Mondoweiss
an hour
BBC Parliament
2 hours
a liberal on him. He's been EMP he's been the MP for Chichester since 1987. Members may be her where he was a senior economist before entering Parliament. He is, of course, a very senior parliamentarian, it is no surprise that when we moved to electing our select committee chairs that he was elected overwhelmingly with a.
The Week
4 hours
Significantly, Google, which came ninth in 2015, did not feature in the top ten this year, says The Independent . Also notable was the lack of UK-based companies: only Nomura International is headquartered here and even that is the UK arm of a Japanese banking group. Overall, the ten companies pay an average of £80,000110,000, with a median base salary of £70,00083,400. Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at Glassdoor, said: "This report shows that the big guns in tech and finance still dominate when it comes to large salaries in the UK." Companies
The Economist - Business
4 hours
MONDAY was a day when, in the latest jargon, the markets went "risk on". Equities rose, the spread between the yields of French and German bonds narrowed and the euro rebounded. The reason was the first round of the French presidential election. As the results emerged on Sunday night, it was clear that a) the nightmare of a second round between Marine Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon had been avoided and b) Ms Le Pen's vote was no better than her poll rating, indicating there was no reservoir of shy, far-right voters. The centrist Emmanuel Marcon (pictured) topped the poll and is predicted to get more than 60% of the vote in the second round, far outside the pollsters' margin of error . So France will not follow the US and Britain down the path that led to the election of Donald Trump and the Brexit referendum. But it is way too early to say, as some do , that populism is in retreat. First, France has a much greater tradition of support for the far left... Continue reading
The Economist - Business
5 hours
MONDAY was a day when, in the latest jargon, the markets went "risk on". Equities rose, the spread between the yields of French and German bonds narrowed and the euro rebounded. The reason was the first round of the French presidential election. As the results emerged on Sunday night, it was clear that a)the nightmare of a second round between Marine Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon had been avoided and b)Ms Le Pen's vote was no better than her poll rating, indicating there was no reservoir of shy, far-right voters. The centrist Emmanuel Marcon (pictured) topped the poll and is predicted to get more than 60% of the vote in the second round, far outside the pollsters' margin of error . So France will not follow the US and Britain down the path that led to the election of Donald Trump and the Brexit referendum. But it is way too early to say, as some do , that populism is in retreat. First, France has a much greater tradition of support for the far left... Continue reading
Sky News
6 hours
by the former editor in chief of the Economist magazine. Bill Emmott is now a writer and consultant on international affairs - he joins us now. new book is called the fate of the.
Politico
7 hours
Seattle’s rise as a tech powerhouse was seeded by Microsoft, which moved to the area in 1979 and helped create the ecosystem that gave rise to companies like Amazon. As Enrico Moretti, a University of California, Berkeley, economist who has studied the geography of job creation, points out, the tech entrepreneurs who drive internet publishing could locate their companies in low-rent, low-cost-of-living places like Cleveland, but they dont. They need the most talented workers, who tend to move to the clusters, where demand drives wages higher. And it’s the clusters that host all the subsidiary industries a tech start-up craveslawyers specializing in intellectual property and incorporation; hardware and software vendors; angel investors; and so on. The old newspaper business model almost prevented this kind of clustering. Except for the national broadsheets—the New York Times , the Wall Street Journal , USA Today and increasingly the Washington Postnewspapers must locate, cheek by jowl, next to their customers, the people who consume local news, and whom local advertisers need to reach.
The Sun Daily
9 hours
KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia needs to prepare now to address the ageing society problem which is expected to account for 15% of the population by 2035, failing which, it could bring about massive impact to the country's economic health. DM Analytics Managing Director and Chief Economist Dr Muhammed Abdul Khalid said Malaysians aged above 60 years and above now accounted for eight percent of the population, He explained that the speed at which the population was ageing was the fastest in the world. "This (Malaysia's population problem) is a serious issue that is not being given enough attention. In 2050, we will be in serious trouble. "The entire structure of the economy and ideology needs to be changed, because in future, when we have less workers, it means we are going to collect less tax which will translate to lower capability for expenditure. Who is going to finance this?" he said.
The Economist - United States
19 hours
HE WAS humble, articulate and conciliatory. On April 24th, in his first public appearance since January, Barack Obama charmed his audience with his ability to listen and his unwillingness to boast. As a community organiser on the South Side, "I am the first to acknowledge that I did not set the world on fire," Mr Obama said. “This community gave me a lot more than I was able to give in return.” Mr Obama held his presidential farewell speech on January 11th in Chicago, his adopted hometown, and returned to the Windy City for his re-emergence in public life after an extended holiday. In his farewell speech the former president had reflected on the fragility of democracy. This time he focused on civic engagement and community organising in a 90-minute discussion with a panel of half a dozen youthful activists at the University of Chicago’s Logan Center for the Arts in front of an audience of mainly college students.
