Daily Mail - USA
3 hours
The Huffington Post
13 hours
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil (Reuters) - The shrunken carcasses of cows lie in scorched fields outside the city of Campina Grande in northeast Brazil, and hungry goats search for food on the cracked-earth floor of the Boqueirao reservoir that serves the desperate town. After five years of drought, farmer Edivaldo Brito says he cannot remember when the Boqueirão reservoir was last full. But he has never seen it this empty. Weve lost everything: bananas, beans, potatoes, Brito said. We have to walk 3 kilometers just to wash clothes. Brazils arid northeast is weathering its worst drought on record and Campina Grande, which has 400,000 residents that depend on the reservoir, is running out of water. After two years of rationing, residents complain that water from the reservoir is dirty, smelly and undrinkable. Those who can afford to do so buy bottled water to cook, wash their teeth with, and even to give their pets.
MSNBC
15 hours
Voice Of America
17 hours
U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan is visiting the Rio Grande valley for a firsthand look at the U.S.-Mexico border as the Trump administration steps up immigration enforcement and prepares to ask Congress to pay for a border wall. It's the first time the Wisconsin Republican has visited the border, and protests have been announced to meet his arrival in McAllen, Texas, on Wednesday. Ryan is leading a small group of lawmakers on the trip. In McAllen, Ryan will come face to face with some of the challenges that arise in building a wall along the entire 2,000-mile border. The border includes much remote and inhospitable terrain as well as the Rio Grande.
The Huffington Post
21 hours
Many DACA recipients also known as dreamers after the DREAM Act, a failed federal legislative proposal to legalize their status grew up studying hard in school, wanting to believe that academic success would somehow earn them legal status one day. Meanwhile, their parents lived and worked in the shadows. Now they worry they might get caught in Trumps immigration dragnet and deported to dangerous countries they hardly know. I got too safe and complacent after DACA , said Manrique, who arrived in the United States when she was seven years old and recalls her mother pulling her across the Rio Grande River in a floating tire. This election burst that bubble. Im just trying to prepare for the worst, she added. Dreamer Doctors Manriques school, Loyola Stritch, currently has 28 undocumented medical students, more than any other program in the country.
Daily Express - Showbiz
2 days
The Week
3 days
We are coming to Nineveh to liberate the western side of Mosul." Reporting from the area, Al Jazeera's Osama Bin Javaid confirmed that several different groups would be involved in "a complex assault" on IS positions. "[Mosul is] flanked from the eastern side by counter-terrorism forces, from the south by the Iraqi police, and from the north by the Iraqi military and the popular mobilisation forces, also known as the Shia militias," he said. Western Mosul is densely populated and the United Nations has expressed concern regarding the welfare of citizens during the operation. According to the organisation, up to 650,000 residents may be trapped in the area. Lise Grande, the UN's humanitarian coordinator in Iraq, said: "We are racing against the clock to prepare emergency sites south of Mosul to receive displaced families." Leaflets have been dropped over the west of the city by the Iraqi army to warn residents that a liberation offensive is imminent. Middle East
Voice Of America
3 days
Abadi announced the launch of the western Mosul operation Sunday, calling it a "new phase in the operation." "Our forces are beginning the liberation of the citizens from the terror of Daesh," he said, using an Arabic acronym for the militant group that seized Mosul in mid-2014. Abadi also urged security forces to respect human rights as the fight continues. U.S. military officials have warned the fight for the western part of the city will likely be much tougher. Iraqi special operations forces, regular army and federal police units are taking part in the offensive along with government-approved paramilitary forces. The United Nations warned that hundreds of thousands of civilians are at risk in Mosul. "The situation is distressing. People, right now, are in trouble,'' Lise Grande, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator for Iraq, said in a statement. "We are hearing reports of parents struggling to feed their children and to heat their homes,'' Grande said.
Global Research
3 days
The Huffington Post
4 days
BAGHDAD/ERBIL, Iraq, Feb 19 (Reuters) - U.S.-backed Iraqi forces on Sunday launched a ground offensive to dislodge Islamic State militants from their remaining stronghold in Mosul, in the western part of the city, and put an end to their ambitions for territorial rule in Iraq. Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced the start of the offensive in the northern Iraqi city, asking the armed forces to respect human rights during the battle and to take care of those displaced by the fighting. Islamic State militants are essentially under siege in western Mosul, along with an estimated 650,000 civilians, after they were forced out of the eastern part of the city in the first phase of an offensive that concluded last month, after 100 days of fighting. Up to 400,000 civilians could be displaced by the offensive as residents of western Mosul suffer food and fuel shortages and markets are closed, United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq Lise Grande told Reuters on Saturday.
