Open Culture
3 months
They may have arrived on the scene in the 80s as one of the four horsemen of thrash metalkin to such cuddly acts as Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer—but believe or not, Metallica had some serious crossover appeal from the start. Granted, that appeal was limited to a small subset of punks and skaters who came to appreciate metal thanks to Metallica’s covers of horror-punks The Misfits on their 1987 Garage Days Revisited EP . Nonetheless, it showed that the band always had a sense of humor and an appreciation for other—albeit very closely-relatedgenres. Since then, Metallica has grown up, sometimes awkwardly. We watched them do it with the help of a therapist in the 2003 documentary Some Kind of Monster . We listened to their grown-up angst on that bummer of an album, St. Anger . That year, they also took on a fourth member, bassist Robert Trujillo, whose extra-genre affinities are broad and deep—from his love for Motown, funk, and the athletic fusion of Jaco Pastorius to his dabbling in flamenco .
Open Culture
3 months
They may have arrived on the scene in the 80s as one of the four horsemen of thrash metalkin to such cuddly acts as Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer—but believe or not, Metallica had some serious crossover appeal from the start. Granted, that appeal was limited to a small subset of punks and skaters who came to appreciate metal thanks to Metallica’s covers of horror-punks The Misfits on their 1987 Garage Days Revisited EP . Nonetheless, it showed that the band always had a sense of humor and an appreciation for other—albeit very closely-relatedgenres. Since then, Metallica has grown up, sometimes awkwardly. We watched them do it with the help of a therapist in the 2003 documentary Some Kind of Monster . We listened to their grown-up angst on that bummer of an album, St. Anger . That year, they also took on a fourth member, bassist Robert Trujillo, whose extra-genre affinities are broad and deep—from his love for Motown, funk, and the athletic fusion of Jaco Pastorius to his dabbling in flamenco .
Techradar
5 months
£4.18/US$5 (around AU$6.73) monthly subscription Netflix is the king of video streaming subscription services, but it's not the only option and nor are you limited to other big names like Amazon and Hulu. There are also smaller options that carve out their own niche and IndieFlix is one such service. Its focus on independent films means you won't see much crossover with the larger services and rather than getting the big blockbusters you'll be discovering new things you may never have heard of. There's also a large selection of shorts, which are handy if you don't have time for a full movie. Otherwise it's a lot like Netflix. You can stream content on a wide variety of devices and while its selection isn't the largest around, with over 8,000 titles there's still more than you could get through in a lifetime. The app is easy to navigate too and while it's not free you do get a 30-day free trial, so give it a shot if you're looking for a new addition to your streaming arsenal.
NPR News
a year
' " As Poehler pointed out, in all seriousness, the fan bases for the two movies are different: "I know this is crazy, but there might be some people who aren't interested in Star Wars ." Fey chimed in, "I don't think so." Still, Poehler and Fey hope to get some crossover, and are urging fans to tweet #YouCanSeeThemBoth. They are. Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/ .
MobileNations
a year
Mental Floss
2 years
The comic was also spun-off into G.I. Joe: Special Missions , a 28-issue series that featured stand-alone stories told outside the regular seriescanon, as well as 18 issues of G.I. Joe: European Missions , which were reprints of the British Action Force comics. There were a few limited series as well, including the four-issue Order of Battle , a comic book version of the file cards found on the back of the action figure packaging, as well as a crossover with Hasbro’s other big property in G.I. Joe and the Transformers . To help new readers catch up, many of the early issues were republished as Tales of G.I. Joe and in G.I. Joe Comics Magazine . Finally, in 1995, G.I. Joe Special was a one-shot reprint of issue #61, featuring the original artwork by Todd McFarlane. The art had been deemed unacceptable when he first drew it, but after McFarlane helped to revitalize Spider-Man and founded Image Comics, it was suddenly deemed acceptable for publication.