Financial Times - United States
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The story behind the failure of Kraft Heinz to win over the Anglo-Dutch giant
Financial Times - United States
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Financial Times
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The Economic Times
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MUMBAI: India’s mobile-telephony companies are headed for a fresh round of price wars after the country’s richest man said his carrier, Reliance Jio Infocomm, will charge its subscribers from April 1, but at sharply discounted rates. After six months of offering all services for free, a plan that helped Reliance Jio net 100 million subscribers in a record time, chairman Mukesh Ambani on Tuesday said that Reliance Jio would not levy fees on calls. For the next financial year beginning April 1, the company’s existing users and those coming on board this March will continue to get 1 GB of data a day and all of Reliance Jio’s apps for Rs 303 a month and a one-time cost of Rs 99. By contrast, market leader Bharti Airtel offers unlimited calls and 1GB of 4G data at Rs 345 for 28 days. Airtel also offers 30GB of data for 90 days at Rs 1,495. For Rs 349, Bharti’s nearest rival Vodafone offers unlimited calls and 50 MB of 3G or 1GB of 4G data, also for 28 days.
Financial Times
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Financial Times
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Financial Times - China
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Financial Times - China
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Financial Times - Global Economy
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Financial Times - United States
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Three-star army general will have to tread carefully as national security adviser
Financial Times
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Financial Times - United States
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Financial Times - World News
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Financial Times - World News
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Marijuana can be sold in Netherlandscoffee shops’ but growing it has been illegal
Financial Times
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‘Our models are just not that good’, top official tells MPs
Financial Times
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Financial Times
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Financial Times - Markets
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Financial Times - Global Economy
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Financial Times - World News
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Companies cut round-the-clock services in face of labour shortage
Financial Times
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Futurity
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According to Elliott, historians have gone back and analyzed a number of different cases where groups with a financial conflict of interest either deliberately withheld scientific information or lied about what they knew and even designed studies in order to obtain the results they preferred. The Volkswagen scandal is a good contemporary example of this, along with more historical cases such as the tobacco industry's research around cigarette smoking, he says. Familiar smoke and mirrors' promote e-cigarettes Last year, it was discovered the German automaker was cheating emissions tests by installing a device in diesel engines that could detect when a test was being administered and could change the way the vehicle performed to improve results. This allowed the company to sell its cars in the United States while its engines emitted pollutants up to 40 times above what's accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency.
Financial Times - Markets
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Fears that new rule will backfire to promote dark pools instead of public exchanges