BoingBoing
8 days
Brian from the Recommend if You Like podcast sez, "For episode 200 ( MP3 ), we sat down for a 90 minute interview with Mad Magazine's Al Jaffee, who, at the age of 95 holds the title of 'the longest working cartoonist in history.'" (more)
The Event Chronicle
9 days
Media Monarchy
15 days
Open Culture
15 days
http://s71.podbean.com/pb/30df7ce173a973b46f129093fdf6543a/586c8a23/data1/fs60/697911/uploads/HoP_171___Golden_Ages___The_Later_Eastern_Traditions.mp3 We post copious resources for the study of philosophy on this site, such that you can obtain a full college-level survey understanding of the subject on your own by taking the many free classes , listening to the many free lectures and podcasts, and reading the many free texts, ebooks and commentaries you’ll find here. But several of our posts have met with a similar reader objection: where is the Eastern philosophy? The question could also be put to almost any academic department of philosophy. One answer I’ve often heard dismisses it altogether. Philosophy, some say, developed in the West, first in ancient Greece, then in Rome, the succeeding Christian empire, and the secular age that followed.
BoingBoing
17 days
I think almost every location has one. ... I really suggest to anyone, even if you don't feel you're proficient with metal working or tools or anything, get a membership to TechShop." Propane Torch ($20) "I was a small part of a Battle Bots team behind the robot Complete Control that was on Battle Bots recently on ABC. This $20 propane torch was on a robot. It was heralded as — I'm gonna sort of humble brag here — it was heralded as the most effective flame thrower in Battle Bots history because it recorded the first robot kill ever, which was really exciting for us. There's a Youtube video of it. A minute and a half into the match, we get the robot in the gripper. We grab under the robot, lift them up, and then turn on the flame thrower. It's a 3,000 degree torch, it's coming from just a regular propane tank. The brilliance of this Harbor Freight tool is someone engineered it and figured out how to have it properly aspiratedIt turns out just with a few little tweaks, including this spark gap generator, it became a robot killer.
Scientific American - Latest
19 days
Media Monarchy
20 days
Ministry of truth, almanac of death and the 808 + this day in history w/Saddam executed and our song of the day by Bonnie Raitt on your Morning Monarchy for December 30, 2016.
The Event Chronicle
22 days
(OK) AaronCould you please give us an update on the progress of the mission regarding the Syrian Pentagram region. COBRAThere was progress at the same time there were gains and there were losses. Light Forces have captured Aleppo and have lost Palmyra. I cannot speak about the reasons yet why they have lost Palmyra but I might release that soon, depending on the situation. There is a very specific reasons why they have lost Palmyra. AaronShould we re-start visualizing the piece of ancient Halafian pottery rotating over the whole Syria pentagram? COBRAYes, that would be very recommended. (OK thank you) AaronCobra in regards to the History of CHINA: These are questions about the Hongmen, which is a secret society of China. Can you tell us if there is a relationship between the Hongmen and Freemasons and what is it? COBRAActually some people called them the Chinese Free masons.
Washingtons Blog
23 days
Informed Comment
a month
Torture has a long history, and despite being prohibited worldwide (in 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations inserted the prohibition against torture in the landmark Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the use of torture appears to be increasing worldwide. The reason for this is unclear, but the current threat from international terrorism is severe or high in many countries . So, when dealing with those who threaten our security and who appear committed to withholding information, the pressure to get results is significant. The most commonly cited reason for justifying torture is the hypotheticalticking time bombscenario. Here, a terrorist knows where a bomb is concealed, and when it will go off. If the bomb goes off, then thousands of people will be killed and injured. So torture in such a circumstance is argued as appropriate because the ends justify the means.
BoingBoing
2 months
5 years ago, Boing Boing described James Gleick’s The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood as "a jaw-dropping tour de force history of information theory... The Information isn't just a natural history of a powerful idea; it embodies and transmits that idea, it is a vector for its memes (as Dawkins has it), and it is a toolkit for disassembling the world. It is a book that vibrates with excitement, and it transmits that excited vibration with very little signal loss. It is a wonder." (more)
NPR News
2 months
The Event Chronicle
2 months
When the Akhenaten followers got exiled, they, like their Hyksos uncles, went north and joined their kin in Israel, Palestine, Lebanon and that area. Centuries pass and by 800 B.C. you still have the Indo-European types in the northern parts of that region and Semites in the southern parts, and when Assyria took over, the Indo-Europeans got scattered to the winds. Some of them ran off to India and formed the so-called Aryan invasion there, while the Semitic tribes got to stay in Israel/Palestine. So by the time the Old Testament was put together, it was mainly the remnant Semites who were the ones doing it. They took all of their own oral histories and the histories of people they had encountered over the past thousand years, and they rewrote history putting themselves at the center of it, and that required shifting the timeline and patching together various fragments of actual events into a fictional narrative.
