Voice Of America
a minute
On a scaffold several stories high beneath the dome of a Cairo church, Ayman William paints for the glory of God, unfazed by recent attacks against his fellow Coptic Christians in Egypt. The church, deep within the dusty alleyways of one of the many informal neighborhoods that have sprung up to accommodate the capital’s surging population, is building a new extension. And William, 41, who has painted murals in churches as far away as Kuwait and California, is happy to help. Service to the churchGod gave me talent and I must make use of it to serve him,” said William, who was mostly self-taught and says he has drawn inspiration from the Bible during his 15 years in the profession, which he began learning after discovering an affinity for painting icons and murals with childhood friends. Dozens of characters leap out from the dome around him, Adam, Eve, Moses and Samson, as well as New Testament figures such as St.
ABC News - International
39 minutes
Sputnik International
4 hours
CNN
5 hours
BBC News - Business
8 hours
Uber launched in Egypt two years ago, and is now one of the company's fastest growing markets.
BBC News 24
10 hours
More than 10,000 human organs are sold illegally every year, according to the World Health Organisation. Billions of pounds are tied up in the trade, with the Middle East now considered the global hub, driven partly by desperate refugees eager to make money by selling their organs. The largest number of illegal operations happens in Egypt
BBC News 24
10 hours
a darker trade is thriving. The network is wide, from migrant smugglers to some of Egypt's leading doctors. A crumbling health system and shortage of organs has meant that people wait for years, so turn to the black market.
Washington Free Beacon
10 hours
" The letter demands the U.S. government explain how the planned legislation will safeguard health care and provide equal or greater levels of care. "Your government's response will be made available in a report to be presented to the Human Rights Council for its consideration," Puras wrote. The U.N. Human Rights Council is infamous for failing to live up to its name, granting seats to some of the worst human rights violators in the world. Among the current members are China, Cuba, Egypt, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela. The Trump administration is even reportedly considering pulling out of the council entirely. Before Trump, George W. Bush refused to join the council over its questionable membership, while Barack Obama pursued a policy of trying to moderate the body as a member. Milbank, a liberal columnist, notes the letter is of "questionable legality" but cheered the move regardless.
USA Today - Top Stories
11 hours
euronews
12 hours
Voice Of America
17 hours
Ten of the world’s leading human rights organizations, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, have chosen three human rights defenders from Cambodia, El Salvador and Egypt as this year’s finalists for the prestigious Martin Ennals Award. The three finalists were selected from a field of some 50 human rights defenders. Director of the Martin Ennals Foundation, Michael Khambatta, says the city of Geneva, which will host the award ceremony on October 10, provides project funding of $12,000 for each of the finalists. “The prize money itself is 30,000 francs for the laureate and 10,000 for the finalists ,” said Khambatta. "The idea is not really to give a lot of money. The idea is really to give them credibility, recognition and hopefully protection through widespread publicity.” Khambatta tells VOA each finalist is at serious risks from their respective governments and others who oppose the work they do to promote human rights.
Voice Of America
17 hours
Breitbart News
18 hours
In a new video-message, Pope Francis greets the people of Egypt prior to his upcoming Cairo visit, saying that he intends the visit to be “a witness of my affection, comfort and encouragement for all the Christians of the Middle East.”
ABC News - International
19 hours
Cotswold Journal
19 hours
AN AIRLINE passenger has spoken out after her luggage was "burned" during a journey home from Egypt.
Times of Israel
19 hours
Antiwar.com News
a day
President Trump's previously announced plan to slash State Department funding as part of an effort to free up more money to spend on the military has been published today , with details on the programs and countries seeing a cut detailed alongside some countries seeing significant spending increases. A lot of countries are seeing big cuts in Economic Support Fund spending, with Egypt to lose nearly half of their spending . Some countries, like Poland, are losing 100% of their funding. Despite the emphasis on cuts, however, there are some regions seeing increases. Iraq is seeing the biggest growth in aid, with their aid to rise 144.9%, while Libya is to see a 130% increase. Interestingly enough, US spending in the occupied Palestinian territories is even expected to increase 4.6%. This is quite a surprise, with President Trump having played up his cozy relationship with the Egypt junta, and showing little to no inclination to provide aid to the Palestinians.
AFP News Agency
a day
Egypt's Christians are still mourning fellow members of the Coptic Orthodox community murdered this month by jihadists, but there is also joy ahead of Pope Francis's visit this weekend.
The Event Chronicle
a day
By comparison, the history of the alphabet can only be traced to the 2 nd millennium B.C., which places it around a millennium after the invention of the cuneiform script. Cuneiform inscription on a temple door. (CC BY-SA 4.0) The origin of the alphabet has been traced to ancient Egypt, though it has been pointed out that it was not the ancient Egyptians themselves who invented the alphabet. At that time, the Egyptians were using hieroglyphs. This system consisted of both logograms (a letter / symbol / sign that can be used to represent an entire word) and phonemes. Hieroglyphs. Stele of Minnakht, Chief of the Scribes(c. 1321 BC) (CC BY-SA 3.0) It has been suggested that the earliest alphabetic system was based on the Egyptian hieroglyphs. This system, which has been namedProto-Sinaitic’, is speculated to have been developed either during the 19 th century BC by Canaanite workers living in the Sinai Peninsula, or during the 15 th century BC by Semitic workers living in Central Egypt.
BBC News 24
a day
Organs are hard to transport, but we're told they can be exported to buyers around the world. All refugees are flown to nearby countries, like Egypt, on fake papers to have surgery there. The Middle East is becoming a hotspot in.
Global News
a day
Times of Israel
a day
France 24
a day
A Saudi novelist has won the International Prize for Arabic Fiction, becoming the third author in 10 years from the kingdom to grab the Arab world's most prestigious literary award. Mohammed Hasan Alwan won for his novel "A Small Death", which is a fictionalised account of the life of a Sufi scholar and philosopher, Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi, from his birth in Muslim Spain in the 12th century until his death in Damascus. The novel follows Ibn Arabi's mystic Sufi experience and heroic travels from Andalusia to Azerbaijan, via Morocco, Egypt, the Hijaz in today's western Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iraq and Turkey, according to an abstract posted on the prize website. "Of a sensitive and anxious nature, Muhyiddin struggles with inner turmoil throughout the course of his travels," the abstract said. Though "90 percent of the novel is fiction," Alwan said after receiving the award "I felt the pain while writing it.
Washington Free Beacon
a day
S. disengagement from the embattled nation would widen the opening for Russian involvement and create conditions likely to perpetuate the spread of ISIS. U.S. Africa Command released its 2017 posture statement in March, declaring instability in Libya and North Africa the "most significant near-term threat" to the United States and its allies in the region. The command warned that Libya's precarious security situation has created spillover effects in Tunisia, Egypt, and most of western North Africa, enabling the flow of foreign fighters and migrants to Europe. "The notion of the problems of Libya spilling over is really profound—we're talking about a number of U.S. interests in the region. [It's] really this epicenter that effects the surrounding region." Wehrey testified. The post Senior Lawmakers Urge U.S. Engagement in Libya appeared first on Washington Free Beacon .