The Economic Times
an hour
NEW DELHI: Legendary American motorcycle, Harley-Davidson, could end up becoming a sticking point between US President Donald Trump and Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Peter Navarro, director of White House National Trade Council, said in a letter to the editor to The Wall Street Journal that if India lowers the 100 per cent tariffs it imposes on the popular American Harley Davidson motorcycles, it could result in more foreign investments in the country. "If India agrees to lower its tariffs on Harley Davidson motorcycles, Indian consumers will buy more Harleys and save less while Harley will sell more Harleys and invest more," he said. He wrote the letter in response to the debate that his op-ed piece on March 6 in the daily had generated. In his first speech to the Congress, US president Donald Trump had raised the issue without naming India. "American companies are taxed at one of the highest rates anywhere in the world.
The Economic Times
3 hours
Yogi's elevation shows how brave Modi is. Read whyOne has to grant Narendra Modi this: even at his peak, he has promoted a new leader, two decades younger than him. It could be a great gamble.
Financial Times - India
3 hours
The Economic Times
3 hours
NEW DELHI: The Union Cabinet has approved amendments in the Customs and Excise Act relating to abolition of cesses and surcharges on various goods and services to facilitate implementation of GST. Following this, the Centre will abolish 16 cesses and surcharges on union excise and service tax as it lays down the path for rolling out Goods and Services Tax (GST) from July. The amendments in the Customs Act, 1962, allow furnishing of information relating to import or export of goods by specified persons to enable analysis and detection of cases of under or over-valuation in imports and exports. Cesses to be abolished include Krishi Kalyan and Swachh Bharat. This would lead to a loss of about Rs 65,000 crore by the exchequer. To make up for this dent, the government would have to find resources from the budget. "Amendments or repeal of various provisions of other Acts which will no longer be relevant consequent on rollout of GST will result in cleansing of the irrelevant portions from the Statute Book and reduce multiplicity of taxes," an official release said after the Cabinet meeting chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
Financial Times - India
3 hours
The Economic Times
4 hours
The Economic Times
4 hours
Is this volatility a concern or a new normal? We tend to see a lot of spikes in BARC's viewership data, but those are signs of a dynamic measurement system, which has very high fidelity. If the fidelity is high, it means we are capturing what people are watching, which at times will lead to volatility. One needs to understand that any big event gets captured quite well and results in spikes, whether it is the Chennai floods, the unfortunate demise of Dr Kalam, an India-Pakistan match, or PM Modi's address. I think it is very natural, understandable and ogical. This does cause a bit of volatility in the data, but I think the two go hand-in-hand. But what about smaller channels or niche channels that witness major swings in their ratings in the BARC regime? In case of smaller or niche channels, the issue is adequate sample size. Unless we dial up the sample andor change sampling methodology, the chances of spikes will be high.
Financial Times - Europe
4 hours
Financial Times - United States
4 hours
The Economic Times
4 hours
The Economic Times
4 hours
View: Will UP's new tiger change its saffron stripes?Will Adityanath tone down his fiery rhetoric in office? He has vowed to turn Uttar Pradesh into Modi's 'dream state', but that phrase can turn out to be double-edged.
The Economic Times
4 hours
Narendra Modi has shown great courage by elevating Yogi Adityanath. Here's why One has to grant Narendra Modi this: even at his peak, he has promoted a new leader, two decades younger than him. It could be a great gamble.
The Iran Project
4 hours
CHABAHAR PORT The reticence of Indian banks with U.S. exposure has also slowed work on the Iranian port of Chabahar and a $1.6 billion rail link backed by New Delhi that would bypass arch-rival Pakistan and counter China's growing influence in the region. One official involved in the Chabahar project said contractors, concerned about getting paid , were now reluctant to supply equipment and materials for the Arabian Sea port whose completion is planned for 2018. If Trump imposes more sanctions on Iran, we may have to wind up most of our plans, the official said. Foreign minister Sushma Swaraj told parliament recently that Iran had yet to ratify a trilateral pact to set up the transit corridor to Afghanistan that was signed on a visit last year by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The government is still in a wait-and-watch mode and closely monitoring Trump's approach towards Iran, said a senior official who joined Modi on his trip to Iran.
The Economic Times
15 hours
The Economic Times
15 hours
The Economic Times
16 hours
The Economic Times
16 hours
The Economic Times
18 hours
The Economic Times
19 hours
The Economic Times
19 hours
Mihir Sharma India has never been a perfect democracy. But for decades it’s succeeded in being a representative one. Its politics are raucous, with dozens of parties and unwieldy ruling coalitions. This has long been a source of dismay to its influential middle class, who speak longingly of the “efficiency” they imagine one-party rule has delivered to countries as big as China and as tiny as Singapore. Those Indians should beware what they wish for. Politically, if not constitutionally, India is edging ever closer to being a one-party state -- closer than it’s been since the heyday of the Indian National Congress Party, which led the country to independence. In 2014, under Narendra Modi, the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party won an absolute majority of seats in parliament on its own, something that hadnt happened in three decades. The party has since extended its dominance, sweeping to power in several more states this month including India’s most populous, Uttar Pradesh.
The Economic Times
a day
Here is how Congress can still stop Modi in 2019The first thing the Congress has to do is to stand for something it wants to do with the power that it legitimately seeks, as any political party must.
The Economic Times
a day
View: Prime Minister Narendra Modi may be getting too powerful for his own goodIndia is edging ever closer to being a one-party statecloser than it’s been since the heyday of Congress, which led the country to independence.
The Economic Times
a day
The Economic Times
a day
Congress can still stop Modi in 2019 without showing Rahul the door. Here's howThe first thing the Congress has to do is to stand for something it wants to do with the power that it legitimately seeks, as any political party must.