The Huffington Post
3 hours
Politico
5 hours
Attorney General Jeff Sessions is promising to keep up the legal battle to carry out President Donald Trump's executive order targeting so-called sanctuary cities, but the top lawman is stopping short of echoing Trump's pledge to take the issue to the Supreme Court. In a statement Wednesday night, Sessions did not indicate whether the administration plans to appeal a district court judge's order Tuesday barring federal officials from using Trump's order to withdraw a broad array of federal funding from localities that decline to cooperate with enforcement of immigration laws. Actions that have always been understood to be squarely within the powers of the President, regardless of the Administration, have now been enjoined, Sessions said. The Department of Justice cannot accept such a result, and as the President has made clear, we will continue to litigate this case to vindicate the rule of law.
Washington Free Beacon
13 hours
Washington Free Beacon
14 hours
Fast Company
18 hours
If I were to undertake an effort like this, I would not obtain the voter rolls of every state and then compare them to these lists of noncitizens and felons and others, cautions David Becker, a former Justice Department attorney who is now executive director of the Center for Election Innovation and Research. You will get an enormous number of false positives. You need much more data, not to mention that voter rolls are riddled with errors in the first place. He points out that such rolls dont have Social Security numbers or drivers license info, and might not evenhave birth dates in some cases. Comparing first name and last name and maybe date of birthany statistician will tell you thats an awful way to match and it will not deliver credible results, he continues.
The Economic Times
19 hours
Informed Comment
a day
The Week
a day
Fresh delays for RBS's toxic debt settlement The settlement of Royal Bank of Scotland’s multi-billion pound toxic debt issue has been delayed because of changes at the Department of Justice since the election of Donald Trump. The Times says that although the lender set aside £3.1bn in January to cover a likely fine, it has "hit a brick wall" because of the widespread clearout of key staff at the DoJ and among the state attorneys. Whitbread shares fall as Costa loses its froth Whitbread shares fell by more than 7% after warnings about the threat to Costa and Premier Inn from artisan cafes and Airbnb. The parent company posted a 6.2% rise in profits to £565.2m in the year to March 2, while revenue reached £3.1bn. Growth for the full year at Costa was up 2%, but it slowed in the final 13 weeks, declining 0.8%. Uber previews a flying taxi service Uber is planning to offer flying taxis and says they will one day be cheaper and more environmentally friendly than taking a journey in a car.
euronews
a day
The Sun Daily
a day
Voice Of America
a day
Politico
a day
Rod Rosenstein was confirmed as the second-ranking official at the Justice Department on Tuesday, giving him the reins of the federal investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election after Attorney General Jeff Sessionsrecusal last month. The Senate backed the veteran federal prosecutor as the nation’s deputy attorney general with a 94-6 vote. The chief complaint among the small group of Democrats who opposed Rosenstein was his reluctance to promise to appoint an independent prosecutor to lead the Russia probe. “He is, in some senses, what we value in the Department of Justice: someone committed to the rule of law,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), the most vocal critic of Rosenstein’s nomination. “That’s why I have been surprised and disappointed that he has failed to heed my request.” Though the duties of the deputy attorney general are broad, Rosenstein was catapulted into the spotlight after Sessions — a top ally of President Donald Trumpstepped aside from any federal probe of Trump’s campaign.
Politico
a day
Politico
a day
with a scalpel instead of a meat axe, especially because they didnt have nominees in the pipeline,” said Ronald Weich, the Justice Department’s top legislative liaison under President Barack Obama and now dean of the University of Baltimore School of Law. The acting US attorneys will follow direction, but will not be as committed to the president’s agenda as Senate-confirmed appointees,” he added. Yet it’s still likely to be months before appointees can be confirmed, according to longtime observers and former U.S. attorneys. Appointees have to be screened and vetted by the FBI, and the Senate has to schedule hearings. “The problem is the convergence of judicial vacancies and all executive branch vacancies, so there’s only so much the FBI can do every week,” said one lawyer involved in the process. “On top of that, there have been some rumors that the Judiciary Committee doesnt have capacity to move quicker than it historically has, which historically has only been a few nominations per week.
Voice Of America
a day
Politico
a day
TIME - Top Stories
a day
Variety
2 days
Politico
2 days
Voice Of America
2 days
It's unclear if Congress will give him the money. Civil libertarians object to the prosecutions, saying those arrested are rushed through the legal system without having a chance to exercise their rights. And a previous attempt to expand the Del Rio approach had mixed results. Prosecutions spiked at the end of the Bush administration and during the first years of the Obama administration, but later declined. Limited resources, including jail space and not enough prosecutors, contributed to that drop. Still, Trump administration officials plan to press ahead. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly made the point as they've toured the border in recent weeks, saying that those who enter the U.S. illegally will be prosecuted and deported. The Justice Department this month called on prosecutors to appoint border security coordinators in every judicial district.
Voice Of America
2 days
BBC Parliament
2 days
this. The relevant documents have been published on the Department of Health and National Archives website. It is likely that a public enquiry would provide further information. In my view, that is highly debatable statement, Madam Deputy Speaker. And they do not think a Prime Minister who has a good track record in helping secure justice for those to whom.
MintPress News
2 days
MintPress News
2 days