, yes, the electoral map of 270, because that's how you win the presidency. And we went places and we were either ignored or mocked roundly by most of the people in this room. But I have a smile on my face at all times." Palmieri had been talking about the appeals to fear and division, the Muslim ban and — as one Clinton campaign operative put it — racially-tinged "dog whistles" used by Trump and his campaign. "As his presidency goes forward, I am going to be very glad to have been part of the campaign that tried to stop it," said Palmieri.
NPR News
2 months
So it's not only a lot of more industrial type of beer tradition, we also keep to our typical traditions like sour beers, for instance, lambic beers close to Brussels and of course, the famous Trappist and abbey beers. This is all part of our liquid heritage, if you want." UNESCO Deems Belgium's Beer Culture A Treasure Of Humanity Listen · 2:59 2:59 Toggle more options Download Embed Embed "> iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/503974771/503997703" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player"> In its note recognizing Belgium's beer scene , UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) wrote that while the country drinks a wide variety of beer, it's also famous for cooking with it — making everything form flavorful sauces to beer-washed cheese. Article continues after sponsorship The agency also noted the beer expertszythologists — who study and discuss the country's complex and often experimental brews.
The Event Chronicle
2 months
When the Akhenaten followers got exiled, they, like their Hyksos uncles, went north and joined their kin in Israel, Palestine, Lebanon and that area. Centuries pass and by 800 B.C. you still have the Indo-European types in the northern parts of that region and Semites in the southern parts, and when Assyria took over, the Indo-Europeans got scattered to the winds. Some of them ran off to India and formed the so-called Aryan invasion there, while the Semitic tribes got to stay in Israel/Palestine. So by the time the Old Testament was put together, it was mainly the remnant Semites who were the ones doing it. They took all of their own oral histories and the histories of people they had encountered over the past thousand years, and they rewrote history putting themselves at the center of it, and that required shifting the timeline and patching together various fragments of actual events into a fictional narrative.
The Event Chronicle
2 months
By Tom Montalk This is an expanded paraphrased transcript of my radio appearance on the Freeman show to discuss The Ark of the Covenant and Civilization . http://content.blubrry.com/freemantv/Alien_Technology_Ark_of_the_Covenant_Civilization.mp3 Click on images for further information on a topic. Introduction The past, present, and future form a continuum, so studying one part can tell us something about another part. I’m interested in history because it can tell us not only how we got here, but where we’re going. If you look at the genetic evidence for alien intervention, if you match that up with ancient accounts of the sky people or gods walking among men and flying around in chariots of fire, if you match that up with megalithic sites that are simply impossible to build with human technology of the time, and if you match THAT up with accounts of supernatural technologies like the Ark of the Covenant or various magical stones that gave off radiation and made people sick and electrocuted them and so on, well that all matches right on up with what we know in modern times about UFO s, alien, the abduction program, collaborations between black ops military and alien factions, and what eyewitnesses have said about what alien technology can do.
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
This was the cause of the rise of Fascism and Nazism in Europe, has been around because there are periods in which inequality expands and other periods where inequality is shrinking. You tend to see these phenomena in periods in history where inequality is pronounced. And unfortunately, we are in such an era now. And this is to some extent the reaction to this era. Jeff: One of the things that your research points out is the way in which the connection that moral choices, and moral philosophy, impact voting choices in ways that we might not expect. Eyal: Ideology plays substantial role in voting. Ideology is also something that connects to emotions, and to more sentiments. But it’s not coming really from the rational aspect of moral sentiment. It’s more coming from feelings as part of a tribe, feeling as part of a group identity, wanting to identify with the group that thinks like you, and belongs to your ideology.
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
And the sound recording shows up that up to 15 shots might have been fired including all the ones that missed, struck the street, and James Tague, a bystander, and so on and so on. You had mentioned during your introduction that so many people don't believe that Oswald was guilty and this is a massive change from the way it was back in 1963 and ‘64. Back then we had no evidence except what the Warren Commission released, much about which was falsified. Will we ever know the truth? I dont know if we can at this stage of the game, so many of the people involved are now dead. It's difficult to figure out all the answers. Jeff : Talk a little bit about the rush to judgment towards Oswald. Robert : Well, it appears from what we see that Oswald was set up before the shots were ever fired. He was given a job in the Texas school book depository. He would have had no way of knowing that the President’s motorcade was going to be going by the depository – this is like four and a half weeks earlier.
NPR News
2 months
S. combined. Think of it as a quantum leap for weather forecasting," says Gasparrini, who oversees the team that built GOES-R at Lockheed Martin, outside of Denver. They're now building three identical copies, predictably named GOES-S, T and U. It's a delicate operation. Fans filter air through vents in the floor and ceiling of a big warehouse. Removing a single screw takes about three people, because dropping something is not an option — once it's in low-gravity, any loose piece can float around and jam things. And everyone wears head-to-toe bodysuits that make them look like high-tech Oompa Loompas. "You may say, 'Gee, sounds like a little bit of overkill.' But these are operational satellites. We cannot have a satellite go down," says Gasparrini. "Because the last thing you want to do is get a big optical instrument up on orbit and look and there's some smudge on the lens." The GOES-R satellite is set to launch Saturday from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR .
BoingBoing
2 months
Innovation took place in the spaces between disciplines, when people outside of intellectual and professional silos, unrestrained by categorical and linear views, synthesized the work of people still trapped in those institutions, who, because of those institutions, had no idea what each other was up to and therefore couldnt predict the trajectory of even their own disciplines, much less history itself. In The Day the Universe Changed , Burke explored the sequential impact of discovery, innovation, and invention on how people defined reality itself. “You are what we know,” he wrote “and when the body of knowledge changes, so do we. In this view of change, knowledge is invented as much as it is discovered, and new ideasnibble at the edges” of common knowledge until values considered permanent and fixed fade into antiquity just like any other obsolete tool.
Max Keizer
2 months
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
The use of TV has given him skills which trumped the know-it-all opinions of people like David Brooks in the New York Times . I think American capitalism needs a kick in the pants and Trump is a kick in the pants. Everyone’s angry, gloomy; I’m none of those. Jeff Schechtman: To that extent, do you expect that ultimately what he’s going to do is going to be fundamentally different or that it’s going to even satisfy those people who were his most ardent supporters? Peter Dale Scott: Well first of all, every candidate disappoints people. I said on my Facebook page and I’ll still say it: that he will have to operate within the parameters of the deep state and that’s always been the case. Let’s go back though. I think we have to see the way in which Trump – there are insiders backing him. I think it was very interesting that he ended up with his finance chairman Steven Mnuchin.