TIME - Top Stories
2 days
Johnson treated his beagle better than Humphrey, says Paul Light, an expert on the presidency at NYU Wagner , who notes that Presidents have sometimes seen VPs as competition. Theyre looking at the person who could be sleeping in their bed, as he puts it, which doesn't exactly form a basis for cordial and enduring relationships. Some historians say Johnson may have treated Humphrey like that because he himself had felt useless during his own term as a Vice President. (The need to assert the President's vitality can backfire in other ways too: Woodrow Wilson's Vice President lost access to the President after Wilson suffered a stroke in 1919a move that some historians argue doomed the League of Nations in the lead-up to World War II.) But when Jimmy Carter was elected in 1976, he couldn't afford to freeze out his Vice-President, Walter Mondale.
Mondoweiss
3 days
The story is simple. In 1913, President-elect Woodrow Wilson rejected Brandeis, then 56, for his Cabinet because Brandeis was so assimilated many Jews didnt even know he was Jewish, and Wilson wanted a “representative Jew” in order to woo the masses of eastern European immigrants then entering east coast cities. Within days of the disappointment, Brandeis publicly declared his Zionism, and began appearing at Zionist events, giving Zionist speeches, and taking on offices of Zionist leadership. Before long, his “picture was reverently hung in many Roumanian Jewish homes,” one Zionist wrote. In 1916 Wilson appointed Brandeis to the Supreme Court as the first Jewish justice, and he was confirmed by the Senate after a lengthy battle marked by anti-Semitism. (There have been seven Jewish justices since.) The suspicion about Brandeis's calculations is not idle, but based on compelling archival evidence.
Voice Of America
3 days
Thousands of women take to the streets of Washington, demanding a greater voice for women in American political life as a new president takes power. This will happen on Saturday, one day after the inauguration of Donald Trump. This DID happen more than 100 years ago, one day before the inauguration of Woodrow Wilson. So notable was the women's suffrage parade down Pennsylvania Avenue on March 3, 1913, that Wilson slipped into town almost unnoticed on the eve of his swearing-in, forced to travel back alleys to reach his hotel. "Scarcely a score of persons noticed his automobile as it whizzed through the silent streets, and only a few applauded him as he reached his hotel," The New York Times reported at the time. Meanwhile, more than 5,000 women marched from the Capitol to the steps of the Treasury Department in a parade that featured nine bands, four mounted brigades and two dozen floats.
Politico
3 days
Library of Congress
8 days
TIME - Top Stories
8 days
With the news this week that U.S. President-elect Donald Trump has named his son-in-law Jared Kushner a senior adviser, the fellow real-estate developer is now in position to become what some have called the most powerful son-in-law of a president in U.S. history. But, while Kushner's power will certainly be unusual, he will not be the first presidential son-in-law to wield great influence. Case in point : William Gibbs McAdoo was a high-profile businessman before he went to work in Woodrow Wilson's administration, where he served as Secretary of the Treasury. He also married the President's daughter. The differences between Kushner and McAdoo are many. For one thing, McAdoo's time as a White House son-in-law predates the federal anti-nepotism statute known as the Bobby Kennedy law, which prohibits federal officials from appointing relatives to certain jobs.
Al Jazeera
9 days
Al Jazeera
10 days
TIME - Top Stories
15 days
Do you have a question about history? Send us your question at history@time . com and you might find your answer in a future edition of Now You Know. Though such a move might seem unusual today, American parents of the past did sometimes give their children names like John Quincy Adams Miller and Woodrow Wilson Smith. What's the history behind that White-House-worthy naming tradition, and what happened to it? When this question first came in from a reader, the first person to spring to mind was perhaps the most famous example of a presidential namesake: George Washington Carver. Maybe his story could help illuminate the history of these types of names. But, as it happens, Carver's parents weren't the ones to make the presidential connection. Carver chose his own middle name, having selected a middle initial to avoid confusion with another George Carver.
