BoingBoing
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This is the first of three You Are Not So Smart episodes about the "backfire effect." In it, I interview a team of neuroscientists who put people in a brain scanner and then challenged their beliefs, some political and some not, with counter-evidence and then compared which brain regions lit up for which beliefs. The crazy takeaway was that for political beliefs, but not for others, people seemed to react as if their very bodies were being threatened by the challenging evidence. We dont treat all of our beliefs the same. If you learn that the Great Wall of China isnt the only man-made object visible from space, and that, in fact, it’s actually very difficult to see the Wall compared to other landmarks, you update your model of reality without much fuss. Some misconceptions we give up readily, replacing them with better information when alerted to our ignorance.
Slate
5 hours
InfoWars Daily Podcast
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InfoWars Daily Podcast
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The Huffington Post
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In conversation separate from the podcast, Packard shared how uncomfortable it was coming out in such a small, rural area. He expressed the all-too-common fears of rejection from both his community and family. Those real-life tensions, he said, seemed the perfect cinematic backdrop. “I felt it was a great way to introduce these characters, who are in the right place at the wrong time,” said Packard. “Then you get to see this gay character, that we dont always get to see in these films, be a strong, confident person by the end.” At its heart, Pitchfork is a first-time director’s nod to many of his core influences growing up. In the beginning, Packard serves a little Footloose, later offers a tongue-in-cheek homage to ‘80s John Hughes films and even sandwiches in a fully-choreographed dance scene. (Keep an eye out for the extra sexyRocky,” played by Keith Webb, formerly of Packard’s E! Network series Men of the Strip about a Las Vegas male revue.
InfoWars Daily Podcast
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WhoWhatWhy
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Dorothy Kilgallen was one of the most powerful voices in America. She had a role on the popular TV show, “What’s My Line,” and she was a journalist who wrote an insightful gossip column. She especially loved covering high profile murder trials. In fact, she singlehandedly caused Sam Shepard's murder conviction to be overturned by the US Supreme Court. More important, she was excellent at investigating. She asked incisive — even dangerousquestions. This may have led to her death on November 8, 1965. Kilgallen jumped at the chance to cover the trial of Jack Ruby, the man who shot and killed alleged JFK assassin Lee Harvey Oswald in a Dallas police station. As the New York Post put it , covering that trial would put her on a path that ended with her body being foundsitting up in bed, naked under a blue bathrobe, with the makeup, false eyelashes and floral hair accessory” she had worn for her TV appearance the night before.
Social Media Examiner
4 days
Open Culture
5 days
The band may have returned to their thrash roots with 2008’s Death Magnetic and this year’s Hardwired… to Self-Destruct , but they’ll likely take a few more weird excursions (like their puzzling 2011 collaboration with Lou Reed ) in coming years. And yes, they gained a reputation as being stingy with their catalog during that whole Napster dust-up . But as you can hear James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett discuss in a recent Nerdist podcast (stream it at the bottom of this post), their “creative restlessness” has made them very appreciative of what other artists have done with their music, stretching it into alien genres and unexpected instrumentation and arrangements. In his self-deprecating way, Hetfield confesses, “there’s a lot of better versions of ‘ Nothing Else Matters ’ than ours.” Hammett agrees, and here you’ll find most of those they mention—from Scott D.
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InfoWars Daily Podcast
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MarketingProfs
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BoingBoing
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Brian from the Recommend if You Like podcast sez, "For episode 200 ( MP3 ), we sat down for a 90 minute interview with Mad Magazine's Al Jaffee, who, at the age of 95 holds the title of 'the longest working cartoonist in history.'" (more)
Open Culture
7 days
The band may have returned to their thrash roots with 2008’s Death Magnetic and this year’s Hardwired… to Self-Destruct , but they’ll likely take a few more weird excursions (like their puzzling 2011 collaboration with Lou Reed ) in coming years. And yes, they gained a reputation as being stingy with their catalog during that whole Napster dust-up . But as you can hear James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett discuss in a recent Nerdist podcast (stream it at the bottom of this post), their “creative restlessness” has made them very appreciative of what other artists have done with their music, stretching it into alien genres and unexpected instrumentation and arrangements. In his self-deprecating way, Hetfield confesses, “there’s a lot of better versions of ‘ Nothing Else Matters ’ than ours.” Hammett agrees, and here you’ll find most of those they mention—from Scott D.
InfoWars Daily Podcast
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The Corbett Report
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Social Media Examiner
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21stCenturyWire
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InfoWars Daily Podcast
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