BBC News 24
3 minutes
are no longer trained in humanities. One of the most critical component of humanities is the notion of ethics. So what we've called for is that every data scientist, every economist, anybody who works with data, must have ethics integrated throughout their entire curriculum, so you construct and have the conversation and dialogue about what are the ethical implications of the choices you make
Sputnik International
an hour
BBC News 24
11 hours
In our training these days, we often have found that technologists are no longer trained in humanities. One of the most critical components of humanities is the notion of ethics, so what we have called for is that every data scientist, every economist, anybody who works with data, must have ethics integrated throughout their entire curriculum. So you can start to have the conversation and dialogue about.
Voice Of America
18 hours
"You can develop that attitude of responding to epidemics when you do simulations," Tedros said during a press conference after his win. "By [conducting] simulations, you can prepare the mind. You can prepare the logistics. You can refine your processes." Tedros pointed to quick responses to an ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo and an outbreak of an unknown illness in Liberia this year as evidence that the continent has learned lessons from the 2014-15 Ebola outbreak. Bureaucracy struggles at agency Tedros' largest challenge may be managing the unique bureaucracy of the WHO. Under its constitution, the organization is divided into six regional offices that operate mostly on their own. A report by The Economist said the directors of these offices are selected by local ministers of health who continue to influence them after they take office.
Voice Of America
20 hours
The U.S. economy expanded at a slightly faster pace than first estimated during the first quarter of this year. The Commerce Department's Friday report shows expansion at a 1.2 percent annual rate in January, February and March. That is nearly twice as fast as the preliminary estimate, but slower than the end of last year, and much more slowly than the 3 percent rate of expansion that the Trump administration says it will achieve. Officials routinely revise growth estimates as more complete data becomes available. Many experts say the economy is growing slowly because aging baby boomers are leaving the work force to retire, and productivity growth has been disappointingly slow. The chief economist of PNC Bank, Gus Faucher, says growth is "bouncing back" in the second quarter. Faucher says he expects the U.S. economic growth will bounce around somewhat and expand at a 2.
TIME - Top Stories
20 hours
Agencies must have a strict criteria as to which networks and individuals and choose to focus their resources on. These are not trivial considerations, he says. Once you put surveillance on somebody, you can't keep on going if you don't get results, he says. According to the Economist, the security services received funding to boost staff numbers by 15% (or by 1,900 people) 18 months ago. But to bulk numbers up to a point where they can feasibly cover every single potential extremist is impractical, says Inkster. I think some organizations do have an organic size and if you do take it much beyond that there is a serious risk you will encounter diminishing returns, he says, more bodies does not necessarily translate into a commensurate increase in output and efficiency. Nor is it practical to perform electronic surveillance be it monitoring e-mails, CCTV footage, wiretapping, and even their dataon every single suspect.
Financial Times - United States
a day
The Economist - Business
a day
WHAT is the point of buying shares? Ultimately investors must hope that the cash they receive from the company will offer an attractive long-term return. Over the long run, reinvested dividends rather than capital gains have comprised the vast bulk of returns. But since the 1980s American firms have increasingly used share buy-backs, which have tax advantages for some investors. Buy-backs have been higher than dividend payments in eight of the past ten years. In a buy-back, investors receive cash for a proportion of their holdings. A new paper* in the Financial Analysts Journal argues that adding this to dividend receipts to calculate a total payout yield gives a better estimate of future returns than the dividend yield alone. It also reveals a much better match between stockmarket performance and overall economic growth. Using data going back to 1871, the authors find that the average dividend yield has been 4.