The Huffington Post
16 days
The Event Chronicle
19 days
This was a very underhanded deal, as the Constitution explicitly vests Congress with the authority to issue the public currency, does not authorize its delegation, and thus should have required a new Amendment to transfer that authority to a private bank. But pass it Congress did, and President Woodrow Wilson signed it as he promised the bankers he would in exchange for generous campaign contributions. News report of Wilson’s signing the Federal Reserve Act. Under the Constitution, only a new Amendment could transfer the government’s authority to create the currency to a private party. President Woodrow Wilson President Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson later regretted that decision. “I am a most unhappy man. I have unwittingly ruined my country. A great industrial nation is now controlled by its system of credit. We are no longer a government by free opinion, no longer a government by conviction and the vote of the majority, but a government by the opinion and duress of a small group of dominant men.
Politico
20 days
Collective Evolution
21 days
But we must remember, we are not victims of this, they simply play a role for us to learn from in a much bigger play, something we often don't remember to see. You can explore this more in our latest documentary here. As the 28th President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson, said perfectly: Since I entered politics, I have chiefly had men’s views confided to me privately. Some of the biggest men in the United States, in the field of commerce and manufacture, are afraid of somebody, are afraid of something. They know that there is a power somewhere so organized, so subtle, so watchful, so interlocked, so complete, so pervasive, that they had better not speak above their breath when they speak in condemnation of it. ( href="https://books.google.ca/books?id=wObVs3ft9C8C&pg=PT17&lpg=PT17&dq=The+New+Freedom+Since+I+entered+politics,+I+have+chiefly+had+men%27s+views+confided+to+me+privately.
Al Jazeera
22 days
Collective Evolution
23 days
But we must remember, we are not victims of this, they simply play a role for us to learn from in a much bigger play, something we often don't remember to see. You can explore this more in our latest documentary here. As the 28th President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson, said perfectly: Since I entered politics, I have chiefly had men’s views confided to me privately. Some of the biggest men in the United States, in the field of commerce and manufacture, are afraid of somebody, are afraid of something. They know that there is a power somewhere so organized, so subtle, so watchful, so interlocked, so complete, so pervasive, that they had better not speak above their breath when they speak in condemnation of it. ( source ) David Rockefeller also addresses this topic in his Memoirs: Some even believe we are part of a secret cabal working against the best interests of the United States, characterizing my family as internationalists' and of conspiring with others around the world to build a more integrated global political economic structure One World, if you will.
TIME - Top Stories
a month
Grant and Bill Clinton. As his time as the leader of the free world comes to a close, Obama is preparing for reentry. The modern post-presidency has been de-fined by extremes. Bill Clinton launched a high-profile foundation that has had significant impact and has grown exponentially, while also earning many millions of dollars on the speaking circuit. George W. Bush had far fewer appearances and took up water- color painting. Obama appears ready to chart a course somewhere in between, toggling be- tween the limelight and a return to the social- justice issues that sparked his interest in pub-lic service back in the 1980s. In a notable departure from precedent, Obama and his family will stay in Washington after his term is up so that his daughter Sasha can graduate from her high school, which she is scheduled to do in 2019. The Obamas will live in the Kalorama neighborhood and will become the first First Family to remain in the capital since Woodrow Wilson was president.
TIME - Top Stories
a month
In 1902, journalists got their own office in the West Wing. He used favorite correspondents for trial balloon' stories, TIME reported in an April 23, 1945, story about the White House press, with the expectation that he would deny the truth of the story if the reaction was a bad one. Even when he did, journalists readily forgave him because he made such astounding copy, the April 1938 issue of Fortune magazine reported. Under Woodrow Wilson, press conferences went from invitation-only gatherings to events open to all reporters, Kumar says. The first press conference happened a little more than a week after his inauguration, when his private secretary Joseph Tumulty told reporters that the President would look them in the face and chat with them for a few minutes at 12:45 p.m. on March 15, 1913.