The Event Chronicle
2 months
By Tom Montalk This is an expanded paraphrased transcript of my radio appearance on the Freeman show to discuss The Ark of the Covenant and Civilization . http://content.blubrry.com/freemantv/Alien_Technology_Ark_of_the_Covenant_Civilization.mp3 Click on images for further information on a topic. Introduction The past, present, and future form a continuum, so studying one part can tell us something about another part. I’m interested in history because it can tell us not only how we got here, but where we’re going. If you look at the genetic evidence for alien intervention, if you match that up with ancient accounts of the sky people or gods walking among men and flying around in chariots of fire, if you match that up with megalithic sites that are simply impossible to build with human technology of the time, and if you match THAT up with accounts of supernatural technologies like the Ark of the Covenant or various magical stones that gave off radiation and made people sick and electrocuted them and so on, well that all matches right on up with what we know in modern times about UFO s, alien, the abduction program, collaborations between black ops military and alien factions, and what eyewitnesses have said about what alien technology can do.
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
This was the cause of the rise of Fascism and Nazism in Europe, has been around because there are periods in which inequality expands and other periods where inequality is shrinking. You tend to see these phenomena in periods in history where inequality is pronounced. And unfortunately, we are in such an era now. And this is to some extent the reaction to this era. Jeff: One of the things that your research points out is the way in which the connection that moral choices, and moral philosophy, impact voting choices in ways that we might not expect. Eyal: Ideology plays substantial role in voting. Ideology is also something that connects to emotions, and to more sentiments. But it’s not coming really from the rational aspect of moral sentiment. It’s more coming from feelings as part of a tribe, feeling as part of a group identity, wanting to identify with the group that thinks like you, and belongs to your ideology.
NPR News
2 months
Most high school students accept photographs as presented, without verifying them. The researchers showed high school students a photograph of strange-looking flowers , posted on the image hosting site Imgur by a user named "pleasegoogleShakerAamerpleasegoogleDavidKelly. The caption read "Fukushima Nuclear Flowers: Not much more to say, this is what happens when flowers get nuclear birth defects." More than 80 percent of middle schoolers believed that "sponsored content" was a real news story. Sam Wineburg , a professor of education and history at Stanford University and the lead author of the study, spoke to NPR on Tuesday. "The photograph had no attribution. There was nothing that indicated that it was from anywhere," he said. "We asked students, 'Does this photograph provide proof that the kind of nuclear disaster caused these aberrations in nature?' And we found that over 80 percent of the high school students that we gave this to them had an extremely difficult time making that determination.
NPR News
2 months
Most high school students accept photographs as presented, without verifying them. The researchers showed high school students a photograph of strange-looking flowers , posted on the image hosting site Imgur by a user named "pleasegoogleShakerAamerpleasegoogleDavidKelly. The caption read "Fukushima Nuclear Flowers: Not much more to say, this is what happens when flowers get nuclear birth defects." More than 80 percent of middle schoolers believed that "sponsored content" was a real news story. Sam Wineburg , a professor of education and history at Stanford University and the lead author of the study, spoke to NPR on Tuesday. "The photograph had no attribution. There was nothing that indicated that it was from anywhere," he said. "We asked students, 'Does this photograph provide proof that the kind of nuclear disaster caused these aberrations in nature?' And we found that over 80 percent of the high school students that we gave this to them had an extremely difficult time making that determination.
BoingBoing
2 months
In this episode of the YANSS Podcast, we sit down with legendary science historian James Burke, who returns to the show to explain his newest project, a Connections app that will allow anyone to search and think connectively when exploring Wikipedia. He launched the Kickstarter for the app this month. This is a link to learn more . DownloadiTunesStitcherRSSSoundcloud For much of his career, science historian James Burke has been creating documentaries and writing books aimed at helping us to make better sense of the enormous amount of information that he predicted would one day be at our fingertips. In Connections , he offered an “alternate view of history” in which great insights took place because of anomalies and mistakes, because people were pursuing one thing, but it lead somewhere surprising or was combined with some other object or idea they could never have imagined by themselves.
