The Event Chronicle
17 hours
At the age of 16, in 1885 Friedrich Trump landed in New York after emigrating from Kallstadt, Germany. He made a fortune in the Pacific Northwest during the gold-rush era, selling restaurant rooms with prostitutes and alcohol to miners trying to find gold. He worked under the direction of John D. Rockefeller’s investment near Seattle in the last decade of the 1800’s. According to an article by researcher Gwenda Blair published in Politico : “Friedrich Trump’s Seattle restaurant flourished, but he kept his ears open—another aspect of the Trump family MO. In 1894, he heard that John D. Rockefeller, the wealthiest man in the world, was bankrolling a mining operation in a small town north of Seattle named Monte Cristo. Without delay, Trump scoped out the best location there, secured it by filing a bogus mineral claim, built a hotel on the parcel even though it didnt actually belong to him, and began giving the customers, once again, exactly what they wanted: plenty to eat, lots to drink and of course women.
Open Culture
5 days
Open Culture
5 days
Western Morning News
8 days
Edward Capern was a humble postman whose poems, written while walking the rural lanes of North Devon on his daily round in the mid-19th century, won plaudits from the Prime Minister and the support of the biggest literary names of the day. The Bideford postal worker was to become known nationally as the Postman Poet and was referred to as the Devonian Burns. Yet today, two years short of the 200th anniversary of Edward Capern's birth (1819-1894), many of his fellow Devonians are...
Hackaday
12 days
A few weeks ago we covered a (probably) bogus post about controlling a TV with the IR from a flame. That got us thinking about what the real origin of the remote control was. We knew a story about the 38 kHz frequency commonly used to modulate the IR. We've heard that it was from sonar crystals used in earlier sonic versions of remotes. Was that true? Or just an urban myth? We set out to find out. Surprise! Remotes are Old! If you are a younger reader, you might assume TVs have always had remotes. But for many of us, remotes seem like a new invention. If you grew up in the middle part of the last century it is a good bet you were your dad's idea of a remote control: Get up and turn the channel! Turns out remotes have been around for a long time, though. They just weren't common for a long time. If you really want to stretch back, [Oliver Lodge] used a radio to move a beam of light in 1894.
Liverpool Echo
19 days
HubSpot Marketing Blog
20 days
It was a precursor to both the record store and the juke box, and could be called a milestone in the evolution of music consumption. The Record Store Source: Spillers Spillers, a record store in Cardiff, U.K., claims to be “ the oldest record shop in the world. ” It was founded in 1894, within the era of phonograph parlors, for the “sale of phonographs, wax phonograph cylinders and shellac phonograph discs.” The store still exists, but has since relocated. The oldest U.S. record store, Pennsylvania-based Bernie George’s Song Shop , was established in 1932, and also continues to thrive -- it even now boasts two locations. Some speculate that musical recordings came second to a song’s sheet music. In Vinylmint’s written history of the industry, it’s said that “the music business was dominated not by major record labels, but by song publishers and big vaudeville and theater concerns.
Daily Express
21 days
TWO "lost" items bought for young twins by the last Empress of Russia when she stayed in a Yorkshire town have been returned to the area over a century later.
BoingBoing
21 days
When detectives arrested H.H. Holmes in 1894, they thought he was a simple con man. But they were shocked to discover that he'd been operating a bizarre Chicago hotel full of blind passageways, trapdoors, hidden chutes, and asphyxiation chambers in which he'd sadistically murdered dozens of victims. In today's show we'll follow the career of America's first documented serial killer, who headlines called "a fiend in human shape." We'll also gape at some fireworks explosions and puzzle over an intransigent insurance company. Show notes Please support us on Patreon!
Daily Mail - Home
21 days
In 2016 the amount of coal used in the UK fell by 52 per cent. And the fossil fuel’s share of the market dropped to 9 per cent last year, from 23 per cent two years ago.
