Politico
3 hours
As if to hammer home the point, Scott, the 58-year-old pastor from Cleveland, recounted his experiences wandering freely around Trump’s office and campaign headquarters on November 7 and 8, chatting with Melania Trump about his grandchildren and grilling Brad Parscale about early voting numbers as the campaign’s digital director sat on his desk, breezily tossing around a Nerf football. “Donald Trump was able, in the words of Rudyard Kipling, to walk with kings and to keep the common touch. He kept the grassroots around him. He took us and made us national figures,” Scott said. “Rather than the elites and the snobs and the upper crust.” Indeed, what the week’s festivities lacked in size — the Financial Times estimated a paltry inauguration showing of 250,000 — they made up for in the sheer improbability of the newly minted bold-faced names that did show up.
Al Jazeera
10 days
The Guardian - Books
10 days
The Huffington Post
16 days
A real estate hustler/reality TV star notorious for slapping his name on everything making a very serious stab at the White House ... Man, that made Marvel movies seem like Shakespeare! But if it's a science fictional world, why not the best? Besides, there was something oddly familiar about it. I never saw the movie (which has not yet been made), but I may have read the book. Leonard Nimoy reads part I of Robert A. Heinlein's ' Future History ' story about Rhysling, the blind bard of the spaceways, ' The Green Hills of Earth .' Think of a cross between Rudyard Kipling and Bob Dylan. Seventy-five years ago, way back in late but still pre-Pearl Harbor 1941, two young science fiction writers on opposite coasts -- beached former naval officer Heinlein and bookish Columbia PhD-to-be Asimov, worked out what would become famous fictional formulations of humanity's future on this planet and beyond.
Plymouth Herald
a month
Open Culture
a month
Later he would have a second career capitalizing on his horror pedigree, hosting anthology shows on television, and reading not just tales of Edgar Allan Poe on vinyl , but other not-so-scary children’s lit, like Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories and the fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen . Unlike Bela Lugosi, who suffered from being typecast his entire career post- Dracula , Karloff was able to make a good career from that breakthrough performance with good humor. Karloff’s reading of How the Grinch Stole Christmas is pretty much taken straight from the animated TV special with some judicious editing and no commercials to get in the way. Side note: It is not Karloff but Thurl Ravenscroft singing “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch.” He was not credited in the original cartoon and Dr. Seuss profoundly apologized after the fact. The record would go on to earn Karloff a Spoken Word Grammy Award, the only such entertainment award he ever won.
Dover Express
2 months
BBC One South East
2 months
Well, sort of! Rudyard Kipling Primary is one of the first schools in the country to get their hands on new virtual reality goggles with the idea of bringing far flung places to the classroom, regardless of budget. Our education correspondent, Bryony MacKenzie, has been to see what it's all about.
Den of Geek
3 months
Sputnik International
3 months
When at its peak in the early 1920s, the British Empire controlled the lives of 428 million people, roughly a quarter of the world's population at the time, and likewise covered a quarter of the globe. It was an empire so huge that upon it, in the words of its most famous chronicler Rudyard Kipling, the sun never set.
Phys.Org
3 months
Everyone loves animal oddities. Darwin and Lamarck pondered the advantages of the giraffe's long legs and neck, while a few decades later Rudyard Kipling explained how the leopard got its spots. Today genome sequencing is fleshing out what we thought we knew about some distinctive animal adaptations, from the giraffe to the leopard.
The Event Chronicle
4 months
Open Culture
4 months
This advice sounds rather utilitarian, doesnt it? What about passion, inspiration, the muse? Eh, you dont have time for those things. If you want to be successful like Robert Heinlein, you’ve got to write stories, lots of ‘em, stories people want to publish and pay for, stories people want to read. Heinlein spends the bulk of his essay advising us on how to write such stories, with a proviso, in an epigram from Rudyard Kipling, that “there are nine-and-sixty ways / Of constructing tribal lays / And every single one of them is right.” After, however, describing in detail how he writes a “human interest” science fiction story, Heinlein then gets down to business. He assumes that we can type, know the right formats or can learn them, and can spell, punctuate, and use grammar as our “wood-carpenter’s sharp tools.” These prerequisites met, all we really need to write speculative fiction are the five rules below: 1.
