BBC News 24
4 minutes
Washington Free Beacon
10 minutes
French presidential candidate Marie Le Pen canceled a meeting with a Muslim leader on Tuesday after she was urged to wear a headscarf. Le Pen was scheduled to meet with Lebanon’s Grand Mufti, Sheikh Abdel-Latif Derian, during her two day tour of the country. Le Pen is the president of the far-right National Front party and has frequently criticized religious symbols in public places— especially headscarfs. When Le Pen arrived for the meeting, she was surprised when an aide to the grand mufti attempted to hand her a white headscarf. Le Pen told reporters that when she met with the grand mufti of Al-Azhar during a 2015 trip to Egypt, she wasn't required to cover her head. "I met the grand mufti of Al-Azhar," Le Pen said. "The highest Sunni authority didn't have this requirement, but it doesn't matter." Before leaving the meeting, Le Pen passed on her respects but stated that she would not wear the headscarf.
Sky News
19 minutes
How the UK Muslim got compensation after being freed from one-time obey snaked off to join the jihad is. The context of this course is he is picked up soon after September 11 in the Afghanistan conflict.
RT America
36 minutes
PressTV News
38 minutes
Sky News
an hour
Some American Muslims are already terrified by the current climate. We still get mosque arsons, we get people leaving bacon on door handles at mosques, we get Muslim women harassed in the street and shouted at and called terrorists and all this kind of thing.
Sky News
an hour
Donald Trump is a different president because the alt-right. The so-called 'Muslim ban', which wasn't... I mean, I would support a Muslim ban, it was not a real Muslim ban. It was, you could say, weak, on one level. It was temporary, it was just a handful of countries.
Politico
an hour
The White House is sending mixed signals as to whether or not it will rescind President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban even as officials seek to craft a new order that will be less vulnerable to legal challenge. The Justice Department told the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals last week that Trump will rescind...and replace the original order, which remains largely on hold after an appeals court panel upheld a lower court’s broad injunction. But White House press secretary Sean Spicer said at the conclusion of his daily briefing Tuesday that Trump will not rescind the original order. Instead, the first order is being updated, Spicer insisted. The contradictory statements sowed further confusion about the fate of Trump's original order, which bars immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries and halts the entry of refugees. The new order is going to be very much tailored to what I consider to be a very bad decision, Trump said last week.
BBC News 24
an hour
Speaking to Panorama after his release from Guantanamo Bay, his family spoke of the transformation they saw in him. He may have changed a little bit when he converted to be a Muslim, he may have changed in that he did not do all the bad things, like going to clubs, going out and meeting girls, smoking, drinking... He turned into a placid person.
Ruptly TV
an hour
Sky News
2 hours
I would also want an immigration system that explicitly preferenced Europeans as new immigrants. Some American Muslims are already terrified by the current climate. We still get mosque arsons, we get people leaving bacon on door handles at mosques, we get Muslim women harassed in the street and shouted at and called terrorists and all this kind of thing.
Sky News
2 hours
And he believes he has already indirectly influenced the president. Donald Trump is a different president because the alt-right. The so-called 'Muslim ban', which wasn't... I mean, I would support a Muslim ban, it was not a real Muslim ban. It was, you could say, weak, on one level.
Sky News
2 hours
Daily Mail - Home
2 hours
Woolwich Crown Court heard how Patrick Kabele, 32, from Willesden in north London, kept a diary on his phone in which he detailed how he had a 'death wish' and wanted to die young.
Global News
2 hours
Voice Of America
3 hours
Elabe pollsters reckon he has made a series of missteps that explain how they now see Fillon ahead. Macron "has had 10 difficult days," they said. Anger on the right Macron angered opponents on the right during a visit to Algeria last week by calling France's colonial past a crime against humanity. He has upset gay-marriage supporters by saying their opponents had been humiliated by the government when it pushed through the gay marriage bill in 2013. On Tuesday, Macron took his centrist and pro-European campaign to London, home to a large expatriate French community who get to vote in the elections. The anti-immigration, anti-European Union Le Pen, meanwhile, caused controversy on a trip to Lebanon, where her plans to meet a senior Muslim figure were canceled after her refusal to wear a headscarf. Le Pen's surge has worried investors concerned that her policies will further destabilize fragile European unity, blow apart the eurozone and hurt the value of French debt.
Channel4 News
3 hours
The White House says it's working on a new executive order to replace the immigration travel ban, blocked by the courts. While that ban against refugees, as well as citizens from seven Muslim -majority countries, drew headlines worldwide, President Trump's immigration policies at home have received less attention.
Channel4 News
3 hours
T he impact of American immigration policy is being felt on this side of the pond too. A Welsh Muslim school teacher said today he was made to feel like a criminal after being taken off a New York-bound flight and refused permission to travel.
CNN
3 hours
The Huffington Post
3 hours
WASHINGTONSchool administrators in a 93 percent white Maryland county recently asked high school teachers to take down pro-diversity posters from classrooms because they perceived them as political and anti-Trump, a school spokesperson told The Huffington Post. Teachers at Westminster High School had put up the posters, which depicted Latina, Muslim and black women and were designed by Shepard Fairey, the artist who created the Hope posters featuring President Barack Obama in 2008. The women are rendered in patriotic colors, with messages like We the people are greater than fear. The teachers put up the posters as a show of diversity, said Carey Gaddis, a spokeswoman for Carroll County Public Schools. At least one staff member complained about the posters, and the teachers were asked to take them down because they were being perceived as anti-Trump by the administration, Gaddis said.
Channel 4
4 hours
Donald Trump's hardline immigration policy is being felt on this side of the pond, too. Today, a Welsh Muslim school teacher said he was made to feel like a criminal after being taken off a New York-bound flight Juhel Miah, a maths teacher from Swansea, was accompanying pupils on a trip to the US.
Channel 4
4 hours
The White House says it's working on a new executive order to replace the immigration travel ban blocked by the courts. While that ban against refugees, as well as citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries, drew headlines worldwide, President Trump's immigration policies at home have received less attention. But new policies released today would increase the number of undocumented immigrants that could be deported.
Voice Of America
4 hours
“There is a great yearning by the people to hang 'the bastards;' I really think people feel that way,” says political consultant Atilla Yesilada of Global Source partners; but Yesilada says Turkey will pay a high price. “If it is ever introduced, the EU has no choice but to cut the umbilical link to Turkey.” EU warning The European Union has warned Ankara its bid to join would be automatically frozen, but, with that bid making little progress because of opposition from some members, there is growing resentment among many Turks toward the European Union. Erdogan said he is not going to listen to Europeans, referring to them as "Hans and George." At the Kahramanmaras rally, Erdogan told his supporters, “I listen to the Ayses and Ahmets of our country," referring to traditional Turkish Muslim names, while adding, "I listen to the words of God." Analysts say such rhetoric plays well with large sections of the electorate, underscoring his message of the need for a strong president with strong powers.
TIME - Top Stories
4 hours
We are fearful that our family and neighbors might be barred from entering the U.S. by a Muslim ban or might lose their access to health care if the Affordable Care Act is recklessly repealed. We are worried that the political system now serves corporate interests and the Presidents far-flung (but undisclosed) business interests, not the interests of the people or their nation. We are alarmed that people we know and love wont be treated equally or fairly under the new Administration. The Tea Party consisted of people angry about their own perceived situation; the resistance is people alarmed and fearful about what might happen to others. The best distinction between the two movements, though, is the one that is most important to our President: crowd size. The largest Tea Party rallies reported were between 150,000 and 250,000 people, depending on the source.