Ars Technica UK
4 hours
Enlarge (credit: GCHQ) GCHQ boss Robert Hannigan only took on the post in April 2014, but on Monday—in a surprise move—he quit the job, citing "personal reasons." He won't be handing in his (encryption) keys until a successor is found, GCHQ said. In a letter to the UK's foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, Hannigan said that he was "proud" of the work he has overseen at the eavesdropping concrete doughnut. He flagged up the National Cyber Security Centre as one of GCHQ's "achievements" under his tenure. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica
4 hours
Enlarge / Close up of cancer cells in the cervix, the portion of the uterus that is attached to the top of the vagina. (credit: Getty | American Cancer Society ) Cervical cancer is 77 percent more deadly for black women and 44 percent more deadly for white women than previously thought, researchers report today in the journal Cancer . But the lethal boosts arent from more women actually dying than before—they’re from scientists correcting their own calculation error. In the past, their estimates didnt account for women who had undergone hysterectomies—which almost always removes the cervix, and with it the risk of getting cervical cancer. “We dont include men in our calculation because they are not at risk for cervical cancer and by the same measure, we shouldnt include women who dont have a cervix ,” Anne F. Rositch, the study's lead author and an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins told the New York Times . Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica UK
7 hours
Enlarge (credit: Stephen Brashear / Getty Images News) A federal judge in Seattle is set to hear arguments Monday morning from the Department of Justice as to why he should halt Microsoft’s efforts to allow it to tell users, in most cases, when the government demands customer information. In recent years, Microsoft has been rather outspoken against what it views as overbroad government surveillance and has taken the government to court as needed. This case, known as Microsoft v. Department of Justice , marks yet another instance of those challenges. As of now, Microsoft says, when the government presents it with legal demands for user data held in online storage, those court orders often come with a gag order that has no end date—which it claims is a breach of the First and Fourth Amendments. The company compares this policy to older government attempts to access purely analog information (such as paper documents in a file cabinet), where the "government had to give notice when it sought private information and communications, except in the rarest of circumstances.
Ars Technica UK
8 hours
Enlarge (credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Twitter has apparently fixed a glitch that forced roughly half a million of its users to follow the reality-TV-star-turned-US-president Donald Trump against their will. The struggling company was forced on Saturday to deny that it had been deliberately garnishing Trump's numbers on his official @POTUS account, and said it had made mistakes in a complex attempt to transfer followers to the @POTUS44 account of outgoing president Barack Obama. In total, an estimated 560,000 users found themselves suddenly subjected to Trump's early-morning witterings against their will, after he took control of the presidency's official Twitter bully pulpit on Friday. It is safe to say that many of them were not at all happy about the situation, with Twitter barraged by complaints. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica UK
9 hours
Enlarge (credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images) Robotics, 5G tech, smart energy, and artificial intelligence will—as promised late last year by the UK's prime minister Theresa May—be showered in R&D cash from a multi-billion pound taxpayer-funded pot. The PM said in November that £2 billion per year would be set aside for research and development up to 2020 —the end of the current parliament's term. Number 10 said: "This fund is part of £4.7 billion of additional R&D funding announced by the prime minister in November, a bigger increase than in any parliament since 1979." May's government hopes to emulate the setup that already exists for Britain's automotive and aerospace industries, which are backed up by research institutions and have little regulatory interference from Whitehall. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica UK
9 hours
Ars Technica UK
10 hours
Enlarge / The Galaxy Note 7 was a financial disaster for Samsung. Update, January 23 : The Galaxy S8 will not launch at Mobile World Congress, Samsung has confirmed. With a couple of exceptions, the company has typically used the trade show—which runs from February 27 to March 2 in 2017—to launch its flagship Android smartphones. The current Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge made their debut at the show in 2016. Samsung has not indicated when and where it will announce the Galaxy S8 instead, but shaky rumours from earlier this month tipped the phone for an April 15 launch in New York. The Galaxy S4 was unveiled at an event in New York back in 2013. In other news, Samsung confirmed that faulty batteries from two suppliers were to blame for flaws in the Galaxy Note 7 that wiped $5.3 billion off its operating profit. The company is introducing a deeper "8-point battery safety check" for future devices, which may have contributed to the revised launch period for the Galaxy S8. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica
10 hours
Enlarge (credit: Stephen Brashear / Getty Images News) A federal judge in Seattle is set to hear arguments Monday morning from the Department of Justice as to why he should halt Microsoft’s efforts to allow it to tell users, in most cases, when the government demands customer information. In recent years, Microsoft has been rather outspoken against what it views as overbroad government surveillance and has taken the government to court as needed. This case, known as Microsoft v. Department of Justice , marks yet another instance of those challenges. As of now, Microsoft says, when the government presents it with legal demands for user data held in online storage, those court orders often come with a gag order that has no end date—which it claims is a breach of the First and Fourth Amendments. The company compares this policy to older government attempts to access purely analog information (such as paper documents in a file cabinet), where the "government had to give notice when it sought private information and communications, except in the rarest of circumstances.
