Radar Online
6 hours
Phaedra Parks got a shock when a judge reportedly reversed her divorce from troubled jailbird husband Apollo Nida . In November, The Real Housewives of Atlanta star, 43, had said her divorce from Nida, 38, the father of her two kids, had been finalized. But not so fast! As E! News reports , a judge recently tossed out the divorce judgement because he was troubled that Nida was not served with documents notifying him the divorce was final. So what does the RHOA star (and attorney) do now about her unpredictable husband, who is reportedly already engaged to a new gal? A rep for Parks told Radar of Nida, It's very confusing why a man who is engaged and enjoys frequent visits with his fiancée would work so aggressively to avoid ending his marriage. Regardless, Phaedra is reviewing her options with her attorney to determine the most efficient path toward ending this marriage so she can move forward and focus on raising strong, healthy and happy children.
Asia Today
10 hours
Voice Of America
11 hours
A court in Cameroon has again adjourned a trial for a foreign reporter accused nearly two years ago of "complicity" with the Boko Haram terrorist group. Ahmed Abba of Radio France International's Hausa language service says he has done nothing wrong, but he has been in custody for nearly five months and faces a death sentence if convicted. His hearing Friday at the Yaounde military court was his first since November. During cross-examination to find out how he got videos and photos purportedly from Boko Haram, Abba said he downloaded some from YouTube and Facebook, while others were being shared on other social media. Asked how he got information security services had discovered on his phone announcing planned attacks that never came to pass, the RFI reporter said all the information he had was shared on social media. Journalist threatened, too Abba questioned why the court did not believe him, adding that he also was threatened by Boko Haram, which might have gotten his telephone number from his Facebook page.
Channel 4
12 hours
one 52-year-old convert's rage or beliefs. The Saudi embassy late last night revealed details of Masood's visits. He spent a year there from November 2005 to 2006. And then another year from April 2008 working as an English teacher
TIME - Top Stories
13 hours
(LONDON) The British man who killed four people during a London rampage had made three trips to Saudi Arabia: He taught English there twice on a work visa and returned on a visa usually granted to those going on a religious pilgrimage. More details about attacker Khalid Masood's travels, confirmed by the Saudi Arabian embassy in Britain, emerged Saturday amid a massive British police effort to discover how a homegrown ex-con with a violent streak became radicalized and why he launched a deadly attack Wednesday on Westminster Bridge. The embassy said he taught English in Saudi Arabia from November 2005 to November 2006 and again from April 2008 to April 2009, with legitimate work visas both times. He then returned to Saudi Arabia for six days in March 2015 on a trip booked through an approved travel agent and made on an Umra visa, usually granted to those on a religious pilgrimage to the country's Islamic holy sites.
Den of Geek
13 hours
The Guardian - Sport
14 hours
• ‘What we dont have to do is win it in the first five minutes,’ says managerScotland have won four points from four games in World Cup qualifying A persecution complex often envelops a manager in trouble but Gordon Strachan cannot blame a disgruntled Scottish support or media for treating Slovenia’s visit to Hampden Park on Sunday as a defining moment for his reign. That responsibility lies with his employer, the SFA chief executive, Stewart Regan, and a sequence of results that have turned World Cup qualification into a distant prospect with four qualifying matches played. “That’s really a must-win game for Scotland,” Regan said last month when looking ahead to the country’s first competitive fixture since the 3-0 defeat by England in November . “We know how important it is to get our campaign back on track. Gordon knows it. The team knows it.” Continue reading...
The Guardian - Network Front
14 hours
• ‘What we dont have to do is win it in the first five minutes,’ says managerScotland have won four points from four games in World Cup qualifying A persecution complex often envelops a manager in trouble but Gordon Strachan cannot blame a disgruntled Scottish support or media for treating Slovenia’s visit to Hampden Park on Sunday as a defining moment for his reign. That responsibility lies with his employer, the SFA chief executive, Stewart Regan, and a sequence of results that have turned World Cup qualification into a distant prospect with four qualifying matches played. “That’s really a must-win game for Scotland,” Regan said last month when looking ahead to the country’s first competitive fixture since the 3-0 defeat by England in November . “We know how important it is to get our campaign back on track. Gordon knows it. The team knows it.” Continue reading...
The Guardian - Sport
15 hours
• ‘What we dont have to do is win it in the first five minutes,’ says managerScotland have just four points from four games in World Cup qualifying A persecution complex often envelops a manager in trouble but Gordon Strachan cannot blame a disgruntled Scottish support or media for treating Slovenia’s visit to Hampden Park as a defining moment for his reign. That responsibility lies with his employer, the SFA chief executive Stewart Regan, and a sequence of results that have turned World Cup qualification into a distant prospect with only four qualifying matches played. “That’s really a must-win game for Scotland,” Regan said last month when looking ahead to the country’s first competitive fixture since the 3-0 defeat by England last November . “We know how important it is to get our campaign back on track. Gordon knows it. The team knows it.