The Economist - United States
19 hours
HE WAS humble, articulate and conciliatory. On April 24th, in his first public appearance since January, Barack Obama charmed his audience with his ability to listen and his unwillingness to boast. As a community organiser on the South Side, "I am the first to acknowledge that I did not set the world on fire," Mr Obama said. “This community gave me a lot more than I was able to give in return.” Mr Obama held his presidential farewell speech on January 11th in Chicago, his adopted hometown, and returned to the Windy City for his re-emergence in public life after an extended holiday. In his farewell speech the former president had reflected on the fragility of democracy. This time he focused on civic engagement and community organising in a 90-minute discussion with a panel of half a dozen youthful activists at the University of Chicago’s Logan Center for the Arts in front of an audience of mainly college students.
BBC One East
20 hours
during the Trump years, is taking the route of going around the legislative action and doing more and more by executive order. Theodore Roosevelt Malloch is an economist who's served under presidents
BBC News 24
a day
position on the key issue of immigration? I think he has to take a tougher position on a lot of issues. I spoke to somebody from the Economist last night who said when he was in power he had policies but now he has kept it pretty vague. In the next three.
The Economist - Business
a day
PEOPLE often enter a public toilet with a sense of trepidation; after all, who knows what horror might await behind the cubicle door. Even so, a passenger on a service between Manchester, Britain, and New York got a nasty surprise. Earlier this month an American air marshal accidentally left her loaded gun in the loo of a Delta Air Lines plane bound for JFK. According to the New York Times , the weapon was found by a passenger, who handed it over the to the flight’s crew. The crew then returned it to the officer. The Times says that the air marshal did not report her oversight to authorities for several days, as is required, and had been assigned to other planes in the meantime. Using unimpeachable logic, one former air marshal explained to the paper: “You can’t have inept people leaving weapons in a lavatory. If someone with ill intent gets hold of that weapon on an aircraft, they are now armed.
Sky News
a day
reaction to that from the global economist at Fidelity international. What it means for the French economy, pacing what the challenges. Unemployment at 10%. Ten Macron turn that around it it is expected he beat Marine Le Pen in the second round runoff? Also looking at the.
MintPress News
a day
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Voice Of America
a day
The southern African country - the continent's number 2 copper producer - has traditionally been stable but relations between government and opposition have been fraught since August when Lungu's Patriotic Front (PF) beat the UPND in a presidential election marred by violence and which the opposition says was rigged. It was the second time that Lungu beat Hichilema, an economist and businessman, in a presidential election by a razor-thin margin.
Daily Mail - Money
a day
GDP's not the innocuous little number to measure the economy you might think it is. It's boosted by war, car accidents, poor health - and ignores things like parents looking after children.
The Economist - Middle East and Africa
a day
THE three-hour bus-ride to Ambo from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital, offers a glimpse into the country’s future. The road is well paved; irrigation ditches and polytunnels criss-cross commercial farmland; electricity lines leap over forested hills. The signal granting access to mobile internet is clear and constant. As the bus pulls into Ambo, a trading centre in Oromia, the largest and most populous of Ethiopia’s nine ethnically based regions, the street is bustling. But there are signs, too, that not all is well. An army truck rolls down the main road. Federal police surround the entrance to the local university. Unemployed young men playing snooker in bar point at a building across the road: it used to be a bank, but it was burnt down. Three years ago 17 local boys were shot dead by security guards as they protested on the doorstep, the young men say.
The Week
a day
Voice Of America
a day
The Iran Project
a day
BBC News 24
2 days
into the unknown. Quite extraordinary. The two parties who have ruled the fifth republic since 1958 nowhere to be seen in the second round. I am joined by the Paras editor fought the Economist. And also an editor of a news.
Al Jazeera
2 days
The Sun Daily
3 days
But even Gauland, who was widely mentioned as a candidate to join the AfD campaign team, expressed regret that Petry, who is very popular with the party's base, will not be front-and-centre on the campaign trail. Another likely member of the election team is 38-year-old economist and former investment banker Alice Weidel who has railed against "an army of millions of uneducated migrants from the Middle East and Africa who expect a free ride" in Germany. The daily Sueddeutsche Zeitung said that the dispute was less about the political goals of the party, the most successful right-wing populist outfit in Germany's post-war history, than personal ambition. "The AfD is heading for a showdown that could end up breaking it apart," it said. — AFP