Ars Technica UK
12 hours
Enlarge (credit: Ed Giles / Getty Images News) A Kansas City man was sentenced Thursday to three years in prison after he pleaded guilty in September 2016 to pointing a laser at a local police helicopter. Jordan Clarence Rogers has now joined the ranks of people who have been convicted of laser strikes relative to the thousands of incidents that are reported to the Federal Aviation Administration every year. The federal government takes such laser strikes very seriously and prosecutes cases when and where it can. The Department of Justice told Ars that more than 28,000 laser illumination incidents in the United States have been reported to the Federal Aviation Administration between 2011 and 2015. But as of 2014, only 134 arrests were made, and there were only 80 convictions. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica UK
a day
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge / The landed Falcon 9 rocket that launched the Iridium satellites on Jan. 14, 2017. (credit: SpaceX) After successfully returning to flight on Jan. 14th, SpaceX will make its next launch from Cape Canaveral no earlier than Jan. 30th. With this mission from a new pad at Launch Complex 39A, SpaceX will loft the EchoStar 23 communications satellite to geostationary transfer orbit. This is a heavy satellite, weighing 5.5 metric tons, and getting it out to about 40,000km from the surface of the Earth will require pretty much all of the lift capacity of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. This would leave almost no propellant for the Falcon 9 rocket to fire its engines to slow down, make a controlled descent through the Earth's atmosphere, and attempt a difficult landing on a drone ship. On Saturday, in response to a question on Twitter, SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk confirmed that the upcoming EchoStar launch will therefore indeed be expendable.
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge / The landed Falcon 9 rocket that launched the Iridium satellites on Jan. 14, 2017. (credit: SpaceX) After successfully returning to flight on Jan. 14th, SpaceX will make its next launch from Cape Canaveral no earlier than Jan. 30th. With this mission from a new pad at Launch Complex 39A, SpaceX will loft the EchoStar 23 communications satellite to geostationary transfer orbit. This is a heavy satellite, weighing 5.5 metric tons, and getting it out to about 40,000km from the surface of the Earth will require pretty much all of the lift capacity of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. This would leave almost no propellant for the Falcon 9 rocket to fire its engines to slow down, make a controlled descent through the Earth's atmosphere, and attempt a difficult landing on a drone ship. On Saturday, in response to a question on Twitter, SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk confirmed that the upcoming EchoStar launch will therefore indeed be expendable.
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge / The landed Falcon 9 rocket that launched the Iridium satellites on Jan. 14, 2017. (credit: SpaceX) After successfully returning to flight on Jan. 14th, SpaceX will make its next launch from Cape Canaveral no earlier than Jan. 30th. With this mission from a new pad at Launch Complex 39A, SpaceX will loft the EchoStar 23 communications satellite to geostationary transfer orbit. This is a heavy satellite, weighing 5.5 metric tons, and getting it out to about 40,000km from the surface of the Earth will require pretty much all of the lift capacity of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. This would leave almost no propellant for the Falcon 9 rocket to fire its engines to slow down, make a controlled descent through the Earth's atmosphere, and attempt a difficult landing on a drone ship. On Saturday, in response to a question on Twitter, SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk confirmed that the upcoming EchoStar launch will therefore indeed be expendable.
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge (credit: Jeremy Reimer) More than 30-plus years after it debuted, the Amiga continues to fascinate all sorts of computer lovers. For years our Jeremy Reimer has been thoroughly documenting its unique journey in his reoccurring series, and this is his latest entry. If new to the saga, start with part one (on the machine's genesis ) and make sure to read the latest entry ( part nine on the Video Toaster ) before digging in. As the 1990s began, Commodore should have been flying high. The long-awaited new Amiga models with better graphics, the A1200 and A4000, were finally released in 1992. Sales responded by increasing 17 percent over the previous year. The Video Toaster had established a niche in desktop video editing that no other computer platform could match, and the new Toaster 4000 promised to be even better than before. After a rocky start, the Amiga seemed to be hitting its stride.
Ars Technica UK
a day
Enlarge (credit: Paul Jansen ) Adam MacLeod is an associate professor at Faulkner University’s Thomas Goode Jones School of Law and author of Property and Practical Reason (Cambridge University Press). This post originally appeared in Public Discourse, the online journal of the Witherspoon Institute of Princeton, NJ and is reprinted with permission. The traffic-camera ticket: like a parking ticket, it looks lawful enough. When they receive one, most people simply write the check. It seems like the sensible and law-abiding thing to do. But this is not a parking ticket. In legal terms, it is not a proceeding in rem —against your car. It is a legal action against you personally. And before you pay the fine, you might want to hear my story. Read 34 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica UK
2 days
Ars Technica
2 days
Enlarge / The game's rather colorful characters. (credit: Tom Mendelsohn) Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com —and let us know what you think. The Japanese have a reputation for appreciating the toilet. The poop emoji is a creation of theirs, as is Everyone Poops —that famous kids book you almost certainly read as a young 'un—while their TV comedies have a reputation for going heavy on the ordure. Japan is also the home of those space-age lavatories with heated seats and two dozen bidet settings , and it's the birthplace of this appetizing dessert treat . So no one should be surprised that, as we toured last October's Essen gaming fair, the largest board games show on earth, our eyes were caught by a Japanese game called Toire o Yogoshita nowa Dareda? (Or, in English, Who Soiled the Toilet? ). Naturally, we had to try it. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica
2 days
Enlarge / Magnets, how do they work? (credit: Paul Downey (Flickr) ) Magnetic media, in the form of disk and tape drives, has been the dominant way of storing bits. But the speed and low power of flash memory has been displacing it from consumer systems, and various forms of long-term memory are in development that are even faster. But a new paper suggests that magnetic media may still be competitive—you just have to stop reading and writing it with magnets. Using a specific form of garnet and some ultrafast laser pulses, a Dutch-Polish team of researchers performed what they suspect is the fastest read/write of magnetic media ever. And, for good measure, the process was extremely energy efficient. Heat is actually a problem for both hard drives and flash. Although it doesn't create a problem in most consumer systems, dealing with excess heat is a major issue in data centers.