Western Daily Press
15 hours
Have you ever seen anything like this in Somerset? The alarming video footage which you can see in the video above shows a careless lorry driver chance their luck by driving round the wrong side of the roundabout to perform a U-turn. The HGV driver was recorded performing the dangerous manoeuvre on the A30 Chiverton Cross roundabout near Truro, Cornwall. The incident took place at 8:21 am on November 11 2016 and the dashcam footage from a nearby driver was that was then...
Politico
16 hours
Khalid Masood taught English in Saudi Arabia from November 2005 to November 2006 and again from April 2008 to April 2009, a Saudi Embassy statement released late Friday said. Masood had a work visa during those times, and then he returned for six days in March 2015 on a trip booked through an approved travel agent, the embassy said. Saudi security services didnt track him and he didnt have a criminal record there. Before taking the name Masood, he was known as Adrian Elms. He was known for having a violent temper in England and had been convicted at least twice for violent crimes.” http://apne.ws/2ogHyE0 MICHAEL ANTON PROFILE -- ROSIE GRAY in The Atlantic, “The Populist Nationalist on Trump’s National Security Council”: “‘I’m not trying to disparage Ben Rhodes but I always viewed Ben Rhodes as more operational,’ [Steve] Bannon said. In his view, the Obama administration had ‘operationalized the NSC.
The Sun Daily
18 hours
Smith had put on 134 runs for the second wicket with David Warner (56) after Australia lost opener Matt Renshaw in the second over of the day. The unassuming captain underlined his reputation as the world number one Test batsman, reaching his 20th century in the process and his seventh hundred in his last eight Tests against India. The skipper raised his bat and helmet to acknowledge the standing ovation from a grateful Australian dressing room. Smith's efforts meant he remained on top of the batting chart in the series with a whopping 482 runs from seven innings. He finally lost his wicket to spinner Ravichandran Ashwin, with Rahane taking another catch in the slip region. Smith's run in the series has been in contrast to Kohli who managed only 46 runs from three Tests. Before this game, Kohli played 54 Tests on the trot without missing a match since November 2011. — AFP
Voice Of America
19 hours
An Egyptian appeals court suspended a jail sentence on Saturday against the former head of the journalists' union for harboring colleagues wanted by authorities and for spreading false news, judicial sources and a lawyer said. Yehia Qalash and two colleagues were sentenced to two years in jail in November in a case which Amnesty International condemned as a further crackdown on freedom of expression in Egypt. The appeals court on Saturday gave Qalash and the two board members, Khaled al-Balshy and Gamal Abdel Rahim, a one-year suspended jail sentence. Prosecutors had ordered the three men face trial last May, amid efforts by Egyptian authorities to quell rising dissent against army general-turned-president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The charges against them related to a police raid last May on the Journalists' Syndicate to arrest two opposition journalists who had sought shelter there from arrest.
Plymouth Herald
19 hours
The Economic Times
21 hours
So we can marry the two, leverage the reach and infrastructure of a telecom network and are able to sell financial services products through that, you know, that could be a very transformative experience. ET Now: Coming back to the customer centric business that you are in, now that effects of demonetisation have settled down, how do you see the markets or the corporates recovering from the hurdles of demonetisation? Ajay Srinivasan: Demonetisation was a temporary adjustment in many ways and it is clearly adjusted. Take home finance, in the housing finance mortgages business we saw a big slowdown in November because of demonetisation. December was a reasonably strong month and January was an even stronger month. So, in many places we have seen the momentum come back in a very strong way and I think the market has adjusted. But if you look at some of the underlying changes, you will see a greater formalisation of the economy as a result of demonetisation.
Voice Of America
a day
The man who killed four people outside Britain’s Parliament was in Saudi Arabia three times and taught English there, the Middle Eastern country’s embassy said. A Saudi Embassy statement released late Friday said that Khalid Masood taught English in Saudi Arabia from November 2005 to November 2006 and again from April 2008 to April 2009. The embassy said that he had a work visa. It said he returned for six days in March 2015 on a trip booked through an approved travel agent. The Saudi Embassy said that he wasnt tracked by the country’s security services and didnt have a criminal record there. Before taking the name Masood, he was known as Adrian Elms. He was known for having a violent temper in England and had been convicted at least twice for violent crimes. Masood, who at 52 is considerably older than most extremists who carry out bloodshed in the West, had an arrest record dating to 1983.
