Core77
a month
Musical instrument makers (Lutherie) use a bench that's pretty much the same as a cabinetmaker's bench, but the work is lighter overall, and the glue pot is indicative that instruments are mostly glued together rather than joined like furniture. There is a small planing stop on the bench, and of course precisely planing wood is an important part of the job. Wood engravers don't need a fancy bench, just something that will clamp the work on the surface. Here we see a holdfast and the dogholes to put it in, nothing else. The case maker's bench (for making briefcases/suitcases and the like) is pretty simple, as cases aren't very heavy. So this is a light-duty bench with a single leg vise. This bench is shown several times in the Encyclopedia, once in a workshop illustration but twice as a detail, in the joinery section and in the cabinetmaking and marquetry section.
Core77
2 months
I've been looking through the Diderot Encyclopedia (1751- 1777) doing research on workbenches. I've found lots of images of workbenches, all similar yet different; each was designed to help execute a specific trade. The only common thread I see is they all seem to use a lot of holdfasts . Anyway, before I expound on these, I thought it might be fun to have a little contest. Here are seven photos of workbenches, and beneath that I'll list twelve trades (five extras just to confuse you). See if you can match the trade to the bench, and provide the list in the comments. A B C D E F G Sorry for the distortion in the photos! The pages weren't flat, the workbenches presumably were. Trades: 1 - Box Making 2 - Cabinetmaking and Marquetry 3 - Carpentry (as distinct from joinery) 4 - Carriage Making 5 - Case Making 6 - Chest, Case, and Trunk Making 7 - Clog Making (wooden shoes) 8 - Framing (pictures) 9 - Joinery, Cabinetmaking and Marquetry 10 - Musical Instrument Making (Lutherie) 11 - Wood Engraver 12 - Sawyer (lumber trades) I'll sound off on the benches in the next entry.
Hackaday
10 months
Cutting the slots in a guitar's neck for the frets requires special tooling, and [Gord]'s contribution to his friend's recent dive into lutherie was this lovingly engineered and crafted fret mitering jig . We'd love to have a friend like [Gord]. We've covered a number of [Gord]'s builds before, and craftsmanship is the first thing that comes to mind whether the project is a man-cave clock or artisanal soaps . For this build, he stepped up the quality a notch after all, if you're going to build something you could buy for less than $200 , you might as well make it a thing to behold. There's plenty to feast the eyes on here an oak bed with custom logo, the aluminum jig body with brass accents, and the precision bearings that guide the pricey backsaw. Functionality abounds too everything is adjustable, from the depth of cut to the width of the saw blade.
Design Milk - Tech
a year
The Huffington Post
a year
By the mid-1970's, Boak made his way back to Pennsylvania working as a performing artist and dabbling in lutherie when an act of trespassing would turn into a life-changing event. An Unusual Hiring . . . And Firing Boak would routinely skulk behind the Nazareth, Pennsylvania headquarters of Martin Guitar and rummage through their dumpsters for discarded wood. One day he was caught by a foreman who wanted to know what he was doing with the wood. Boak reached into his car and handed over two instruments. The foreman told him to stay put while he summoned the head of the company, C.F. Martin III, who was so impressed with the budding luthier's creativity that he hired him on the spot. Having had years of unsteady work, Boak appeared to have settled into his calling as he quickly developed a reputation as an innovative and creative luthier. When the CEO of the company hires you and everyone loves your work, you would certainly think job security would not be a problem.
Hackaday
a year
This week, it's a layered wood pendant constructed out of many layers of veneer. Take note of the 3M 77 spray glue used for the lamination and the super glue used as a clear, hard finish. Star Wars was released and we have a few people digging through the repertoire to see what [John Williams] lifted for the new movie. Here's musical Tesla coils playing the theme for the Force. Flickr gives you a full gigabyte of storage, but only if you upload JPEGs, GIFs, and PNGs. That doesn't prevent you from using Flickr as your own cloud storage . We know two things about [Hans Fouche]: he lives in South Africa and he has a gigantic 3D printer. His latest creation is an acoustic guitar . It may not sound great, but that's the quality of the recording. It may not play great, but he can fix that with some acetone vapor. It would be very interesting to see 3D printing used in a more traditional lutherie context; this printer could easily print molds and possibly even something to bend plywood tops.
Hackaday
a year
Sheet metal. Beer cans. Pieces of chain. Not items you'll typically find on the BOM for a custom guitar. But nobody told [Maarten van Halderen] that, and so he threw them all together into a gitaar van schroot , or scrap guitar for the Dutch impaired (YouTube link). The video shows the build process, starting with plasma cutting and welding sheet steel for the body. The neck is fabricated from rectangular steel tube, with nails serving as frets. Overall it looks like a Les Paul, except for the sink strainer basket mounted in the sound hole and the crushed beer and soda cans tacked to the body for decoration. The chains are a nice touch too. And this doesn't appear to be [Maarten]'s first attempt at scrapyard lutherie toward the end of the video we see that the beer can axe joins a very steam-punk looking older brother. They're both good-looking builds, and the video after the break proves they can sound pretty good too.