The Economist - Business
a day
THERESA MAT, Britain’s prime minister, called a surprise election for June 8th arguing that she needed a strong mandate for negotiating Brexit. The pound rallied on the news, in the belief that a large Conservative majority would allow Mrs May the flexibility to do a deal with the EU, and see off the hard-liners among her party. For a while, it looked as if the plan was going well. The Conservatives had a 20-point lead in some polls. But the party’s campaign, heavily reliant on the appeal of its leader and the repeated use of soundbites like “strong and stable”, has been misjudged. The manifesto launch was disastrous and included a pledge to charge the elderly (a key Tory demographic) for social care. That pledge was quickly reversed , but Mrs May’s refusal to admit to an obvious U-turn undermined her strong leadership... Continue reading
Voice Of America
a day
The Unirule Institute of Economics, a liberal think tank headed by the well-known, free-market economist Mao Yushi, was shuttered in January. And elderly editors at a liberal historical journal that examined Chinese history were pushed out last year. “He is one of the most influential public intellectuals — a spokesman for liberalism,” said Teng Biao, a visiting scholar at New York University who practiced and taught law in Beijing before leaving for the U.S. in 2014. “Scholars with an independent spirit or the courage to criticize will never have a good end.” Thorn in party’s side He has long been a thorn in the Communist Party’s side and participated in sensitive campaigns, such as the pro-democracy manifesto movement in 2008 that resulted in a brief quasi-exile from his prestigious Beijing university. But until recently, the government has allowed him a degree of freedom to write.
The Week
a day
BBC News 24
a day
just finished with this, a very interesting piece. The World Bank chief economist said we need to sort out the way we write reports, they are too wordy and also the use of the word "and". He is probably not wrong.
BBC News 24
a day
Apparent turmoil in the World Bank, over the word "and". The organisation's chief economist got on the wrong side of staff there, after he said he wouldn't sign off a World Development Report.
Financial Times - Markets
a day
Daily Express
a day
TRNN
a day
Economist Michael Hudson explains that even though housing prices are back up at 2008 levels homeownership is at a much lower level and banks have their loans guaranteed by the US government
The Economist - Science
2 days
CARMAKERS like to talk about autonomous vehicles (AVs) as if they will be in showrooms in three or four years' time. The rosy scenarios suggest people will soon be whisked from place to place by road-going robots, with little input from those on board. AVs will end the drudgery of driving, we are told. With their lightning reactions, tireless attention to traffic, better all-round vision and respect for the law, AVs will be safer drivers than most motorists. They wont get tired, drunk, have fits of road rage, or become distracted by texting, chatting, eating or fiddling with the entertainment system. The family AV will ferry children to school; adults to work, malls, movies, bars and restaurants; the elderly to the doctor’s office and back. For some, car ownership will be a thing of the past, as the cost of ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft tumbles once human drivers are no longer needed. Going driverless could cut hailing costs by as much as 80%, say optimists.... Continue reading
The Economist - Science
2 days
M.C. Escherichia THE central idea of synthetic biology is that living cells can be programmed in the same way that computers can, in order to make them do things and produce compounds that their natural counterparts do not. As with computers, though, scientists need a way to control their creations. To date, that has been done with chemical signals. In a paper published in Nature Chemical Biology , Christopher Voigt, a biologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, describes an alternative. Instead of chemicals, he and his colleagues demonstrate how to control customised cells with coloured light. Engineering cells to respond to light is not a new idea. The general approach is called optogenetics, and it has become a popular technique for controlling nerve cells in neuroscience. But Dr Voigt is not interested in nerve cells. In 2005 he altered four genes in a strain of Escherichia coli bacteria, which gave... Continue reading
The Economist - Science
2 days
A million dollars up in smoke ON APRIL 7th a salvo of missiles fired by American warships in the Mediterranean scored direct hits on several Syrian aircraft shelters from hundreds of miles away, demonstrating once more the effectiveness of precision, or “smart”, weapons. At $1.3m apiece such missiles are usually reserved for important targets like parked aircraft. They are too pricey to be expended on lightly armed insurgents. (As George Bush junior once memorably put it, he was not prepared to “fire a $2m missile at a $10 empty tent and hit a camel in the butt”.) Frank Fresconi, who works at the Army Research Laboratory’s Aeromechanics and Flight Control Group, in Maryland, hopes to change that. He is working on something called the Collaborative Cooperative Engagement (CCOE) programme, which hopes to provide the advantages of smart weapons at a fraction of the cost. A new generation of cut-price precision munitions could change the way America’s... Continue reading
The Economist - Business
2 days
Financial Times
2 days
Voice Of America
2 days
TIME - Global Spin
2 days
At some point we realize in this country that dealing with terrorism must take the highest priority. Terrorists are enemies of democracy, he said. A respected economist, Papademos headed a provisional coalition government credited with preventing the collapse of the country's international bailout at the time. He also served as governor of the Bank of Greece between 1994 and 2002, when the country adopted the euro currency.
Financial Times
2 days