The Sun Daily
4 days
Thousands of casualties Lise Grande, UN humanitarian coordinator in Iraq, said it remains to be seen if security forces are able to spare the lives of civilians in the latest assault. "The Iraqi security forces were able to protect hundreds of thousands of civilians in eastern Mosul" and "their intention is to use a similar humanitarian concept of operations in western Mosul," she said. "If it develops that the army cannot protect civilians, then other arrangements will be made. That could include helping families cross the front line ... (and) opening humanitarian corridors." No official figures are available on the number of deaths during the offensive in the east. But the government of the autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan said 14,000 wounded civilians and soldiers had been admitted to hospitals in Arbil since the start of operations on Oct 17. — AFP
TIME - Top Stories
4 days
Separately, the army's 9th Division moved into the village of Bakhira, also southwest of the city, the Iraqi Ministry of Defense said. The United Nations meanwhile warned that hundreds of thousands of civilians trapped inside their houses are at extreme risk, with dwindling fuel and food supplies and scare drinking water and electricity. The situation is distressing. People, right now, are in trouble, Lise Grande, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator for Iraq, said in a statement. We are hearing reports of parents struggling to feed their children and to heat their homes, Grande said. Citing witnesses in western Mosul, the U.N. said nearly half of all food shops were closed and bakeries had shut down due to a lack of fuel and an inability to purchase costly flour. Prices of kerosene and cooking gas have skyrocketed, and many of the most destitute families are burning wood, furniture, plastic or garbage for cooking and heating.
The Sun Daily - World News
4 days
Aid organisations had feared an exodus of unprecedented proportions before the start of the Mosul operation but half a million – a significant majority – of residents stayed home. Trapped civilians Their continued presence prevented both sides from resorting to deadlier weaponry, which may have slowed down the battle but averted a potentially much more serious humanitarian emergency in the middle of winter as well as more extensive material damage to the city. "Mosul is going better than we expected, but there are serious dangers ahead," Lise Grande, UN humanitarian coordinator in Iraq, told AFP. Residents of west Mosul have reported very difficult living conditions and warned that they were already low on food, with weeks of fighting expected to lie ahead. Save the Children urged all parties to protect the estimated 350,000 children currently trapped in west Mosul.
OK!
4 days
Jesy Nelson was seen enjoying a night out with friends and TOWIE's Chris Clark [Snapchat ] Little Mix singer Jesy Nelson left her fans guessing after her friend shared a racy video of her showing off some sultry dance moves next to TOWIE star Chris Clark. The former X Factor star, who is said to have split from her fiancé Jake Roche last year, enjoyed a night out with pals during a break from the Little Mix tour with Ariana Grande. Jesy’s friend Sam King shared footage from the ...
Herald Courier
4 days
EDIS Emergency & Disaster Alert
5 days
The shrunken carcasses of cows lie in scorched fields outside the city of Campina Grande in northeast Brazil, and hungry goats search for food on the cracked-earth floor of the Boqueirao reservoir that serves the desperate town. After five years of drought, farmer Edivaldo Brito says he cannot remember when the Boqueirao reservoir was last full. But he has never seen it this empty. We've lost everything: bananas, beans, potatoes, Brito said. We have to walk 3 kilometers just to wash clothes. Brazil's arid northeast is weathering its worst drought on record and Campina Grande, which has ...
BBC News 24
5 days
The central government there is under pressure to finalise a much anticipated and controversial rerouting of one of the country's largest rivers. Pablo Uchoa has this report. This is what five years of drought have done to this reservoir. It is of Campina Grande, two years of rationing have hit the poor harder.
ABC News - International
5 days
Daily Mail - Home
6 days
EVO News
6 days
Voice Of America
7 days
"There are domino effects all over." Many local business people expect Mexico to fight back. "A 20 percent tax could start a trade war with Mexico. I don't see how we can impose that unilaterally," said Ricardo Crisantes, vice president of marketing and sales at Wholesum Harvest, which is part of a Mexico-based company that has offices in Nogales and organic farms on both sides of the border. Company representatives said a border tax could drive the company to shift more farming to the United States, but it also could send import demand to other parts of Latin America that would bypass Nogales. Restaurant and store owners say the tax would make already tough times even worse. "It would be huge," said Karla Galindo, 35, who owns Rancho Grande restaurant in Nogales with her husband. She and other local business owners said sales have already been hurt by the war of words between officials in Mexico and the United States. "People are afraid to spend their money," Galindo said.
Deadline
7 days
Voice Of America
7 days
Security concerns forced the United Nations to pause its aid operations this week in east Mosul, which Iraqi forces recaptured from Islamic State last month, but they will resume soon, a U.N. humanitarian official said on Wednesday. “Based on reports of insecurity, the U.N. decided that we would not send missions into eastern parts of Mosul until we reassess security conditions,” said Lise Grande, the U.N. Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq. “This has now been done and we expect to re-engage as soon as possible, hopefully within the next day or so.” A suicide bombing at a restaurant in east Mosul last Friday killed 14 people and wounded 39, the second of its kind in the four-month-old Mosul battle. The attack fractured a sense of safety and relief that many residents felt after Iraqi forces pushed the jihadists out of their neighborhoods in months of heavy street fighting.
The Huffington Post
8 days
And some came seeking opportunities to escape poverty and make a better life for themselves and their families. Yet no matter why or how we came to America, any greatness realized within our borders is because we are all here. The words of President Barack Obama ring resoundingly in my heart today, "We were strangers once, too," he said. "And whether our forebears were strangers who crossed the Atlantic, or the Pacific, or the Rio Grande, we are here only because this country welcomed them in, and taught them that to be an American is about something more than what we look like, or what our last names are, or how we worship." Hebrew scripture reminds us that the Egyptians grew in their disdain for the refugees in their midst. They treated them poorly and subjected them to unfair labor laws. The Egyptians Empire unfairly targeted the Hebrew refugees with propaganda campaigns designed to turn the Egyptian people against them by portraying the Hebrews as evil and a threat.