Politico
an hour
The White House is sending mixed signals as to whether or not it will rescind President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban even as officials seek to craft a new order that will be less vulnerable to legal challenge. The Justice Department told the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals last week that Trump will rescind...and replace the original order, which remains largely on hold after an appeals court panel upheld a lower court’s broad injunction. But White House press secretary Sean Spicer said at the conclusion of his daily briefing Tuesday that Trump will not rescind the original order. Instead, the first order is being updated, Spicer insisted. The contradictory statements sowed further confusion about the fate of Trump's original order, which bars immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries and halts the entry of refugees. The new order is going to be very much tailored to what I consider to be a very bad decision, Trump said last week.
WhoWhatWhy
3 hours
Voice Of America
5 hours
S. election aimed at helping Trump win. Flynn had led Pence and other Trump aides to believe there had been been no such talk about the Obama sanctions, with Pence then publicly relating the erroneous information on a news talk show. Trump denied that he had directed Flynn to discuss the sanctions with Kislyak, but added, "I would have." The president said Flynn was doing his job to make contact with foreign officials ahead of the new administration taking power. While several congressional panels, chiefly the intelligence committees in both the Senate and House of Representatives, are looking into those and other alleged contacts between Trump aides and Russia, the chairman of the House's main investigative committee has asked the U.S. Justice Department to launch an investigation into the leaks surrounding the Flynn-Kislyak calls. "We have serious concerns about the potential inadequate protection of classified information here," said Utah congressman Jason Chaffetz.
Sky News
6 hours
At the Department of Justice. But recently we have heard that that may be in office that the president is going to cut, those would all be steps in the wrong direction. If you really want to work on unifying this country, you have to speak to the real needs that so many communities are feeling, the fear that his administration and many of his actions feel, or feel because of those actions.
Washingtons Blog
6 hours
Washingtons Blog
6 hours
Obama and Hillary remain conspicuously sequestered from this maelstrom, but they must be working their phones like nobody’s business. (Is the IC monitoring them, too, one wonders?) Until his Queeg-on-steroids news conference late yesterday, Trump laid pretty low after General Flynn was thrown under the bus, but he must be plotting counter-moves, with Bannon and Steven Miller straining at their leashes, slavering for blood. Will some employees over at the CIA and the — what? — sixteen other IC outposts that stud the government like shipworms in a rotting hulk — be called on the carpet of the oval office, and possibly handed pink slips? How do you drain that swamp in Langley, VA? Perhaps with subpoenas? Surely Jeff Sessions over at the Department of Justice has got to be weighing action against the IC leakers. That shit is against the law. The next disturbing element of the situation is all the war-drum beating by the same cast of characters: the IC, the Democratic Party, and major media.
Mondoweiss
7 hours
After Azaria was found guilty of manslaughter January, Ido Zelkovitz, head of the Middle East studies department at Max Stern Academic College of Emek Yezreel and senior researcher at the University of Haifa told Mondoweiss that both sides of the Israeli political spectrum agreed on one thing Azaria shot a terrorists in their eyes which in the end, he said would indeed lead to a pardon after Azaria serves a small part of his sentence. “Even if he was unarmed and he couldnt put anyone in danger, the common idea among all the Israeli camps is that Azaria shot a terrorist and there is no debate about that question — it is a mutual understanding. That is why in the future the pardon will be accepted,” Zelkovitz said. Abu Shamsiya agreed, telling Mondoweiss that he would be shocked if Azaria was actually made to serve his full sentence.
Voice Of America
7 hours
On Facebook, she shares her story with others who've left or are looking to leave extremism. "We act as a group of people who understand each other," said former skinhead Christian Picciolini, an old friend of Martinez who founded the Chicago-based Life After Hate. "We understand the motivations of where we came from and why we joined. We understand what keeps people in. And we help each other detach and disengage from that ideology and provide a support system for them as they go through that transformation." Founded in 2009, Life After Hate was awarded a $400,000 Justice Department grant in the closing days of the Obama administrationfunding that could be endangered if the Trump administration decides to refocus a federal program combatting violent extremism solely on Islamic radicals, as is being considered. Leaving hate behind While several other grant recipients are dedicated to countering radical Muslim ideology, Life After Hate concentrates specifically on showing white extremists there's another way.
WhoWhatWhy
9 hours
MSNBC
9 hours
Politico
13 hours
In just a month, McGahn has also found himself caught up in the early controversies of Trump’s presidency. As counsel, he is responsible for advising the White House on the drafting of executive orders, like Trump’s immigration and refugee ban, which has been frozen by a flurry of successful lawsuits. And McGahn, a powerful yet typically under-the-radar figure, played a starring role in last week’s biggest White House scandal, when Americans learned that the Justice Department’s acting attorney general at the time had personally warned him in late January that Trump’s national security adviser, Michael Flynn, was susceptible to bribery following private conversations he had had with Russia’s ambassador to the United States before Trump’s inauguration. McGahn concluded “there was not a legal issue,” according to White House press secretary Sean Spicer.
