Phys.Org
3 minutes
Washington Free Beacon
21 minutes
Paul Blumenthal said. Dr. Ann Schutt-Aine, director of abortion services at Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, described the struggle to keep babies from slipping out of the womb in order to avoid performing partial birth abortion, a practice made illegal in 2003. "I might ask for a second set of forceps to hold the body at the cervix, and pull off a leg or two so it's not PBA," she said. Planned Parenthood has denied any wrongdoing in its organ harvesting practices and has criticized the videos as "deceptively edited." The organization said that it would stop accepting cash payments—which it claimed were only reimbursements to recoup storage and transportation costs—from researchers for fetal organs after CMP began releasing videos in the summer of 2015. NAF had successfully obtained a court injunction barring the release of video footage from its convention.
ScienceDaily
39 minutes
Researchers have identified a new way to potentially slow the fast-growing cells that characterize all types of cancer. By removing a specific protein from cells, they were able to slow the cell cycle, which is out of control in cancer. The findings were made in kidney and cervical cancer cells and are a long way from being applied in people, but could be the basis of a treatment option in the future.
USA Today - Top Stories
43 minutes
Washington Free Beacon
an hour
Paul Blumenthal said. Dr. Ann Schutt-Aine, director of abortion services at Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, described the struggle to keep babies from slipping out of the womb in order to avoid performing partial birth abortion, a practice made illegal in 2003. "I might ask for a second set of forceps to hold the body at the cervix, and pull off a leg or two so it's not PBA," she said. Planned Parenthood has denied any wrongdoing in its organ harvesting practices and has criticized the videos as "deceptively edited." The organization said that it would stop accepting cash payments—which it claimed were only reimbursements to recoup storage and transportation costs—from researchers for fetal organs after CMP began releasing videos in the summer of 2015. NAF had successfully obtained a court injunction barring the release of video footage from its convention.
Futurism
an hour
Space Shield Human beings have known for quite some time that our behavior has a significant influence on our planet. In fact, during the 20th century, humanity’s impact on the natural environment and climate has become so profound that some geologists began to refer to the modern era as the “Anthropocene”. In this age, human agency is the most deterministic force on the planet. But according to a comprehensive new study by an Anglo-American team of researchers, human beings might be shaping the near-space environment as well. According to the study, radio communications, EM radiation from nuclear testing and other human actions have led to the creation of a barrier around Earth that is shielding it against high-energy space radiation. The study, which was published in the journal Space Science Reviews under the titleAnthropogenic Space Weather “, was conducted by a team of scientists from the US and Imperial College, London.
KyivPost
an hour
Voice Of America
an hour
SABC Digital News
an hour
Popular Science
2 hours
Android Police
2 hours
Inc.
2 hours
CNN
2 hours
Beneath its heavy cloud cover, Jupiter has been able to keep its secrets from astronomers. Now, first results from NASA's Juno mission are challenging researchers' beliefs about the gas giant.
CNET News
2 hours
Researchers are analysing the information gathered about Jupiter by NASA's Juno probe, and the first papers are in.
Popular Science
2 hours
Health With more research, CRISPR could give us a new cancer treatment. A group of researchers recently used the CRISPR gene editing technique to try to eliminate one of the key proteins that allow cancer cells to proliferate out of control.
Scientific American - Energy & Sustainability
2 hours
Researchers are chalking out a plan that could bridge the gap between where the technology stands and where it needs to go -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Daily Mail - Science
2 hours
Researchers from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas, have analysed data collected by the Juno probe, which has now made its first close pass to Jupiter.
Phys.Org
2 hours
When a ballerina pirouettes, twirling a full revolution, she looks just as she did when she started. But for electrons and other subatomic particles, which follow the rules of quantum theory, that's not necessarily so. When an electron moves around a closed path, ending up where it began, its physical state may or may not be the same as when it left.
Phys.Org
2 hours
Phys.Org
2 hours
ScienceDaily
3 hours
Futurity
3 hours
How children respond after mass traumatic events relates to their perceptions of competence—or how they view their ability to control a situation, new research suggests. Researchers evaluated perceptions of competence and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in children and teens exposed to hurricanes Katrina and Gustav and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. They found that children with higher levels of competence were overall more resilient and had fewer PTSD symptoms. However, researchers found that competence and well-being declined for older youth, specifically between the ages of 8 to 12, following the oil spill. The findings do not explain why this is the case, says Carl Weems, professor and chair of human development and family studies at Iowa State University. Weems and colleagues suspect older youth had a greater awareness, compared to younger children, of the oil spill's impact on their family and community, which affected their well-being.
ScienceDaily
3 hours
TIME - Top Stories
3 hours
As the U.S. population continues to age, experts say rates of Alzheimers disease , a neurodegenerative condition that involves memory loss, will rise as well. Already, researchers say that deaths from Alzheimers are increasing. In the latest report on the subject, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, scientists found that deaths from Alzheimers increased 55% from 1999 to 2014. The data was collected from the National Vital Statistics System, which analyzes death certificate information in the U.S. While people with Alzheimers may die of other causes, such as respiratory failure or heart disease, these data capture when Alzheimers is an underlying cause for those conditions. MORE: Alzheimers from a New Angle The report, which tracked deaths at the county level, found that the regions with the highest deaths from Alzheimers were in the southeast, midwest and along the west coast.