Times of Israel
3 hours
Voice Of America
3 hours
Before Donald Trump won the election, many analysts were sharply critical of his economic proposals. However, in Trump's first month in office, U.S. stocks have hit a series of record highs and consumer confidence improved. Did analysts get it wrong? Economist Mark Zandi, an early critic of Trump's economic plans, said it's still too soon to tell. Mil Arcega reports.
ABC News - Technology
3 hours
Kenneth J. Arrow, the youngest -ever winner of a Nobel prize for economics, has died in California
Voice Of America
3 hours
Before Donald Trump won the November election, many analysts were sharply critical of his economic proposals. Some predicted big declines in financial markets, hiring slowdowns and a heightened risk of recession. But just a little more than a month since Trump became the 45th U.S. president, U.S. stocks have enjoyed the longest winning streak in decades, hiring continues to beat expectations and consumer confidence is soaring. Were naysayers wrong? VOA spoke with an early critic of Trump’s economic plans, Moody’s Analytics chief economist Mark Zandi, to ask him if the experts got it wrong. Zandi’s answer was a crisp “No.” “If Mr. Trump got precisely what he wanted, the policy proposals that he had put forward, what would happen to economy? And the answer is, the economy would go into a deep recession.” Zandi told VOA he stands by his initial assessment before Trump became president, saying that from a policy perspective, he has yet to deliver on his campaign promises.
Sky News
4 hours
Chris Costello joins us. Explain what you're trying to achieve. Here in Bali, it is the World Ocean Summit, put on by the Economist magazine. The big issue being discussed here is obstacle finance and it will be ocean - sustainable ocean economy. What impact is this having on the fishing? Climate change is really a central issue here, especially here in Bali.
NewsMax
12 hours
President Donald Trump isn't getting as much flattering attention as he used to on Russian state media as the Kremlin last week told outlets to cut down on coverage of the U.S. leader, the Economist reports.
BBC One Wales
13 hours
Tributes have been paid to the leading automotive economist Professor Garel Rhys, who's died. He was chairman of the Welsh Automotive Forum, which he established in the late '90s. He died after a short illness a week before his 77th birthday. Rugby.
SABC Digital News
16 hours
The Economist - Business
18 hours
InfoWars
19 hours
The Economist - Science
21 hours
All sorts of chemicals necessary to life flow over time from the land to the sea. For life to go on, they have to find a way back. For many of these chemicals, the route back is through the air; dissolved compounds containing nitrogen, sulphur or iodine are turned into gases that escape into the atmosphere and blow back onto the land. The chemistry involved is mostly that of plankton and seaweed, and it is through their agency that life endlessly renews Earth’s habitability.
Daily Express
21 hours
A LEADING Spanish economist has hit out at the European Central Bank saying "crazy" loans will ruin the lives of the population for the next 50 years.
The Sun Daily
a day
2% of this country's exports last year, this figure could be understated. A significant proportion of Malaysian E&E exports to countries like Singapore, China and Japan could be intermediate goods destined for the US market. Last year, Malaysia's gross exports edged upwards from the previous year by a miserly 1.1% to RM785.9 billion – a deceleration from the lacklustre 1.6% export growth in 2015. Although exports are expected to enjoy faster growth this year, the momentum could remain unexciting. Minister of International Trade and Industry Datuk Seri Mustapa Mohamad predicts exports could inch up by between 2% and 3% this year. UOB Bank economist Julia Goh is more bullish. She foresees a 3.5% uptick in exports this year, an optimism based on the positive impact of a weaker ringgit and the recovery evident in recent data. That both Mustapa and Goh's predictions for export growth are lower than the World Bank's forecasts that this country's economy could expand by 4.
The Iran Project
a day
Alwaght Alwaght has arranged an interview with the economist and advisor of Yemen’s Supreme Political Council Professor Abdulaziz al-Tarb, covering a set of cases including the impacts of the economic blockade on Yemen, the potential role of the international and regional organizations in breaking the blockade to help the Yemeni people, and also discussing the countries taking part in the aggression against Yemen. Alwaght : How does the economic blockade affect the Yemen people and particularly necessary imports like wheat and medicine and how have you dealt with the issue? Al-Tarb : In fact, we have wheat reserves enough for some time, but we demanded from the international and regional organizations to pass our voice to the international community to help lift the siege and open the Yemen’s airports. On the strength of the resistance of the Yemeni people we can weather the crisis until the upcoming Ramadan and we can be determined to reduce our consumption and eat only one meal every day but we will never bow to the aggression, and with God’s help we will beat it.
Washingtons Blog
a day
Forbes
2 days
Put "demographics" in your list of things to worry about regarding China, says Standard Life Investments economist.
The Economist - Middle East and Africa
2 days
IT HAS been a disaster in agonising slow motion. To cut costs, health officials in Gauteng province (South Africa’s economic hub, which includes Johannesburg and Pretoria) decided to transfer psychiatric patients from specialised private hospitals to care homes run by charities. Family members, psychologists and advocacy groups all warned that this could be dangerous for the patients. They pleaded with Qedani Mahlangu, the provincial health minister, and even went to court to try to stop the move, arguing that vulnerable people were being rushed into dodgy homes that would not provide proper care. Ignoring their concerns, Ms Mahlangu went ahead. Some 1,300 patients were moved over several months last year. An ombudsman’s report described this process as a “cattle auction market”, with care homes jostling over which patients they wanted. Some sent pickup trucks to fetch them.
The Economist - Middle East and Africa
2 days
IT HAS been a disaster in agonising slow motion. To cut costs, health officials in Gauteng province (South Africa’s economic hub, which includes Johannesburg and Pretoria) decided to transfer psychiatric patients from specialised private hospitals to care homes run by charities. Family members, psychologists and advocacy groups all warned that this could be dangerous for the patients. They pleaded with Qedani Mahlangu, the provincial health minister, and even went to court to try to stop the move, arguing that vulnerable people were being rushed into dodgy homes that would not provide proper care. Ignoring their concerns, Ms Mahlangu went ahead. Some 1,300 patients were moved over several months last year. An ombudsman’s report described this process as a “cattle auction market”, with care homes jostling over which patients they wanted. Some sent pickup trucks to fetch them.
The Economist - United States
2 days
A RECENT ruling by the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in Ohio could set up the first major religious-liberty case Neil Gorsuch may help resolve if the Senate confirms his nomination to the Supreme Court this spring. The Sixth Circuit case concerns a dispute over legislative prayer, a topic Mr Gorsuch has never weighed in on. But in other cases touching on the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee has shown little inclination to buttress America’s wall of separation between church and state. A few years into his stint as a judge on the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, Mr Gorsuch gave his view on a challenge to a ten commandments display on a courthouse lawn in Oklahoma. The plaintiff in Green v Haskell County said he feared that the county board of commissioners—the body that gave the go-ahead to erecting the monument at the site—would treat him “differently and more harshly” because he did not “subscribe to a particular faith that is represented by [the] monument”.
TRNN
2 days
Economist James Henry explains why we should take Deutschebank's findings about Trump's assets with a grain of salt
Bloomberg
2 days
Bloomberg
2 days
Daily Express
2 days
A TOP German economist and advisor to Angela Merkel’s government has given his backing to Brexit, saying the British have “shown what is wrong in Europe”.
BBC News - Business
2 days
The Bank of England's chief economist admits "sizeable" forecasting errors have been made in the past.