New Scientist - Online news
22 days
Emissions of the major greenhouse gas fell almost 6 per cent year-on-year in 2016 to the lowest levels seen since 1894
HubSpot Marketing Blog
a month
The Event Chronicle
a month
Also in 1915 the Sykes-Picot Agreement was signed, dividing the Muslim Middle East into French and English mandates, financed by the Bank of England, which was owned by the Rothschilds, and forcing the British to double-cross the Hashemites regarding their caliphate and Muslim self-determination on that land. In 1917 the Balfour Declaration was sent to Lord Rothschild in recognition of England’s intent to “support” the establishment of a Jewish homeland. This was shortly after political Zionism began in response to “anti-Semitism,” which itself arrived mysteriously in history without precedent in 1894 in France in what is known as the Dreyfus Affair and unexpectedly in Russia, Poland, and Bulgaria at the end of the nineteenth century as well. Lord Rothschild happened to be president of the British Zionist Federation at the time of the Balfour Declaration.
Open Culture
a month
Few of us today, in search of unconventional artistry, would imagine mid-20th-century CBS game shows as a promising resource. But looking back, it turns out that American television of that era — a time and place when more people were exposed to the very same media than any before or since — managed to bring a surprising number of genuine creators before its mainstream-of-the-mainstream audience. In 1960, for instance, experimental composer John Cage performed Water Walk , his piece for a bathtub, pitcher, and ice cubes, on I’ve Got a Secret . Three years later, Cage’s near-namesake John Cale took the show’s stage to play Erik Satie’s “melancholic yet deadpan, ecclesiastical yet demonicVexations . Though Cage didnt make a reappearance for the occasion, he did have a connection to the music itself. Dating to 1893 or 1894 and unpublished during Satie’s lifetime, Vexation s’ score contains a note from the composer: “Pour se jouer 840 fois de suite ce motif, il sera bon de se préparer au préalable, et dans le plus grand silence, par des immobilités sérieuses,” taken by the piece’s interpreters to mean that they should play it 840 times in a row.
Derby Telegraph
2 months
When Derby County were 3-0 down against Bristol City at Pride Park Stadium on Saturday, Steve McClaren would have perhaps been pleased to have the opportunity to start the match again. However, the Rams actually did that more than 100 years ago - with disastrous consequences - in the Game of Three Halves. In their opening match of the 1894-95 season, Derby arrived at Sunderland for their first match of the season - only to learn that the appointed referee, Mr T. Kirkham, of...
Daily Mail - Home
2 months
Princess Alix of Hesse (pictured) gifted the sets to a local woman in 1894 after visiting the town of Harrogate, North Yorkshire. The last Tsarina thought the woman's twins were a good omen.
Beijing Bulletin
2 months
The Huffington Post
2 months
Washingtons Blog
2 months
TIME - Top Stories
2 months
In 1894, they came to Washington to demand a solution to unemployment. Led by Jacob Coxey , they contributed a not-so-flattering term to the American lexicona Coxey's Army is a ragtag groupand many were arrested. But, though their immediate goals were not achieved, they accomplished something more important: starting an American tradition of bringing protest to Washington, D.C., using the people's presence to send a message to those in power. And, like Coxey's Army, marchers who have been disappointed in the short term have often wielded great influence in the long term. In 1913, they were suffrage supporters, putting together a march that played an important role in getting American women the vote. In 1932, they were the Bonus Expeditionary Force , a group of World War I veterans who, suffering during the Great Depression, sought an early payout on the service bonuses they were due.
Al Jazeera
3 months
Dover Express
3 months
Hackaday
3 months
Initially, the resistance across the electrodes was relatively high thanks to the loosely packed powder and oxide coatings on each grain. A passing radio wave would cause the grains to almost weld together sometimes sparks were reported coming from the coherer tube which lowered the resistance enough to conduct electricity. Lodge had used his coherer to detect Hertzian waves in 1894, shortly after the death of their namesake. The world's first radio receiver. Source: ITU News In his Naval School lab, Popov read of Lodge's discovery and decided to explore it further. Being of a naval bent, he was concerned with the weather and atmospheric phenomena, and wondered whether a coherer could detect the electromagnetic signature of lightning. He set about building his own coherer, improving the design by building in an automatic decoherer.
The Week
3 months