Politico
a month
Voice Of America
a month
Voice Of America
a month
President-elect Trump has been remarkably hard to figure. ... He constantly keeps us guessing,” wrote Michael Kugelman of Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in the Pakistani newspaper DAWN. “But then again, we could be wrong to believe that Trump will take a sanguine position on U.S.-Pakistan relations. After all, as analysts, we do tend to be wrong sometimes - about Trump and so many other things too," said Kugelman. Anjana Pasricha in New Delhi contributed to this story
TIME - Top Stories
2 months
The Green Room, she noted, used to be the dining room, and here Jefferson gave his famous dinners and introduced such exotic foods as macaroni, waffles and ice cream to the United States. Woodrow Wilson so detested the stuffed animal heads with which Theodore Roosevelt had adorned the state dining room that he always seated himself in such a manner that he would not see them while dining. Showing off the Lincoln bed, Jackie remarked dryly: Every President seemed to love it. Said she in the Red Room: One thing that's interestingPresident Hayes was sworn in here as President secretly at night, cause his was the closest election there ever was and they didn't want the United States to be without a President for even one day, so while everyone was having dinner they swore him in here. Moving from the Red Room to the Blue Room, Collingwood said as a sort of conversation opener: Oh, this has a very different feeling from the Red Room.
Adweek
2 months
In fact, hes the Centennial Ambassador for the National Park Services #FindYourPark campaign, which celebrates the 100-year anniversary of President Woodrow Wilson creating the service. As ambassador, Nye focuses on getting the next generation of park goers excited about the parks and how to preserve them. While the parks are on track to host 320 million visitors this year, adults between ages 18 and 35 are less interested in visiting than the rest of the population, said to Will Shafroth, president of the National Park Foundation. Shafroth said technology has shifted peoples focus away from family road trips and parks. But now, the parks want to use technology to bring them back. He said the foundation is increasingly targeting its marketing at millennials. One of the reasons we picked [Nye] is hes both an entertainer, but an entertainer with a purpose, he said.
The Huffington Post
2 months
" But after a century, we lost our way. We were misled by the intellectual delusions and messianic ambitions of Woodrow Wilson and the rebarbative apotheosis of war and killing by Theodore Roosevelt. The former coveted war to transform the world into Camelot. The latter barked that,"[i]f there is not the war, you don't get the great general; if there is not a great occasion, you don't get a great statesman; if Lincoln had lived in a time of peace, no one would have known his name." As President and commander in chief, Roosevelt warred against Filipinos fighting for self-determination in the aftermath of the Spanish-American war by employing waterboarding and perpetrating mass atrocities. The United States Senate Investigating Committee on the Philippines meticulously documented the grisly war tactics that flourished under President Roosevelt. We ignored the warning of Secretary of State John Quincy Adams on July 4, 1821, that we could become dictatress of the world, but if we did, our policy would degenerate from liberty to coercion and domination, and we would plunge from light to darkness.
The Huffington Post
2 months
Trump's circus antics for decades. We Americans do not need to say Mr. Trump has Hitler-like qualities and in fact need to stop that. There are enough morally ruined leaders and figures in U.S. history who pushed various forms of hate and oppression for us to compare Mr. Trump to. We've got Frances Scott Key and we've got D.W. Griffith. We've got Rutherford B. Hayes and we've got Woodrow Wilson. We've got Bull Connor and we've got George Wallace. Yes, this new commander-in-chief is the historical President Andrew Jackson and the fictional Archie Bunker rebooted for the new millennium: crass, vulgar, enthusiastically ignorant, an egomaniac, someone who, like Jackson, belittles and despises those others: for Jackson it was Native Americans and his blood lust for their land, and the Black slaves he owned and paraded, brazenly, like prized animals in a zoo; for Trump it is Muslims and Latinos and Blacks and women and immigrants; Donald Trump is someone who, like Bunker, hails from the New York City borough of Queens, who runs off at the mouth without any thought of what he is saying (or maybe he does), and who, like Bunker, is an equal opportunity offender.