The Huffington Post
4 months
The Huffington Post
a year
NPR News
a year
Listen to the Story Morning Edition 4:32 Playlist Download Embed Embed " /> Close embed overlay iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/464490320/464533123" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player"> "Get in line" is what William Anderson, former chairman of the Moapa Band of Paiutes, says of the current take-back-federal-lands movement. Kirk Siegler/NPR Ever since a tense, armed standoff near Cliven Bundy's Nevada ranch in 2014, a vast and sensitive piece of federal public land adjacent to the Grand Canyon has gone unmanaged and unpatrolled. It's safe to travel into the area called Gold Butte so long as you're not in a federal vehicle, according to Jaina Moan of Friends of Gold Butte, which wants to see the area federally protected. The last time there was any known federal presence was last summer, when scientists under contract with the Bureau of Land Management were camped here, gathering field research.
The Huffington Post
a year
They rapidly developed a following - and signed a contract with Warner Brothers, releasing Lemon Tree in 1962, followed by Pete Seeger's If I Had a Hammer . The trio's first album, Peter, Paul & Mary , remained in the top ten for ten months, in the top twenty for two years - and sold more than two million copies. In 1963, they released Bob Dylan's Blowin' in the Wind - which sold another million copies. Peter educates a new generation on the importance of singing together to create the sense of community necessary for social change. Credit: Marietta College/Diane Bruno. That same year, Peter, Paul & Mary appeared on stage with Martin Luther King at the historic March on Washington - where they sang Blowin' in the Wind , establishing it as a Civil Rights anthem. Peter, of course, wrote many of the group's best known songs, including Puff, Day is Done, The Great Mandala - and one of my favorites, Light One Candle.
BoingBoing
a year
Science fiction titan Ian McDonald's forthcoming novel Luna: New Moon is the subject of the latest installment of the always-great Coode Street podcast ( MP3 ). From my forthcoming review of Luna: New Moon : Luna has no government: it has contracts. You get to the moon by entering into a contract with the Lunar Development Corporation -- the nice folks who'll be selling you your air, bandwidth, carbon and water for the rest of your life -- and everything you do afterwards is also contractual: marriage, employment, and, of course, criminal redress. If you're murdered, your family will contract with a private court to adjudicate the damages they're owed for your death. If you want to get a divorce, you'll have to get a lawyer to argue your case in front of a private judge, and if you're lucky, your lawyer will challenge the opposite party to personal combat.