MarketingProfs
6 days
BoingBoing
2 months
We call this “evolvable hardware.” One of the best examples is Tesla, the car, which is networked and collects data. Tesla, the company, can modify the cars through over-the-air software updates that enhance and update the experience. This kind of thing is not limited to cars. We already see it with our phones. Part of this research is to challenge us with the idea that the capabilities we currently find in our phones are going to find their way into in everyday objects. New toys will continuously capture and sense data and use that data to enhance the experience with the child. It will also access cloud intelligence to be able to have those interactions with your child. It will also evolve and as we create new software or as the manufacturer of that toy creates new software. I want to go back to jobs again, because that’s on everybody’s mind.
Techradar
3 months
£2.99/US$3.99 (around AU$5.10) Many phones have IR blasters built in, allowing you to control your TV with them. This can be useful, but given that most televisions come with a remote it's often unnecessary. Being able to control your computer with your phone though can be far more beneficial, especially if you're using it to watch or listen to something, without being sat right at your desk. That's where Unified Remote Full comes in. Using Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, with no IR blaster required, it can communicate with your PC or Mac, along with other devices such as a Raspberry Pi. There are over 90 built in remotes, giving you full control over various pieces of software, so whether you want a full virtual mouse and keyboard or just want a Netflix remote with buttons for playing and pausing content Unified Remote has you covered. There's a free version of the app, but most of the content is locked behind a one-time payment, which it's well worth making if your PC is your primary device for media consumption.
BoingBoing
3 months
WhoWhatWhy
3 months
Russ : They own media companies and now we see, of course, the electronics industry high-tech software you go to Silicon Valley and a lot of defense–I hate to call it defense, it really isn't defense–as it is overly defensive military contracting. There is a tremendous amount of the business being gotten by the companies from the NSA, CIA, and all these different agencies. This is this tremendous cash center for everybody. Pat : And then the police now are being more militarized as well. Russ : That's right, and of course once we had 9/11, in addition to having all of the previous wars that we had–of course we already had a kind of a war on terrorism with the national security state but then we had the Homeland Security state which was another state. So they were able to take all this vest spending the overseas and then duplicated with a domestic model.
BoingBoing
4 months
I did an interview with the Changelog podcast ( MP3 ) about my upcoming talk at the O'Reilly Open Source conference in London , explaining how it is that the free and open web became so closed and unfree, but free and open software stayed so very free, and came to dominate the software landscape. (more)
BoingBoing
4 months
Gabriella Coleman, the anthropologist whose first book, Coding Freedom , explained hacking culture better than any book before or since; and whose second book, Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy , told the inside story of Anonymous with technical and social brilliance, appeared on the Theory of Everything podcast ( MP3 ) to discuss the ways that free software hackers and the more business-friendly open source world have fought, reconciled and fought again. (more)
NPR News
5 months
NPR News
6 months
Trump,' Alperovitch said." In an interview Monday with NBC , the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, refused to confirm whether the nearly 20,000 private emails his organization published came from a hack conducted by Russian state intelligence, saying it would be "immoral and unethical" to speculate about a source. Assange said "The DNC has been riddled by hackers for years," adding that it was "completely not proven" whether Russia was behind the emails WikiLeaks published. Assange told NBC: "It's fanciful to just try to go, well, some Russian attack software was used among a number of different hacks in the DNC a year ago, and then try to say that is the same process that led to [the WikiLeaks] publication. ... "There have been [past] allegations that... [WikiLeaks] sources are dissidents within intelligence services. That's true. But there have been no credible allegations that our sources have been state intelligence agencies acting with the authority of the government.
SiteProNews
8 months
“The time will come when Magenta has 20 different music generation models available in open source,” Eck said. “How do we decide which ones are good? … In the end, to answer the evaluation question we need to get Magenta tools in the hands of artists and musicians, and Magenta media in front of viewers and listeners. As Magenta evolves, we’ll be working on good ways to achieve this.” Project Magenta is being developed by a small team of researchers from the Google Brain team. It was built using Google's TensorFlow , an open source software library for numerical computation. This AI is used to add speech and object recognition to Google’s products. To stay apprised of Magenta, you can follow the effort on GitHub and join the discussion group . Jennifer Cowan is the Managing Editor for SiteProNews. The post Google's Magenta Project Composes First Song appeared first on SiteProNews .
