Scientific American - Latest
13 hours
Mondoweiss
9 days
As for the arms we put in, Barnard states: But he also said any further American effort to arm rebels or join the fight could backfire. What about the arms already sent? Right now we're putting an extraordinary amount of arms in, Kerry said, unquoted by the Times. Was there something in Kerry's logic that would show our past arms support did no harm, but future support would? Doesn't his argument point to the painful awareness that some of the hundreds of thousands who have died in Syria died because we and our allies kept the war going? CNN had a similar focus to the Times. Kerry also expressed sympathy for the Syrians' demands that the United States intervene more forcefully amid Syrian and Russian airstrikes against civilians, telling the group that he lost the argument for using military force against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad One would be hard pressed to think of an example where activists passionately opposed to US interventions or crimes or the crimes of our allies had a private conversation with an American Secretary of State.
MarketingProfs
9 days
The Huffington Post
9 days
The Huffington Post
14 days
Washingtons Blog
17 days
The Event Chronicle
23 days
They are not exactly Free Masons but they are a secret society or I would say semi-secret society based on masonic model and there are both positive and negative mixed in those groups out there. Some of them are connected to the Dragons, but I would say not the majority of them. And they are not the Dragons. AaronCan you tell us about their ideals and if their ideals are related to Gnosticism? COBRA – I would say a small percentage of those groups have a Gnostic ideal but most likely it’s more about brotherhood and support. Actually Chinese diaspora around the world use this to support them in sometimes unfriendly environment. LynnOK, this one is on World PoliticsPhilippines: Is President Duterte enlightened or over lighted/guided by the Light Forces? COBRANo, he is not enlightened. (OK) LynnIs Former Pres. Ferdinand Marcos still alive? COBRANo.
Informed Comment
a month
By Coral Dando | (The Conversation) | The US president-elect Donald Trump has on several occasions insisted that torture is a good idea and that procedures such as water-boarding are not “tough enough” when dealing with terrorist groups like Islamic State. The view is clearly morally and ethically questionable. But if we put that aside, does he have a point? If we need to get information out of someone who is plotting to kill lots of innocent people, is it a necessary evil? Well, there’s some psychological research on the subject that can help us answer this question. Torture can be defined in many ways but it is always intentional and concerns inflicting psychological and/or physical pain to gain information, a confession or simply to punish. There must exist an asymmetrical relationship of power – a dependence and vulnerability where victims realise that they are at the mercy of their tormentors.
NPR News
a month
BoingBoing
2 months
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
“It'll look like we’re whining about the rules. It’ll look like it’s boring to people. It doesn't work.” I think that they are wrong. Whenever you put redistricting reform on a ballot, it doesnt matter if it’s a blue state, or a purple state, or a red state, it passes with more than 60% of the vote, people want their votes to count. They want their election to matter. They understand that something is wrong with the system. But nobody on either side not the Republicans, not the Democrats, and not the press is conducting a serious conversation about the systemic democratic, small [?] Democratic decay in this country, and what we have to do to make these institutions function properly again. Maybe that will change now that Donald Trump is president-elect. Jeff: What is it in the Republican mindset that really set them on this path and allowed them to feel comfortable doing it, versus the Democratic mindset which as you’ve talked about feels so uncomfortable? David: Yeah, it's a great question.
NPR News
2 months
That was summed up in a back-and-forth over whether Americans in fact chose Trump. "Listen, you guys won," said Clinton pollster Joel Benenson. "That's clear. You won the Electoral College. Let's also be honest. Don't act as if you have some popular mandate for your message. ...the fact of the matter is, is that more Americans voted for Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump." Listen, you guys won... 0:37 Toggle more options Embed Embed "> iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504093288/504104078" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player"> Conway had a simple retort. "Hey guys, we won," Conway said. "I mean seriously, hold on. Why is there no mandate? You've lost 60 congressional seats since President Obama got there." At one point, discussion turned to the hiring in August of Steve Bannon as CEO of Trump's campaign.