NPR News
2 months
On both days, the moon will rise around sunset. "The difference in distance from one night to the next will be very subtle, so if it's cloudy on Sunday, go out on Monday," says Noah Petro , deputy project scientist for NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. "Any time after sunset should be fine. Since the moon is full, it'll rise at nearly the same time as sunset, so I'd suggest that you head outside after sunset, or once it's dark and the moon is a bit higher in the sky." Article continues after sponsorship The moon will reach its orbital perigee shortly before sunrise Monday, at 6:22 a.m. EST; it'll officially become full at 8:52 a.m. EST. What's With That Name? "It's a recent term to enter pop culture," Jackie Faherty says of the supermoon label. She's an astronomer at the American Museum of Natural History. Closest Supermoon Since 1948 Arrives Monday: Tips On Seeing And Photographing It Listen · 3:55 3:55 Toggle more options Download Embed Embed "> iframe src="https://www.
The Huffington Post
2 months
NPR News
3 months
At the time, the case was referred to Pakistan's Federal Investigation Agency — which reportedly arrested Gula Wednesday. Gula was around 12 years old when her image became the most famous National Geographic cover in the magazine's history. At the time, she was living in a refugee camp near Peshawar, Pakistan. Gula and other relatives had fled Afghanistan after a Soviet airstrike killed her parents — and her story resurfaced in 2002 , when National Geographic photographer Steve McCurry managed to track her down. "For a young girl who was not only a refugee but an orphan, who was sort of anonymous — she really fell between the cracks of society there," McCurry told NPR last year. Woman From Famous Afghan Girl' Photo Is Arrested In Pakistan Listen · 3:56 3:56 Toggle more options Download Embed Embed "> iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499441502/499451575" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player"> Responding to the news of Gula's arrest Wednesday, McCurry wrote on Facebook : "We are doing everything we can to get the facts by contacting our colleagues and friends in the area.
Open Culture
3 months
Image by Michiel Hendryckx, via Wikimedia Commons A peek at the photos on a realtor’s listing for a New York City one bedroom apartment formerly occupied by Beat poet Allen Ginsberg is a dispiriting reminder of how much the East Village has changed. And that listing is over six years old! Daniel Maurer , the editor of Bedford + Bowery , and a Ginsberg fan whom history has compelled to take over a portion of his hero’s formerly sprawling digs, wrote amusingly of shoddy renovations and his upstairs neighbor, punk rock icon Richard Hell : Orlovsky’s name is still on the mailbox – which is just about the only thing still around from his day. After his death, the place was gut renovated with luxurious modern amenities like a mini fridge that comes up to mid-thigh and a stove that’s so tiny and ineffectual I just use it for cookbook storage. Soon after I moved in I took a trip to Ikea and recognized my kitchen cabinets there.
Open Culture
3 months
Image by via Wikimedia Commons It’s been a humanist truism for some time to say that Shakespeare speaks to every age, transcending his time and place through the sheer force of his universal genius. But any honest student first encountering the plays will tell you differently, as will many a seasoned scholar who works hard to place the writer and his work in historical context. Even onetime director of London’s National Theatre, Nicholas Hytner, once said , “I’ll admit that I hardly ever go to a performance of one of Shakespeare’s plays without experiencing blind panic during the first five minutes. I sit there thinking… I have no idea what these people are talking about.” Of course, none of that means we can’t learn to appreciate Shakespeare, and we do not need a graduate-level education to do so. But much of his archaic language and obscure references will always sound foreign to modern ears.
WhoWhatWhy
3 months
It's typically–I don't see its corporations but–its circles of individuals, very wealthy, very powerful individuals and they are just typically what you might called right-wing, very conservative. They are pretty tough customers and they made their money and consolidate their power ruthlessly. That's how they work. They view governments as a tool when necessary if their reform is to be neutralized and otherwise to be deployed in advantageous ways. A real history course of our country is one of using the military, the spy agencies, and so on. To intervene on behalf of private interests all over the world, this has been going on from the beginning. Pat : As you talking, one of the things that the stories that keeps coming to my mind is the weapons inspectors. The UN weapons inspectors were in Iraq and Saddam Hussein was concerned and accused them of having US spies there.