The Huffington Post
7 days
For the two seasons of Brooke Knows Best , Glenn Douglas Packard encouraged Hulk Hogan’s baby girl to pursue her dreams of stardom. They were goals he knew well, having already conquered the dance world through his Emmy-nominated choreography. The multi-talented Packard says there was one long-time love, though, which took years to tackle. “I have always done lectures and talked about everybody always following their passions and doing what they love,” said Packard. “One of my passions happened to be horror and horror films.” For years, Packard’s love of scary movies took a backseat to other pursuits, namely dance. Told as a child he might never walk again, the Michigan native not only did, he became one of the entertainment industry’s most sought-after choreographers. By the time he landed the VH1 reality series gig as Brooke Hogan’s gay best friend and roommate, his resume was brimming with success.
Open Culture
8 days
They may have arrived on the scene in the 80s as one of the four horsemen of thrash metalkin to such cuddly acts as Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer—but believe or not, Metallica had some serious crossover appeal from the start. Granted, that appeal was limited to a small subset of punks and skaters who came to appreciate metal thanks to Metallica’s covers of horror-punks The Misfits on their 1987 Garage Days Revisited EP . Nonetheless, it showed that the band always had a sense of humor and an appreciation for other—albeit very closely-relatedgenres. Since then, Metallica has grown up, sometimes awkwardly. We watched them do it with the help of a therapist in the 2003 documentary Some Kind of Monster . We listened to their grown-up angst on that bummer of an album, St. Anger . That year, they also took on a fourth member, bassist Robert Trujillo, whose extra-genre affinities are broad and deep—from his love for Motown, funk, and the athletic fusion of Jaco Pastorius to his dabbling in flamenco .
Open Culture
10 days
They may have arrived on the scene in the 80s as one of the four horsemen of thrash metalkin to such cuddly acts as Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer—but believe or not, Metallica had some serious crossover appeal from the start. Granted, that appeal was limited to a small subset of punks and skaters who came to appreciate metal thanks to Metallica’s covers of horror-punks The Misfits on their 1987 Garage Days Revisited EP . Nonetheless, it showed that the band always had a sense of humor and an appreciation for other—albeit very closely-relatedgenres. Since then, Metallica has grown up, sometimes awkwardly. We watched them do it with the help of a therapist in the 2003 documentary Some Kind of Monster . We listened to their grown-up angst on that bummer of an album, St. Anger . That year, they also took on a fourth member, bassist Robert Trujillo, whose extra-genre affinities are broad and deep—from his love for Motown, funk, and the athletic fusion of Jaco Pastorius to his dabbling in flamenco .
WhoWhatWhy
a month
But you don't see it like the way we see it now. To the extent of it, it's almost an – The thing is, it's no longer to create a sense of fear. It's almost to create a sense of excitement or spectacle. It's not to create horror. It is to create like excitement and anticipation. I don't know. I'm not a psychologist but I look at it and I do the reverse on it. I imagine if other cultures were sending us this kind of product. I’d start wondering about the sanity of these people. Jeff: You mentioned Italy before. It's a little like Roman circuses. It's a little like what went on in the Coliseum before the fall of the Roman Empire. Mick: Wow. Yes, that’s interesting. But, you know that it's going to get worse. I mean, as the Romans left the Republican era and went into the Empire era, the spectacle got more and more intense. So...yes, by that analogy, I hope movies don't get worse in the next few years.
NPR News
a month
Syrian pro-government forces stand amidst the rubble in old Aleppo's Jdeideh neighborhood on Friday. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images Civilians are trying to flee a tightening siege in the rebel-held parts of Syria's northern city of Aleppo, as government forces and their Russian allies continue to seize territory as they try to take full control of the city. They're taking aim at the final major urban area still held by rebel forces. A new U.N. report suggests that hundreds of men have disappeared upon entering government-controlled areas of the city. The men are being separated from women and children , the report states , and "family members say they lost contact with the men, between the ages of 30 and 50, after they fled opposition-controlled areas of Aleppo around a week or ten days ago." Middle East Syrian Regime Forces Advance Into Rebel-Held Areas Of Aleppo Many other residents have chosen to stay or are trapped in the remaining few neighborhoods that rebels have held, as NPR's Alison Meuse reports on Morning Edition .