CNN
14 hours
KyivPost
15 hours
The Sun Daily - World News
18 hours
WASHINGTON: Nearly a dozen Jewish community centres across the United States received bomb threats that led to evacuations Monday, in the latest wave of such attacks since Donald Trump became president a month ago. The latest phoned-in threats, at 11 separate sites, bring to 69 the total number of such incidents – at 54 Jewish community centres in 27 US states and one Canadian province – according to the JCC Association of North America. It cautioned, however, that all bomb threats made Monday, as well as on three others datesJanuary 9, 18 and 31 – turned out to be hoaxes, and all targeted community centres have resumed normal operations. The FBI and the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division are said to be investigating the incidents. Meanwhile, local media reported that more than 100 headstones were damaged at a Jewish cemetery in St Louis, Missouri.
Politico
20 hours
Breitbart News
a day
The Event Chronicle
a day
KyivPost
a day
Poroshenko targeted Apart from the plan that plays well with Russia’s interests, Artemenko delivered to the White House compromising materials that allegedly prove corruption of Poroshenko, including evidence of illegal offshore activities. Artemenko claimed that he received the materials from Valentyn Nalyvaichenko, ex-chief of the Security Service in Ukraine, who was fired by Poroshenko in 2015. Nalyvaichenko, however, said that he gave such materials directly to Trump representatives in January, to the U.S. Department of Justice and to Ukraine's prosecutor general. He denied giving the materials to Artemenko and said he hasnt seen Artemenko’s peace plan. Instead, he said that he shared with the Americans his own ideas for ending the conflict. The story got even more intricate when another player surfaced: Fugitive lawmaker Oleksandr Onyshchenko told the Kyiv Post that Artemenko’s evidence of Poroshenko’s alleged corruption was the same or similar to the materials he himself had submitted to the U.
The Event Chronicle
a day
Mondoweiss
a day
The Sun Daily
2 days
An expanded panel rehearing is not uncommon; and occurs some 15 to 25 times a year in the California Appeal Court. Washington's chief lawyer says that in effect the Appellate court treated the hearing as though it was an application for this injunction. He is urging the trial court to proceed to trial and decide on the legality of the ban. Trump's lawyers from the Justice Departmentequivalent to our Attorney General's Chambersmaintain that the president has absolute power to impose travel bans. They argued that the ban needed to be reinstated as a matter of national security. In rejecting this argument, the Appeal Court said there was "no evidence that any alien from any of the countries named in the order has perpetrated a terrorist attack in the United States". On Trump's claim that courts cannot review the president's decisions about immigration policy, particularly when motivated by national security concerns, even if those actions potentially contravene constitutional rights and protections, the Appeal Court ruled: "There is no precedent to support this claimed unreviewability, which runs contrary to the fundamental structure of our constitutional democracy.
Politico
2 days
A handful of Democratic House progressives — among them California Rep. Maxine Waters, Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin, and Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro — have already publicly raised the specter of impeachment. Waters has said she thinks Trump is marching himself down the path to impeachment, while Raskin — whose office was presented this week with a petition carrying more than 850,000 signatures calling for impeachment — has repeatedly brought up the prospect of voting for impeachment at some point in rallies and interviews. Castro has said Trump should be impeached if the president repeatedly instructed Customs and Border Protection officials to ignore federal judges' orders. Some have read New York Rep. Jerrold Nadler’s “resolution of inquiry” that could force the Department of Justice to share information about Trump’s Russian ties and conflicts of interest as a way to further lay the groundwork for impeachment.
Informed Comment
3 days
S. Department of Justice is charged with investigating members of the administration—to moves by the FBI that seem calculated to be helpful to the Trump campaign and transition. In sum, it is hard to imagine a case for concluding that these circumstances do not present both a conflict of interest and extraordinary circumstances, Gude and Martin write. These questions about the Trump administration also undermine public trust in the legitimacy of the government and democratic institutions and thus the public interest would be served by an outside independent and impartial Special Counsel conducting the investigation. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License Commondreams.org Related video added by Juan Cole: WISN 12 News: Baldwin calls for Trump, Russia investigation
Voice Of America
3 days
A draft of the replacement executive order shows the administration aims to put restrictions on citizens of the same seven Muslim-majority countries covered by the initial order, according to The Wall Street Journal, which cited an internal State Department memo. Kelly also mentioned "seven nations" during his discussions in Europe. The replacement order could be issued as early as Tuesday, the Journal reported, citing a U.S. government official. Separately, the Trump administration also has asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco to withdraw its earlier ruling that temporarily suspended the travel ban, because a new, superseding order is about to be issued. Protecting the US In so doing, the president will clear the way for immediately protecting the country rather than pursuing further potentially time-consuming litigation," the Justice Department said in its filing.