BoingBoing
8 months
Dan Benjamin is a podcaster, writer, software developer, and ex-corporate stooge. He is the founder of 5by5 , a podcast network where he hosts a handful of shows. He is the author of baconmethod.com and hivelogic.com , and has written for A List Apart and O’Reilly. Dan lives in Austin, Texas with his wife and their children. Subscribe to the Cool Tools Show on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page Show notes: Staedtler Mars Mechanical Pencil ($6) and Sharpener This could be called an architect's pencil or a draftsman's pencil or a lead holder is the name that I've always used for it. ... What's nice about it is it's lightweight ... but it's got that nice metal grippiness to it. ... Instead of being like a regular mechanical pencil where you click the end of it and it advances the lead millimeter by millimeter out, this thing you can control.
BoingBoing
8 months
Over at Cool Tools, Kevin Kelly and I interviewed Joshua Schachter , the creator of the social bookmarking site, Delicious, the creator of GeoURL, and the co-creator of Memepool. He's a fascinating person! Subscribe to the Cool Tools Show on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page Show notes: Othermill ($2,199) "It's basically a 3-D remover. The examples it comes with are mostly targeted around designed PCB, PC boards, so it comes with copper-clad boards, and you etch away and drill through the places where circuits would, chips would go in, parts would go in, and be soldered to ... It's not too expensive, it's easy to machine .. Other Machine has made software that's actually pretty good if you have 2-D shapes you want to cut out of materials, it can go directly from SVG to machine, and when I'm in a hurry I often do that.
BoingBoing
9 months
... There's all these buttons on it that, at first don't make any sense and they sort of just have numbers or whimsical little designs on them and when you press them, all of a sudden there's this advanced functionality." Sketch ($99) "It's kind of now my go-to design tool because it's such a focused piece of software, in terms of, it was focused specifically on what I was trying to do, which was basically prototype how something would look on a iOS device and be able to immediately export things and put them in code and put them in action, as opposed to having to do lots of, jumping through lots of hoops to export stuff. ... It's definitely great as just a basic graphic design tool ... whether it's doing a mock-up for a web page or just making a poster or a flyer or something. It does everything that Illustrator does on the basic level." Making Music: 74 Creative Strategies for Electronic Music Producers ($30) "This is a really great book by Dennis DeSantis .
InfoWars Daily Podcast
10 months
Futurity
10 months
Carrots and cookies not only taste different. They make distinct sounds when you chew them. This may seem trivial, but it is helping create a library that catalogs the unique sounds that foods make as we bite, grind, and swallow them. The library will be part of a software package supporting AutoDietary, a food-tracking necklace similar to Fitbit and other wearable devices. Only instead of tracking burned calories, it will monitor caloric intake—or what we eat. Listen to the sounds apples cookies peanuts There is no shortage of wearable devices that tell us how many calories we burn, but creating a device that reliably measures caloric intake isn't so easy, says Wenyao Xu, assistant professor of computer science at the University at Buffalo's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. [Smart sweatband' can tell if you're dehydrated] The device wraps around the back of the neck like a choker necklace.
The Event Chronicle
a year
) 3) They can commit straight up scientific fraud by diluting samples after extraction, for example, or by entering the wrong sample mass into the software that calculates the quantitative results. This is precisely what the CDC and EPA routinely do when it suits their political interests, and we know the FDA has a long history of engaging in scientific fraud to cover up the deadly side effects of drugs like Vioxx and Rezulin. For all these reasons, you should fully expect to see private labs producing far higher glyphosate numbers than the FDA, even for the same foods tested . Even if the FDA does manage to report some glyphosate findings in foods, it will almost certainly declare any concentration it finds to be safe. If the agency keeps finding higher and higher levels in foods that it tests, it will simply raise the allowable level of exposure to match that concentration, once again proclaiming that glyphosate is safe in essentially unlimited amounts.