Hackaday
2 months
1 MHz. [B Arnold] doesn't mention the call sign, but it might have been KFTK out of St. Louis, Missouri; in any case, it would be helpful to know the range from the transmitter to the inadvertent receiver. Two low-fidelity audio clips are included below for your listening pleasure you'll want your headphones on, and Sample 2 is better than Sample 1 as are photos of the offending circuit. What do you think is going on here? We've heard of RF coupling of AM radio stations before, but how would FM signals be making it into this circuit and out of the speaker? Is there anything [B Arnold] did wrong to get this result? Sound off in the comments and let us know your horror stories of RF coupling. Sample 1: https://hackadaycom.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/sample-1.mp3 Sample2: https://hackadaycom.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/sample-2.mp3 Fail of the Week is a Hackaday column which celebrates failure as a learning tool.
21stCenturyWire
3 months
The Huffington Post
5 months
Let's not mince words about this: The Vampire's Coffin is a goofy movie, a Mexican horror-fest with rubber bats, balsa wood coffins, poorly choreographed fight scenes, and a "hero" (the star of The Brainiac , actually) who caps off practically every scene by coming close to wetting his pants. It also happens to be a surprisingly good-looking film, with cinematographer Victor Herrera ripping whole reams from the German expressionist playbook for his set up. Which makes for an unusual ToB episode in which Andrea Lipinski, Kevin Lauderdale, Orenthal Hawkins, and Dan Persons explore the paradox between production and content as much as they explore the film's copious flaws. Click on the player to hear the show, or right-click the link to download. Click on the player to hear the show, or right-click the title to download. Temple of Bad: The Vampire's Coffin Need your screams 24/7? Check out The Monster Channel Also available on Roku! -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms.
The Huffington Post
5 months
Let's not mince words about this: The Vampire's Coffin is a goofy movie, a Mexican horror-fest with rubber bats, balsa wood coffins, poorly choreographed fight scenes, and a "hero" (the star of The Brainiac , actually) who caps off practically every scene by coming close to wetting his pants. It also happens to be a surprisingly good-looking film, with cinematographer Victor Herrera ripping whole reams from the German expressionist playbook for his set up. Which makes for an unusual ToB episode in which Andrea Lipinski, Kevin Lauderdale, Orenthal Hawkins, and Dan Persons explore the paradox between production and content as much as they explore the film's copious flaws. Click on the player to hear the show, or right-click the link to download. Click on the player to hear the show, or right-click the title to download. Temple of Bad: The Vampire's Coffin Need your screams 24/7? Check out The Monster Channel Also available on Roku! -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms.
Wired
7 months
The Huffington Post
10 months
Soooo much to cover in one, brief segment! First, I look at the French animated film April and the Extraordinary World , and how it takes on the genre of steampunk in a way few steampunkers dare to consider. Then I have some belated thoughts on the entertaining comic book movie, Deadpool , and highlight a standout performance in the gory Turkish(!) horror film, Baskin . Finally, I celebrate the documentary that celebrates the artist Chet Zar, I Like to Paint Monsters , and alert retro-horror fans to the delights of a new homevid collection, The American Horror Project, Volume 1 . Then it's time for light lunch, but that's outside of your realm of interest, isn't it? Click on the player button to hear the segment; right-click the link to download, and in all cases, SPEAK OUT AGAINST TRUMP . Hour of the Wolf: April and the Extraordinary World Listen to Hour of the Wolf, now streaming Wednesday nights @ 1:30 AM on WBAI 99.