21stCenturyWire
2 months
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
US-Cuba relations have often been the captive of American domestic politics — perhaps never as critically as right now. As Raul Castro continues to delicately tinker with internal reforms and a new US President-elect has already blustered threats, things could get ugly. Over fifty years and ten US presidencies, relations with Cuba have always been shadowed by suspicion and distrust. Now, just as the Obama administration has turned that around, according to Cuba expert Peter Kornbluh, a new era of confrontation may be on hand. Kornbluh talks to WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman about what might be next. Note: Peter Kornbluh is director of the National Security Archive's Chile Documentation Project and of the Cuba Documentation Project. Click HERE to Download Mp3 Related front page panorama photo credit: Adapted by WhoWhatWhy from Raul Castro (thierry ehrmann / Flickr CC BY 2.
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
We like to think we are rational beings. That our voting choices are based on a careful analysis of all those policy papers, websites and debates that the candidates participate in. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. Heaps of academic evidence now tell us that we vote, especially for president, based on emotion, on grievances, on tribalism, taste and on a set of biased moral judgments. None of it is based on reason or rationality. In this week’s WhoWhatWhy conversation, Jeff Schechtman talks to Eyal Winter, who is a professor at the University of Leicester and the leader of the Center for the Study of Rationality of the Hebrew University. Winter says that while we crave ideology and we want our politicians to be ideologues, we simply see the ideology as a way for them to convey their personality to us. He also talks about the “voting paradox.
NPR News
2 months
"They didn't ask where it came from. They didn't verify it. They simply accepted the picture as fact." Many high school students couldn't tell a real and fake news source apart on Facebook. One assessment presented two posts announcing Donald Trump's candidacy for president — one from the actual Fox News account, with a blue checkmark indicating it was verified, and one from an account that looked like Fox News. "They didn't ask where it came from. They didn't verify it. They simply accepted the picture as fact." Sam Wineburg, lead author of the study "Only a quarter of the students recognized and explained the significance of the blue checkmark, a Stanford press release noted. "And over 30 percent of students argued that the fake account was more trustworthy." Most college students didn't suspect potential bias in a tweet from an activist group.
NPR News
2 months
"They didn't ask where it came from. They didn't verify it. They simply accepted the picture as fact." Many high school students couldn't tell a real and fake news source apart on Facebook. One assessment presented two posts announcing Donald Trump's candidacy for president — one from the actual Fox News account, with a blue checkmark indicating it was verified, and one from an account that looked like Fox News. "They didn't ask where it came from. They didn't verify it. They simply accepted the picture as fact." Sam Wineburg, lead author of the study "Only a quarter of the students recognized and explained the significance of the blue checkmark, a Stanford press release noted. "And over 30 percent of students argued that the fake account was more trustworthy." Most college students didn't suspect potential bias in a tweet from an activist group.
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
My guest Robert Groden has since the beginning been on the forefront of the effort to try and understand what really happened and why. He's written extensively about conspiracy theories regarding the assassination. His books include The Killing of a President: The Complete Photographic Record of the JFK Assassination ; The Search for Lee Harvey Oswald: The Comprehensive Photographic Record ; and JFK: The Case for Conspiracy . He was a consultant to Oliver Stone on his film JFK and was responsible for bringing the Zapruder film to national attention. It is my pleasure to welcome Robert Groden to Radio WhoWhatWhy . Robert, thanks much for joining us. Robert Groden : Thank you, Jeff. Appreciate being here. Jeff : First of all in an overall sense and certainly this is something you've been with for a very, very, very long time, what is it about this story, this murder, this assassination, that still captivates us to this day? Robert : Well for one thing, it’s an amazing murder mystery.
21stCenturyWire
2 months
21stCenturyWire
2 months
NPR News
2 months
NPR News
2 months
Max Keizer
2 months
WhoWhatWhy
2 months
During the campaign we heard over and over that Donald Trump was the ultimate outsider and a threat to the established order. But is he really going to shake up what Peter Dale Scott calls The Deep State? In his conversation with WhoWhatWhy ’s Jeff Schechtman, Scott identifies some early signs that suggest Trump and his people may already be bending to The Deep State, and explains why he thinks even some good may come from this extreme testing of the democratic process. While in no way accepting any of Trump’s policies, and indeed sharing hopes that he will be a one-term president, Scott calls for maintaining an open mind. Click HERE to Download Mp3 Full Text Transcript: (Beta) Jeff Schechtman: Welcome to Radio WhoWhatWhy. I’m Jeff Schechtman. Over the course of the past campaign, we heard over and over and over again about Trump being the ultimate outsider; that his policies were a threat not only to the established order, but to the people and institutions of both parties that are often referred to as the permanent government.