Voice Of America
a day
New data shows that parts of New Zealand's South Island moved several meters closer to the North Island during last November's 7.8 magnitude earthquake. The data, including satellite radar imagery, shows that parts of New Zealand’s South Island have shifted more than 5 meters closer to the North Island, and that some areas were raised by up to 8 meters. Other information has come from observations on the ground and the analysis of coastal regions by GNS science, a New Zealand government research agency. The tremor, near the tourist town of Kaikoura, ruptured a swath of land almost 200 kilometers long. Research coming out GNS has published the first of 10 papers on the powerful quake in mid-November 2016 in the international journal Science. Two people were killed when the magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck and Kaikoura was cut off by landslides. Ian Hamling is the lead author of the research paper.
Western Morning News
a day
Exeter had twice as many rough sleepers last autumn as there were in Plymouth a city twice its size. On a typical night last November, Exeter had 41 rough sleepers against Plymouth's 20 the worst rate compared to population across the peninsula. In all of Devon and Cornwall there were 214 rough sleepers the highest number since 2010. And the Isles of Scilly had its first regular rough sleeper last autumn, since at least 2010, new figures from the Department for...
The Economic Times
a day
MUMBAI: The Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) on Friday barred Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL), the country's second most valued firm, and 12 other entities from dealing in equity derivatives futures and options segment for a period of one year, directly or indirectly, for allegedly indulging in fraudulent trades in Reliance Petroleum in 2007. The capital markets regulator has also directed RIL to disgorge Rs 447.27 crore along with 12% interest from November 29, 2007 onwards till the date of payment, within 45 days from the date of the order.Sebi has allowed RIL and the other entities to square off or close out their existing open positions. Reacting to the decision, Reliance said it plans to challenge the order in the Securities Appellate Tribunal. "Sebi appears to have misconstrued the true nature of the transactions and imposed unjustifiable sanctions,'' a Reliance spokesperson said in an emailed statement.
The Economic Times
a day
MUMBAI: The Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) on Friday barred Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL), the country's second most valued firm, and 12 other entities from dealing in equity derivatives futures and options segment for a period of one year, directly or indirectly, for allegedly indulging in fraudulent trades in Reliance Petroleum in 2007. The capital markets regulator has also directed RIL to disgorge Rs 447.27 crore along with 12% interest from November 29, 2007 onwards till the date of payment, within 45 days from the date of the order.Sebi has allowed RIL and the other entities to square off or close out their existing open positions. Reacting to the decision, Reliance said it plans to challenge the order in the Securities Appellate Tribunal. "Sebi appears to have misconstrued the true nature of the transactions and imposed unjustifiable sanctions,'' a Reliance spokesperson said in an emailed statement.
Voice Of America
a day
The proposed changes are projected to release 9,500 inmates from California prisons over four years — a necessity because the state's 34 prisons are nearing a maximum population, set by federal courts, of about 116,000 inmates. California already has had to shift some prisoners from state institutions to county jails, or to prisons in other states, to avoid exceeding the courts' limit. The move is also part of a years long effort by advocates trying to improve the prison system by reducing the number of inmates. That move gained impetus in November when California voters approved a ballot initiative (Proposition 57) that allows certain felons to seek parole more quickly. Police and prosecutors opposed the move for easier parole, arguing it would put dangerous offenders back on the streets too soon. The new rules also change the process that prosecutors and victims use to object to early parole, doing away with lengthy formal parole hearings in favor of written statements.
The Washington Times - Basketball
a day
GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) - Eight days before the competition begins, a shiny new basketball court has been laid in place for the Final Four. Made of sturdy maple harvested in November in northern Michigan, the court was shipped to Idaho Falls, Idaho, for painting and staining. From there it was ...
The Washington Times - NCAA
a day
GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) - Eight days before the competition begins, a shiny new basketball court has been laid in place for the Final Four. Made of sturdy maple harvested in November in northern Michigan, the court was shipped to Idaho Falls, Idaho, for painting and staining. From there it was ...
Voice Of America
a day
IS suicide bombers are dressing as civilians to attack Iraqi forces with light arms and suicide belts. "IS would use explosives-laden belts and would even force civilians to carry them in those neighborhoods," al-Mazhar said. According to a report by The Hague's International Centre for Counter-Terrorism (ICCT), a majority of IS suicide attacks in the past in Iraq and Syria have been carried out in car bomb operations. Studying IS suicide operations between December 2015 and November 2016, ICCT found that "seventy percent of IS's suicide fighters died in [car bomb] operations." IS also used special operatives known as "inghimas fighters" who attacked with light arms and suicide belts. "It is apparent from the scale of IS's suicide industry that there exists a dedicated infrastructure for manufacturing would-be martyrs and it is only increasing in efficiency," the report said.