MarketingProfs
a year
BoingBoing
a year
Daniel Lange and Felix "tmbinc" Domke bought some of Volkswagen's cheating Engine Control Units on Ebay and extracted and decompiled the software in them to learn exactly how the cheating took place. (more)
Open Culture
a year
European countries, of course, already have all sorts of laws that curb offensive speech and impose harsh penalties, from large fines to jail time. Those laws are extending to the internet as well, a speech domain long censored by Chinese authorities. Whether European measures against racist and xenophobic speech actually lessen racism and xenophobia is an open question, as is the problem of exceptions to the laws that seem to allow certain kinds of prejudices as they strongly censor others. Much more extreme examples of the suppression of free speech have recently come to light under autocratic regimes in the Middle East. In Syria, software developer and free speech advocate Bassel Khartabil has been held in prison since 2012 for his activism. In Saudi Arabia, artist, poet, and Palestinian refugee Ashraf Fayadh has been sentenced to death for “renouncing Islam.
Max Keizer
a year
Automation will not just continue replacing human laborthe pace of this trend is increasing exponentially. 2. The wishful thinking that technology always creates more jobs than it destroys is, well, wishful thinking: just ask the music industry, which grew in the era of digital technology from a $14 billion industry to a $7 billion industry. 3. The wishful thinking that taxing the owners of robots and software will pay for guaranteed income for all: nobody who favors this seems to have done any math. Current corporate profits (which are about to be eviscerated by global recession and the commoditization of goods and services via automation) are around $1.9 trillion annually, while current government (federal, state, local) spending is $6.2 trillion. So if the state took every single dollar of corporate profit (and how realistic is that?), that would fund less than a third of current state spending.
MobileNations
a year
Russell and Jerry are joined by Bla1ze from CrackBerry, Richard from everywhere and the one and only Kevin Michaluk to talk everything BlackBerry Priv. It's new, it's exciting and just may be what BlackBerry needs to turn things around. We talk keyboards, software and hubs — then we tackle your questions from the live QA. Thanks to this week's sponsors! Red Hat: See what managed open-source enterprise software can do for you. Harry's: Save $5 on your first order with coupon code AC. Braintree: The easiest way to add payments to your app Podcast podcast 261: The BlackBerry Privcast!
MobileNations
a year
Whoa, nelly. This week we've got our first look at Samsung's freaking 18-inch family-sized tablet. Plus we've reviewed the LG V10 and HTC One A9 — and we'll tell you what you need to know about this Chrome merging with Android thing. Thanks to this week's sponsors! Red Hat: See what managed open-source enterprise software can do for you. TransferWise: Get your first international money transfer free (up to $500). Podcast podcast 260: Rubberized, for your protection
MobileNations
a year
With some of us at the Big Android BBQ in Texas and others of us knee-deep in devices, we've brought on our pal JR Raphael to help hold down the fort this week. On tap we've got more time with the new Nexus phones, the new HTC One A9, and we hit the QA hard and heavy. (Voicemails will return next week!) Our thanks to this week's sponsors: Braintree: A great mobile payments API. Visit braintreepayments.com/androidcentral Red Hat: See what managed open-source enterprise software can do for you at RedHat.com Podcast podcast 259: Hitting the wall ...
MobileNations
a year
We've finally pushed out a Material Design update to our app, and to celebrate we've brought Google Developer Expert Mike Wolfson on the podcast to talk about what it's like to revamp an app the way we've done here. If you've ever wondered what it's like to be a coder, you'll want to check this out. (And then go download our updated app !) And then we catch up on some stellar voicemails and dive head-first into the QA. Enjoy! Thanks to this week's sponsors! Braintree : A single payments API for your app that makes transaction simple. Red Hat : See what managed open-source enterprise software can do for your business. Casper Matresses : Try an unbelievably comfortable mattress at home free for 100 days. Save $50 with coupon code ac. Podcast podcast 258: Material Finally!