Ars Technica
11 minutes
Enlarge / Jupiter's chaotic, cyclone-filled poles. (credit: J.E.P. Connerney et al., Science) It's hard to imagine that the Solar System's biggest planet, which provided Galileo with his first key astronomic observations, has a lot of secrets left 450 years later. Yet, despite countless hours spent peering through telescopes and numerous robotic visitors, there's a lot we still don't know about Jupiter. Most notably, we didn't even have a decent picture of the planet's poles, and we have little idea of what its interior might look like. Thanks to the arrival of the Juno probe, however, that's starting to change. After just a few orbits, Juno has imaged both poles, tracked some of the dynamics of its atmosphere, and started providing evidence of what may lie at the crushing depths of the planet's interior. Staring at the clouds Earlier this year, Juno performed the closest approach to Jupiter ever made by human hardware, passing within 5,000km of Jupiter's cloud tops.
Ars Technica
41 minutes
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an hour
Enlarge / Diegomez (credit: Electronic Frontier Foundation ) A Colombian biologist was facing up to eight years in prison for sharing a scientist's thesis on the online documents portal Scribd. But the Electronic Frontier Foundation is reporting that Diegomez has been cleared of criminal © violations in a country that, unlike the US, has no broad fair-use defense to infringement allegations. "After a long legal battle, Diego was able to breathe a sigh of relief today as he was cleared of the criminal charges that he faced for this harmless act of sharing scholarly research," the EFF announced . Thousands signed an EFF petition supportingmez. In 2011, he uploaded a master's thesis of another scientist, and a drawn-out legal saga in Colombia ensued. A judge in Bogotá found him innocent of the charges Wednesday. "I have been cleared. I am innocent," Gómez said, according to Nature . Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments
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2 hours
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3 hours
Enlarge T-Mobile has announced the launch of its "Digits" program on May 31. Digits is a revamp of how T-Mobile phone numbers work, virtualizing customer numbers so they can work across multiple devices. It sounds a lot like Google Voice—rather than having a phone number tied to a single SIM card or a device, numbers are now account-based, and you can "log in" to your phone number on several devices. T-Mobile says the new phone number system will work "across virtually all connected devices," allowing multiple phones, tablets, and PCs to get texts and calls. This means T-Mobile needs apps across all those platforms, with the press release citing "native seamless integration" in Samsung Android phones, Android and iOS apps, and a browser interface for PCs. The new phone number system is free to all T-Mobile customers. Customers can also buy an extra phone number for $10 or by signing up to the $5-per-month " T-Mobile One Plus " package, which is a bundle of random extra features like mobile hotspot and in-flight Wi-Fi.
Ars Technica
3 hours
Enlarge T-Mobile has announced the launch of its "Digits" program on May 31. Digits is a revamp of how T-Mobile phone numbers work, virtualizing customer numbers so they can work across multiple devices. It sounds a lot like Google Voice—rather than having a phone number tied to a single SIM card or a device, numbers are now account-based, and you can "log in" to your phone number on several devices. T-Mobile says the new phone number system will work "across virtually all connected devices," allowing multiple phones, tablets, and PCs to get texts and calls. This means T-Mobile needs apps across all those platforms, with the press release citing "native seamless integration" in Samsung Android phones, Android and iOS apps, and a browser interface for PCs. The new phone number system is free to all T-Mobile customers. Customers can also buy an extra phone number for $10 or by signing up to the $5-per-month " T-Mobile One Plus " package, which is a bundle of random extra features like mobile hotspot and in-flight Wi-Fi.
Ars Technica UK
5 hours
Enlarge / Good ol' BBC, wheeling out Dad's Army whenever it's even slightly apropos. Update, May 25, 2017: The BBC Store, despite launching just 18 months ago, has closed down. There was no warning; if you visit the BBC Store website you can no longer buy anything. All you get is a farewell message. People who bought digital box sets from the BBC Store were sent an e-mail about the sudden closure. Those customers will be able to watch their purchases until November 1, but after that they will disappear into the DRM digital ether. Thankfully, customers will be offered a full refund, too. (It isn't clear if the refund will be automatic on November 1, or if you'll have to log in and manually ask for it.) A spokesperson for BBC Worldwide, the commercial subsidiary of the BBC, said: “Since the appetite for BBC shows on VOD and other third party platforms is growing in the UK and abroad, it doesnt make sense for us to invest further in BBC Store where demand has not been as strong as we’d hoped in a rapidly changing market.
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Ars Technica UK
7 hours
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Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Thinkstock) Note: This piece is from our US colleagues. Please adjust your internal decoding of the words " conservative " and " liberal " for the next few thousand words. He doesnt start with an apocalyptic description of future impacts when he talks to people about climate change, but, for some audiences, University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor of Environmental Studies Calvin DeWitt does turn to the book of Revelations. “I’ll have a white-out pen in my pocket, and I’ll have them read Revelation chapter 11, verse 18. It’s a description of the sounding of the last trumpet, as you hear in Handel’s ‘Messiah,' and the end verse says, ‘The time has come for destroying those who destroy the Earth,’” DeWitt told me. “And so, I say, ‘I have a white-out pen here for anyone who would like to correct their Bible.’” DeWitt sees his faith as fundamental to, rather than in conflict with, his concern about climate change.
Ars Technica UK
9 hours
Enlarge / Ke Jie (left) prepares to make his first move against AlphaGo (right). What I don't know is why we're not all writing about Google's silent launch of incredibly lifelike humanoid robots. (credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images) Update, May 25, 10am BST: Google's AlphaGo has defeated Ke Jie again, confirming what we already know: AlphaGo is the best Go player in the world. Chinese wunderkind Ke did provide a glimmer of hope for humanity, though. DeepMind's cofounder Demis Hassabis said that, according to AlphaGo's internal evaluations, Ke played "perfectly" at the beginning of the game. Later, he tweeted that Ke Jie "pushed AlphaGo right to the limit." But then, as the grand vizier of Earth's new robot sultan, he would say that. At the post-game press conference, Hassabis expounded on that thought: “For the first 100 moves it was the closest we’ve seen anyone play against the Master version of AlphaGo." Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Ars Technica UK
12 hours
Enlarge (credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) The price of Bitcoin, the most popular digital crytpo-currency, has skyrocketed this year. According to Coindesk, bitcoins are currently trading for $2,483 per coin. The price is an all-time record, and the remarkable valuation blows earlier price spikes out of the water. Bitcoins have more than doubled since the beginning of 2017, when they hovered around $1,000 per coin. Bitcoin broke the $2,000-per-coin barrier on Saturday. The run-up has led to increased interest in lesser-known digital currencies, like Etherium and Ripple. Ethereum, which is backed by large companies working on blockchain projects, has jumped in value from $8.24 at the beginning of the year to $203.30, according to CNBC . Ethereum prices began climbing in March, around the time when Bitcoin investors started "getting jittery" about whether Bitcoin software would be able to handle the increased level of transactions.
Bournemouth Daily Echo
14 hours
PLANS to enlarge a house have been thrown out after being brandedunneighbourly”.
Ars Technica
19 hours
Ars Technica
19 hours
Enlarge / It was either this or yet another picture of some lightning. (credit: Airwolfhound ) We're big fans of Thunderbolt 3 here at Ars, attracted by its enormous versatility, high performance, and the promise of being a single port and a single cable that can do it all. While the technology is becoming increasingly common on high-end portables, it's still far from ubiquitous. Intel has announced a couple of measures that should go a long way toward boosting Thunderbolt 3's adoption. The first step is straightforward and, in our view, a long time coming: the company is going to finally integrate Thunderbolt 3 into its processors. Although the first Thunderbolt 3 chips, codenamed "Alpine Ridge," were released in the third quarter of 2015, last year's Kaby Lake chipsets, including the high-end Z270, didn't include any native Thunderbolt 3 support.
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a day
Enlarge (credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) The price of Bitcoin, the most popular the digital crytpo-currency, has skyrocketed this year. According to Coindesk, bitcoins are currently trading for $2,483 per coin. The price is an all-time record, and the remarkable valuation blows earlier price spikes out of the water. Bitcoins have more than doubled since the beginning of 2017, when they hovered around $1,000 per coin. Bitcoin broke the $2,000-per-coin barrier on Saturday. The run-up has led to increased interest in lesser-known digital currencies, like Etherium and Ripple. Ethereum, which is backed by large companies working on blockchain projects, has jumped in value from $8.24 at the beginning of the year to $203.30, according to CNBC . Ethereum prices began climbing in March, around the time when Bitcoin investors started "getting jittery" about whether Bitcoin software would be able to handle the increased level of transactions.
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge (credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) The price of Bitcoin, the most popular the digital crytpo-currency, has skyrocketed this year. According to Coindesk, bitcoins are currently trading for $2,483 per coin. The price is an all-time record, and the remarkable valuation blows earlier price spikes out of the water. Bitcoins have more than doubled since the beginning of 2017, when they hovered around $1,000 per coin. Bitcoin broke the $2,000-per-coin barrier on Saturday. The run-up has led to increased interest in lesser-known digital currencies, like Etherium and Ripple. Ethereum, which is backed by large companies working on blockchain projects, has jumped in value from $8.24 at the beginning of the year to $203.30, according to CNBC . Ethereum prices began climbing in March, around the time when Bitcoin investors started "getting jittery" about whether Bitcoin software would be able to handle the increased level of transactions.
Ars Technica UK
a day
Enlarge (credit: Getty | Bloomberg ) At least three federal agencies are now investigating Universal Health Services over allegations that its psychiatric hospitals keep patients longer than needed in order to milk insurance companies, Buzzfeed News reports . According to several sources, the UHS' chain of psychiatric facilities—the largest in the country—will delay patients' discharge dates until the day insurance coverage runs out, regardless of the need of the patient. Because the hospitals are reimbursed per day, the practice extracts the maximum amount of money from insurance companies. It also can be devastating to patients, who are needlessly kept from returning to their jobs and families. To cover up the scheme, medical notes are sometimes altered and doctors come up with excuses, such as medication changes, sources allege. Employees say they repeatedly hear the phrase: “dont leave days on the table.
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a day
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Thomas Jackson) Lobbyists for Google, Facebook, and other websites are trying to stop the implementation of a proposed law that would strengthen consumer privacy protections online. Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) last week proposed a bill that would require broadband providers and websites to obtain users' opt-in consent before they use Web browsing history and application usage history for advertising and other purposes or before they share that information with other entities. The rule in Blackburn's " BROWSER Act " would be similar to one that was scheduled to be applied to ISPs later this year until Republicans in Congress and President Donald Trump took action to stop it from being implemented . Currently, websites must let visitors opt out of the use and sharing of browsing history, but they don't need to obtain opt-in consent before using browsing history to deliver targeted ads.
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge (credit: Git ) Back in February, Microsoft made the surprising announcement that the Windows development team was going to move to using the open source Git version control system for Windows development. A little over three months after that first revelation, and about 90 percent of the Windows engineering team has made the switch. The switch to Git has been driven by a couple of things. In 2013, the company embarked on its OneCore project, unifying its different strands of Windows development and making the operating system a more cleanly modularized, layered platform. At the time, Microsoft was using SourceDepot, a customized version of the commercial Perforce version control system, for all its major projects. SourceDepot couldn't handle a project the size of Windows, so rather than having the whole operating system in a single repository, the Windows code was actually divided among 65 different repositories, with a kind of virtualization layer on top to produce a unified view of all the code.
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge (credit: Git ) Back in February, Microsoft made the surprising announcement that the Windows development team was going to move to using the open source Git version control system for Windows development. A little over three months after that first revelation, and about 90 percent of the Windows engineering team has made the switch. The switch to Git has been driven by a couple of things. In 2013, the company embarked on its OneCore project, unifying its different strands of Windows development and making the operating system a more cleanly modularized, layered platform. At the time, Microsoft was using SourceDepot, a customized version of the commercial Perforce version control system, for all its major projects. SourceDepot couldn't handle a project the size of Windows, so rather than having the whole operating system in a single repository, the Windows code was actually divided among 65 different repositories, with a kind of virtualization layer on top to produce a unified view of all the code.
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge / If Niantic detects your bot account, common Pokémon like this Pidgey are all you'll be able to see in the game. Pokémon Go developer Niantic appears to have opened up a new front in its ongoing war against third-party tools and trackers that use bot accounts to reveal where in-game Pokémon are hiding in the real world. Players are reporting that detected and flagged accounts are being limited so they can only see common Pokémon—not the most coveted, rarer beasts. Pokemon Go Hub reported on the new security measure earlier this week , showing screenshots where two different accounts in the same exact location showed different Pokémon on their "nearby" lists. The site estimates that tens to hundreds of thousands of accounts may have been blinded in this way, based on reports from inside the Pokémon Go hacking community. That said, reports suggest the enforcement has been somewhat sporadic, with "some botters claiming zero accounts blinded, and others reporting complete annihilation of their account farm," according to Pokémon Go Hub.
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge / If Niantic detects your bot account, common Pokémon like this Pidgey are all you'll be able to see in the game. Pokémon Go developer Niantic appears to have opened up a new front in its ongoing war against third-party tools and trackers that use bot accounts to reveal where in-game Pokémon are hiding in the real world. Players are reporting that detected and flagged accounts are being limited so they can only see common Pokémon—not the most coveted, rarer beasts. Pokemon Go Hub reported on the new security measure earlier this week , showing screenshots where two different accounts in the same exact location showed different Pokémon on their "nearby" lists. The site estimates that tens to hundreds of thousands of accounts may have been blinded in this way, based on reports from inside the Pokémon Go hacking community. That said, reports suggest the enforcement has been somewhat sporadic, with "some botters claiming zero accounts blinded, and others reporting complete annihilation of their account farm," according to Pokémon Go Hub.