IBTimes
9 minutes
Eric Frein fatally shot an officer and wounded another before going on the run.
Adweek
an hour
The Economist - Business
an hour
KEEPING cool in the heat of war is not easy. That might help explain why LafargeHolcim, a French-Swiss cement-maker, blundered so badly while running operations in Syria as fighting raged. On April 24th the firm said that its chief executive, Eric Olsen, will go, a casualty of a growing scandal over its activities in the country. The board of the world’s biggest cement producer stated only last month that Mr Olsen was not responsible for, nor aware of, wrongdoing by the firm in Syria. But public pressure has been increasing, notably after Jean-Luc Mélenchon, a left-wing candidate in France’s presidential election, attacked the firm and its “damned cement” in a television debate on April 4th. François Fillon, a pro-business rival, agreed the firm should be punished if allegations against it proved to be true. At issue is the activity of Lafarge before the firm’s merger with its Swiss rival, Holcim, in 2015.
Voice Of America
an hour
But the center's director, Josh Wheeler, said it's important to also honor less well-known offenses because the award "challenges the assumption held by many that, because of the First Amendment, attempts at censorship are few in the United States." "In fact, such acts occur every day," his statement added. Each year, the group considers hundreds of nominations before whittling down to the winners. Atheists' comments Bradley County, Tennessee, Sheriff Eric Watson won after being accused of deleting comments by atheists and blocking atheist commentators from an official county Facebook post about the Easter holiday. The county admitted no wrongdoing but agreed to pay $41,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by a national atheist organization. "Sheriff Watson should have known better than to censor comments from the Facebook page because they reflected beliefs different from his own," the center said.
Daily Star - Football
an hour
The Economist - Business
an hour
KEEPING cool in the heat of war is not easy. That might help explain why LafargeHolcim, a French-Swiss cement-maker, blundered so badly while running operations in Syria as fighting raged. On April 24th the firm said that its chief executive, Eric Olsen, will go, a casualty of a growing scandal over its activities in the country. The board of the world’s biggest cement producer stated only last month that Mr Olsen was not responsible for, nor aware of, wrongdoing by the firm in Syria. But public pressure has been increasing, notably after Jean-Luc Mélenchon, a left-wing candidate in France’s presidential election, attacked the firm and its “damned cement” in a television debate on April 4th. François Fillon, a pro-business rival, agreed the firm should be punished if allegations against it proved to be true. At issue is the activity of Lafarge before the firm’s merger with its Swiss rival, Holcim, in 2015.
Adweek
2 hours
South China Morning Post
2 hours
Voice Of America
4 hours
His daughter and son-in-law, both White House advisers, are also holding onto significant business assets. And Trump's adult sons run his Trump Organization. Trump officials have offered varying explanations for why the president does not disclosure his returns. White House senior counselor Kellyanne Conway said in a television interview in January that the fact that he won the election without putting out the information shows that “people didn't care” about it. Trump's sons Eric and Donald Trump Jr. have made similar points in various interviews, though recent polling suggests otherwise. ‘A waste of timeThere's evidence the president has been thinking about the issue in recent weeks. He asked his friend and Las Vegas business partner Phil Ruffin, a fellow billionaire, whether he should put out the returns, Ruffin said. “I advised him not to,” Ruffin said.
South China Morning Post
4 hours
Manchester Evening News - Sport
5 hours
Man Utd vs Manchester City build up looks at how the Ivorian could have ended up playing for the Blues.
Daily Mail - Home
5 hours
BBC Two England
5 hours
Daily Mail - Australia
5 hours
WhoWhatWhy
6 hours
The lawyers were Frederick Oberlander, who had disseminated sealed information from Sater’s file, and Richard E. Lerner, who had defended Oberlander. (Oberlander had initiated the litigation against Bayrock that sought to unseal Sater’s file.) Indeed, the veil of secrecy had grown so thick by 2011 that in response to a petition from the Associated Press, a judge appointed by the Second Circuit to enforce its orders refused to allow Oberlander and Lerner to even discuss the contents of the materials the judge himself had just ordered unsealed . Since then, parts of Sater’s criminal file have become public — although the government remains extraordinarily tight-lipped. The reason for the continuing secrecy can probably be found in the 2015 confirmation hearings of Loretta Lynch, who succeeded Eric Holder as US Attorney General under Obama. In a letter responding to a written question from Utah Senator Orrin Hatch, a senior Republican member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, she made it clear that there was much sensitive information in Sater’s criminal file.
Politico
6 hours
Another big challenge in protecting TrumpcodenamedMogul” to commemorate his billionaire business backgroundstarts with the way he’s been traveling around the country. While the president has managed to keep hotel costs down by spending all his nights since inauguration at either the White House or his South Florida seaside retreat, it’s the recurring weekend trips to his private Mar-a-Lago club that are giving current and former Secret Service agents some pause. “I used to joke if we dont know where we’re going then the jackal doesnt either,” Bongino said. “Patterns always hurt.” The Secret Servicebattered by years of bad public relations tied to fence jumpers, prostitutes and the lowest morale of any government sub-agency — is also spread painfully thin as it acclimates to the Trump era. A third of the New York field office’s 200-plus staffers are being pulled on any given day from their regular duties, including criminal investigations, to protect the Trump family members based in Manhattan, including Melania Trump and 11-year old Barron Trump in Trump Tower, and adult sons Eric and Donald Trump Jr.
Daily Star - Football
6 hours
Politico
6 hours
Another big challenge in protecting TrumpcodenamedMogul” to commemorate his billionaire business backgroundstarts with the way he’s been traveling around the country. While the president has managed to keep hotel costs down by spending all his nights since inauguration at either the White House or his South Florida seaside retreat, it’s the recurring weekend trips to his private Mar-a-Lago club that are giving current and former Secret Service agents some pause. “I used to joke if we dont know where we’re going then the jackal doesnt either,” Bongino said. “Patterns always hurt.” The Secret Servicebattered by years of bad public relations tied to fence jumpers, prostitutes and the lowest morale of any government sub-agency — is also spread painfully thin as it acclimates to the Trump era. A third of the New York field office’s 200-plus staffers are being pulled on any given day from their regular duties, including criminal investigations, to protect the Trump family members based in Manhattan, including Melania Trump and 11-year old Barron Trump in Trump Tower, and adult sons Eric and Donald Trump Jr.
Sky News
6 hours
pass the instruments that are not impossible, given the City of London's importance in the financial sector, I think we can come up with a deal. Otherwise what we can't ensure with Europe is mutually assured destruction and that's not in anybody's interest. Eric Pickles, thanks for joining us
Sky News
7 hours
And joining me now is Eric Pickles. Of course, leading Conservative MP, former Cabinet minister who's decided not to put himself forward in Essex after 25 years as their MP
Sky News
7 hours
We'll get a few words from him before I speak to Eric Pickles, who's here
Daily Mail - Transfer news
7 hours
Eric Bailly will be tasked with stopping Manchester City score on Thursday night but he could have easily been lining up for United's rivals if it wasn't for Jose Mourinho.
Evening Standard
7 hours
It was when Eric Samuel's mother was admitted to Newham General Hospital that his eyes were opened to food poverty in the East End.
Nottingham Evening Post
7 hours
A new chairman with a background in finance is set to take the reins at Nottingham's hospitals.Eric Morton is the new chairman of Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust (NUH) - which operates Queen's Medical Centre and Nottingham City Hospital - and will take up his new role on May 1.Mr Morton, who will replace outgoing chairman Louise Scull after her 12 years on the board, is described as a highly-experienced NHS chief executive with a background in finance and will work to get...