Ars Technica UK
3 days
Enlarge (credit: Béatrix Midant-Reynes, Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale) Around 3,500 BCE, the ancient Egyptians began to practice a ritual that has long perplexed archaeologists. They buried their dead in recycled ceramic food jars similar to Greek amphorae. For decades, scholars believed that only the poor used these large storage containers, and they did so out of necessity. But in a recent article for the journal Antiquity , Ronika Power and Yann Tristant debunk that idea. They offer a new perspective on pot burial. Burial in pots took many forms. Egyptians buried their dead in all types of ceramic vessels, and, sometimes, the body was simply placed underneath a pot in a grave. Though pot burials were popular, especially for children, people also used coffins and even stone-lined pits to inter their loved ones. The practice of pot burial probably came to Egypt from the Levant region, where pot burials date back to at least 2,000 years before the first known examples in Egypt.
Ars Technica
3 days
Enlarge (credit: Kaléo ) As public outcry over the skyrocketing price of Mylan’s Epipens hit fever pitch last fall, Ars noted that there was an upcoming competitor: Auvi-Q by Kaléo. But we were pretty confident back then that Kaléo was not going to offer an affordable epinephrine auto-injector alternative, given that the company has a well-documented history of price gouging on life-saving medications, too. Nevertheless, Auvi-Q’s price may still send some jaws toward the floor. In an announcement Thursday, the company revealed that Auvi-Q will have a $4,500 list price for a two-pack and will be available February 14 for anyone who wants to buy one. Auvi-Qs were initially introduced in 2013 but were pulled from the market following dosage issues. The devices are slim and rectangular, easy to slip into pockets, and provide a voice-prompt system to guide through a life-saving epinephrine injection.
Ars Technica
3 days
Enlarge (credit: Kaléo ) As public outcry over the skyrocketing price of Mylan’s Epipens hit fever pitch last fall, Ars noted that there was upcoming competitor: Auvi-Q by Kaléo. But we were pretty confident back then that Kaléo was not going to offer an affordable epinephrine auto-injector alternative, given that the company has a well-documented history of price gouging on life-saving medications, too. Nevertheless, Auvi-Q’s price may still send some jaws toward the floor. In an announcement Thursday, the company revealed that Auvi-Q will have a $4,500 list price for a two-pack and will be available February 14 for anyone who wants to buy one. Auvi-Qs were initially introduced in 2013 but were pulled from the market following dosage issues. The devices are slim and rectangular, easy to slip into pockets, and provide a voice-prompt system to guide through a life-saving epinephrine injection.
Ars Technica
3 days
Enlarge (credit: Kaléo ) As public outcry over the skyrocketing price of Mylan’s Epipens hit fever pitch last fall, Ars noted that there was upcoming competitor: Auvi-Q by Kaléo. But we were pretty confident back then that Kaléo was not going to offer an affordable epinephrine auto-injector alternative, given that the company has a well-documented history of price gouging on life-saving medications, too. Nevertheless, Auvi-Q’s price may still send some jaws toward the floor. In an announcement Thursday, the company revealed that Auvi-Q will have a $4,500 list price and will be available February 14 for anyone who wants to buy one. Auvi-Qs were initially introduced in 2013 but were pulled from the market following dosage issues. The devices are slim and rectangular, easy to slip into pockets, and provide a voice-prompt system to guide through a life-saving epinephrine injection.
Ars Technica
3 days
Ars Technica
3 days
Enlarge / A scene from Prelude to Axanar . (credit: Axanar ) On Friday, litigants announced a settlement to end a contentious © lawsuit over a short film and a proposed feature-length film based in the Star Trek universe. The lawsuit was filed last year and involves Star Trek fan-fiction producer Axanar Productions, Paramount Studios, and CBS. The parties did not disclose all the details of the settlement, which is sealed from the public record. But a joint statement from Axanar and the plaintiffs noted that the defendantsacknowledge that both films were not approved by Paramount or CBS and that both works crossed boundaries acceptable to CBS and Paramount relating to © law.” A spokesperson from Axanar told Ars Technica in an e-mail “we’re not paying anything,” with respect to the settlement. The settlement will also require the fanfic producer to “make substantial changes to Axanar to resolve this litigation.