Wired
a year
The Huffington Post
a year
(Sung to the tune of Maniac ): A Satanist who can zip out of chains. He is suave, and he's smart, and clumsy. He gropes all the chicks, and eats his victim's brains, Everybody says he's eeeee-vil. He gets burned at the stake, but is feeling no pain. He knows it's just a matter of time, Three hundred years in fact, that he's coming right back, To suck out brains with his big, floppy tongue. He can freeze you with a look, But you'll just look like a schnook, 'Cause you should have known by now: He's a Brainiac, Brainiac with some style, And to eat your brains is the thing that makes him smile. He's a Brainiac, Brainiac who's intense, And his vengeance really don't make no damn sense. Yes, in a long-delayed but well-worth-waiting-for Temple of Bad, Orenthal Hawkins (who brainstormed the soulful ballad above), Andrea Lipinski, Kevin Lauderdale, and Dan Persons take on the goofy Mexican horror film, The Brainiac .
TIME - Top Stories
a year
And it's a little more like a horror film to me, there's some really horrific stuff going on as we get closer to Halo 5 . Season two, which will be shorter than season one but with longer episodes, picks up shortly after the events of season one, and deals with the implications of Ben's tectonic revelations, this time with FERO in the driver's seat. Whatever happened to sever communications with the Halo -verse's outer colonies during season oneclearly portending what we'll be grappling with in Halo 5 season two is about the trials and tribulations FERO undergoes to expose what she knows to the rest of the world. Speculation about who FERO might be runs the gamut. Is she Ilsa Zane, a supersoldier-turned-insurrectionist who appeared in a Halo -related comic book? Perhaps Dr. Catherine Halsey, the very scientist who created Master Chief? Gavankar tells me we'll find out soon enough.
Open Culture
a year
Open Culture
a year
Open Culture
a year
Horror writer Howard Phillips Lovecraft was a man who lived his life in fear—of people of other races and nationalities, of women, of reality itself. In a recent New York Review of Books write-up , Charles Baxter somewhat derisively characterizes Lovecraft as a disenchanted adolescent (and favorite of disenchanted adolescents), who “never really grew up. ‘Adulthood is hell,’ he once wrote in a letter.” Yet his fiction depicts more than a tormented adult world, but an entire universe brimming with nameless ancient horrors—and occasionally named ones like the creature Cthulhu, whose likeness he once sketched out in a letter to a friend . The cephalopod-faced monster crystalizes Lovecraft’s disgust with reality in all its strangeness and, for him, all its variety. It’s a perfect image of alienation (just this past week we saw tongue-in-cheek speculation over whether octopuses are aliens ; a plausible conceit) and presents us with an elemental uncanniness that characterizes his entire body of work.
The Huffington Post
2 years
You can be forgiven. If your first thought when you hear the phrase, "found-footage mockumentary" is a sincere wish that somebody should have released a Web virus long ago to wipe every copy of The Blair Witch Project off every server on Earth, that's certainly understandable. So I'm aware of the risk I'm taking by going on record to say that The Midnight Swim - a moody, enigmatic found-footage ghost story about three sisters discovering the ominous mystery surrounding the lake that claimed their mother's life -- demonstrates there's still something new and moving to be discovered in this debased genre. Click on the player to hear my review for WBAI 99.5FM's Hour of the Wolf, or right-click the link to download. Hour of the Wolf Movie Review of The Midnight Swim LISTEN TO HOUR OF THE WOLF EVERY THURSDAY MORNING AT 1:30 AM ON WBAI 99.5FM IN NEW YORK CITY AND LIKE THE SHOW ON FACEBOOK -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms.
The Huffington Post
2 years
No life is forever, not even that of the man who played immortal vampires, mouldering corpses, and psychotic satanists. Christopher Lee had so permanently placed his mark on the world of fantastic film that his death this past week sent a shock wave through film fandom, so assured were we that he'd always be around to bring his wit, gravity, and class to the likes of Dracula, Saruman and Kharis. In the wake of his loss, Cinefantastique contributors Ted Newsom, Steve Biodrowski, Lawrence French, and Dan Persons got together to reminisce about encounters with the legendary actor, share some famous and not-so-famous anecdotes about his work and life, and evaluate his contribution to the worlds of horror and fantasy. Click on the player to hear the show, or right-click the link to download. Download Cinefantastique Spotlight's Tribute to Christopher Lee LIKE CINEFANTASTIQUE ONLINE ON FACEBOOK -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms.