Politico
3 months
As if to hammer home the point, Scott, the 58-year-old pastor from Cleveland, recounted his experiences wandering freely around Trump’s office and campaign headquarters on November 7 and 8, chatting with Melania Trump about his grandchildren and grilling Brad Parscale about early voting numbers as the campaign’s digital director sat on his desk, breezily tossing around a Nerf football. “Donald Trump was able, in the words of Rudyard Kipling, to walk with kings and to keep the common touch. He kept the grassroots around him. He took us and made us national figures,” Scott said. “Rather than the elites and the snobs and the upper crust.” Indeed, what the week’s festivities lacked in size — the Financial Times estimated a paltry inauguration showing of 250,000 — they made up for in the sheer improbability of the newly minted bold-faced names that did show up.
The Guardian - Books
4 months
The Huffington Post
4 months
A real estate hustler/reality TV star notorious for slapping his name on everything making a very serious stab at the White House ... Man, that made Marvel movies seem like Shakespeare! But if it's a science fictional world, why not the best? Besides, there was something oddly familiar about it. I never saw the movie (which has not yet been made), but I may have read the book. Leonard Nimoy reads part I of Robert A. Heinlein's ' Future History ' story about Rhysling, the blind bard of the spaceways, ' The Green Hills of Earth .' Think of a cross between Rudyard Kipling and Bob Dylan. Seventy-five years ago, way back in late but still pre-Pearl Harbor 1941, two young science fiction writers on opposite coasts -- beached former naval officer Heinlein and bookish Columbia PhD-to-be Asimov, worked out what would become famous fictional formulations of humanity's future on this planet and beyond.
Den of Geek
6 months
Open Culture
7 months
This advice sounds rather utilitarian, doesnt it? What about passion, inspiration, the muse? Eh, you dont have time for those things. If you want to be successful like Robert Heinlein, you’ve got to write stories, lots of ‘em, stories people want to publish and pay for, stories people want to read. Heinlein spends the bulk of his essay advising us on how to write such stories, with a proviso, in an epigram from Rudyard Kipling, that “there are nine-and-sixty ways / Of constructing tribal lays / And every single one of them is right.” After, however, describing in detail how he writes a “human interest” science fiction story, Heinlein then gets down to business. He assumes that we can type, know the right formats or can learn them, and can spell, punctuate, and use grammar as our “wood-carpenter’s sharp tools.” These prerequisites met, all we really need to write speculative fiction are the five rules below: 1.
ITV
7 months
The thing that I always remember about David Cameron was the lambs about Rudyard Kipling, and he said if you can meet triumph and disaster and treat those two imposters the same. He was able to handle baddies and goodies in his stride and not get overexcited. I think sometimes people interpreted that as being relaxed. In fact, it was a very good temperament for being Prime Minister.
The Guardian - Sport
8 months
Olympic champion says mediahavent taken it easy on me’ • Briton is concentrating on emulating the feat of Lasse Virén If Rudyard Kipling’s adage about treating triumph and disaster the same is a standard trope for Olympians, then for the three-time champion Mo Farah it now might be rewritten to include elation and suspicion. The morning after the night on which he became Olympic 10,000m champion for the second time, Farah said defending his 5,000m title would be a lot harder than it was in London four years ago. Continue reading...
The Huffington Post
9 months
Rudyard Kipling once claimed, "Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind." Indeed, give too little and you'll make the customer feel misunderstood; administer too much and the customer will feel like you're pandering. Getting to the sweet spot is an art, one that will take a few failures, but nevertheless worthy of your time and effort. In many ways support is the foundation of any growing company. A weak foundation can crumble a home, but a strong one sustains it. In fact, Jason Lemkin, former founder of EchoSign and venture capitalist, would argue that it is service that separates young companies from the pack. Comcast may rather be feared than loved, but Lemkin contests that if you want to go the distance, you have make the effort to wow customers: However, if word-of-mouth matters. If second-order revenue and upgrades and upsells matter .
The Week
10 months
He developed septicaemia from an infected mosquito bite and died in April 1915. His death was early enough in the war that his poems were far more idealistic and optimistic than those of poets involved in later campaigns. Excerpt from The Soldier (1914) If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field That is forever England. Rudyard Kipling Unlike the other poets on this list, Kipling did not take part in the First World War. He was 48 when the conflict broke out in 1914 so rather than signing up to fight, he wrote pro-war propaganda on behalf of the government. Kipling's son, John, was refused entry to the military due to poor eyesight, but his father pulled strings to get him in. In 1915, 18-year-old John was killed at the Battle of Loos. Excerpt from My Boy Jack (1915) "Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?" None this tide, Nor any tide. World News World War I Rudyard Kipling Wilfred Owen Rupert Brooke
The Herald - Golf
10 months
If the capacity to meet dispassionately with disaster is all that Rudyard Kipling cracked it up to be then Russell Knox seems to be better placed than most to deal with what is arguably golf’s toughest challenge in the coming week.
The Herald - Sport
10 months
If the capacity to meet dispassionately with disaster is all that Rudyard Kipling cracked it up to be then Russell Knox seems to be better placed than most to deal with what is arguably golf’s toughest challenge in the coming week.
BBC News 24
a year
It's a fair point, if you're a tiger. It is a fair point. I think what you have to remember, Gavin, is it's a story. Really? I think it's really well done, because I think what it does is take a certain amount from Rudyard Kipling, it takes an equal amount from the Disney cartoon and it breathes new life into.
BBC News 24
a year
Have you seen it yet? I haven't seen it yet. But you know I am a big Shere Khan fan. I was thought the tiger got a really rough deal. LAUGHTER. The tiger says, you go out there, and kids grow up and then they shoot you. It's a fair point, if you're a tiger. It is a fair point. I think what you have to remember, Gavin, is it's a story. Really? I think it's really well done, because I think what it does is take a certain amount from Rudyard Kipling, it takes an equal amount from the Disney cartoon and it breathes new life into.
BBC News 24
a year
It's a fair point, if you're a tiger. It is a fair point. I think what you have to remember, Gavin, is it's a story. Really? I think it's really well done, because I think what it does is take a certain amount from Rudyard Kipling, it takes an equal amount from the Disney cartoon and it breathes new life into. And your DVD, The Ninth Configuration? This is a cult movie from 1980, directed by and written by William Peter Blatty, who wrote The Exorcist.
BBC News 24
a year
The tiger says, you go out there, and kids grow up and then they shoot you. It's a fair point, if you're a tiger. It is a fair point. I think what you have to remember, Gavin, is it's a story. Really? I think it's really well done, because I think what it does is take a certain amount from Rudyard Kipling, it takes an equal amount from the Disney cartoon and it breathes new life into. And your DVD, The Ninth Configuration? This is a cult movie from 1980, directed by and written by William Peter Blatty, who wrote The Exorcist.
The Guardian - Books
a year
Write us a short story reimagining your favourite Jungle Book character to go in the draw to win tickets and merchandise for the new Disney film adaptation Since The Jungle Book was first published in 1894, Rudyard Kipling’s collection of adventures with Mowgli the boy and his animal companions has captured the imagination of children everywhere. It has been reincarnated in plays, a musical, even an opera - and most recently in the new Disney film. But what further adventures might the characters have if they were allowed to escape the original stories. What if Baloo met another bear, or Bagheera had a birthday? We are looking for young storytellers, between the ages of 6 and 12, to write us a short story re-imagining their favourite character in a new scene or scenariomaybe take inspiration from our series of lovely illustrations by artists who reimagined The Jungle Book too ? Continue reading...
TIME - Top Stories
a year
The Huffington Post
a year
So many people talk about it but don't actually do it. I think this quote is a solid response to the waiting for it to happen attitude, if travel is your bag (or backpack!) you need to stop saying no, get out of the armchair, and to the airport. - Gemma from Two Scots Abroad All things considered there are only two kinds of men in the world - those who stay at home and those who do not. The second are the more interesting" by Rudyard Kipling This travel quote is a favorite of mine as it's quite straightforward and adds a different slant to the well-worn 'travel broadens the mind' phrase, it assumes quite ingeniously that the more interesting folk have already been and seen! Needless to say it has certainly encouraged me to get out there and experience as much of the world as possible; has it made me any more interesting? Not sure, but I'd like to think it's made me a better person.
The Huffington Post
a year
What's worse, kids who fail at one level are not allowed to move on to "higher" ones... keep reading . Curio No. 975 | Genie, a real life wild child If you know the character Mowgli from Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book , growing up without human contact might seem adventurous. But when it happens in the real world, the results are much more disturbing. Such was the story of "Genie," a "wild child" who was discovered in Los Angeles in 1970. When social welfare workers found her at age 13, she looked about 7 and was unable to speak or express herself. She was physically underdeveloped, had extremely poor motor skills, could barely focus her eyes, and had the mental abilities of a 13-month old. She understood fewer than 20 words. State psychologists initially believed she had severe brain deficiencies, until they uncovered her story... keep reading .
Forbes
a year
With all the talk of the town centering around Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Walt Disney dropped what is a lovely bit of advertising for the next big would-be blockbuster, The Jungle Book. Jon Favreaus live-action (if you want to call it that) adaptation of their 1967 animated feature and/or the original 1894 Rudyard Kipling novel opens on April 15th.
Mind Shift
a year
The Huffington Post
a year
" But most of all, Wogan was a man who appealed to the masses. The rich, the famous, the middle class, the poor and the lowly. He had that magical ability to make everyone feel special. The rarest of gifts and a prime example of Rudyard Kipling's words: "If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with Kings -- nor lose the common touch, Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, And -- which is more -- you'll be a Man, my son!" -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
BBC 1 South East
a year
And it has been another crisp winter day, more details later. Rudyard Kipling was arguably Britains greatest author and poet in the days of Empire, writing stories such as the Jungle Book and poem If from his home at Bateman's in East Sussex.
BoingBoing
a year
It’s good fun. The old timey language took me a while to get used to, but after a few chapters the style and voice really enriched the story and made it feel even more like an adventure from another time. The plot meanders a bit, like an old black-and-white Saturday matinee movie, always begging you to turn the page to find out just one more secret, but I found that perfect for this kind of story. If you enjoy plunging into mysterious, sprawling worlds you will probably like it too. I enjoyed returning to it again and again each night as I read. The book itself is beautiful, comprised of five interconnectedbooks” or stories printed on finger-pleasing paper stock made to look aged in the printing process. It sounds silly, but I found these little touches helped to transport me back in (fictitious) time as I read about secret parts of the world, hidden histories and big adventures.