ITV
4 months
The thing that I always remember about David Cameron was the lambs about Rudyard Kipling, and he said if you can meet triumph and disaster and treat those two imposters the same. He was able to handle baddies and goodies in his stride and not get overexcited. I think sometimes people interpreted that as being relaxed. In fact, it was a very good temperament for being Prime Minister.
Washington Free Beacon
4 months
In 2013, Cambridge University Press published a collection of 100 poems by Rudyard Kipling selected by Thomas Pinney, editor of the three-volume scholarly edition of Kipling’s poetry, also published by Cambridge. The point of the shorter 100 Poems: Old and New was to show us how vibrant and diverse Kipling’s poetry could be—to change, as William Logan put it in his review at the New York Times , “the way we think about a poet whose poetry we scarcely think about at all.” The book was an abject failure, at least according to Logan. The poems were flat, sentimental, and dated. Instead of sparking new interest in Kipling, the volume confirmed, Logan wrote, rightly or wrongly, that the “world that adored his poems is not our world.” Cambridge is back with a new selection of 100 poems—this time from the work of George Herbert—and it is, for the most part, a pleasure to read.
The Huffington Post
5 months
From Disney animation comes the live action film, The Jungle Book , based on the classic books by Rudyard Kipling. A contemporary reboot of the beloved 1967 film, it captures your attention from the opening scene and holds through to the very end. Its stellar voice talent cast supports newcomer, young Neel Sethi who plays Mowgli. The story follows the man-cub Mowgli who flees the jungle after a threat from the tiger Shere Khan. Guided by Bagheera the panther and the bear Baloo, Mowgli embarks on a journey of self-discovery. KIDS FIRST! Film Critic Ryan R. comments, "What I like most about this movie is the 3D animation and the voice acting. The animals look so realistic and the sets look amazing as well with very detailed backgrounds. What I liked about the bonus features on the Blu-ray disc is a feature called, The Jungle Book Reimagined which shows ideas for the remake of The Jungle Book and Neel Sethi's experience while acting on the set.
Plymouth Herald
5 months
Hundreds of people gathered in the centre of Plymouth this afternoon to watch the latest version of The Jungle Book shown on the Big Screen.The live action version of the Rudyard Kipling classic is being shown as part of a series of films on the Big Screen this summer.The film includes all your favourite scenes from the Dinsey original, and proved a hit with the Plymouth audience.
The Huffington Post
5 months
That was really exhilarating. That is the takeaway--that people look back at both as a point of demarcation about saying that was a kind of landmark, cinematic moment for me but more importantly I had an emotional response to the movie." Experience passion of Rob Legato and Brigham Taylor and their magic of The Jungle Book on Blu-Ray and DVD on August 30th! Based on Rudyard Kipling's eponymous collective works and inspired by Walt Disney's 1967 animated film of the same name,Disney's The Jungle Book brings storytelling to live action. After a threat from the tiger Shere Khan forces him to flee the jungle, a man-cub named Mowgli embarks on a journey of self discovery with the help of panther, Bagheera, and free-spirited bear, Baloo. ---- Find out more about Julee Morrison on Facebook ©2016 Julee Morrison, as first published on Mommy's Memorandum -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms.
BBC News 24
5 months
It is fabulous. It was bequeathed to the National Trust in 1976 by Rudyard Kipling's daughter and was landscaped in part by capability Brown. It was referred to -- he was referred to as the Shakespeare of gardening.
Leicester Mercury
5 months
An Indian Summer are hosting a family friendly outdoor cinema event this weekend to launch the City Festival.An inflatable 20 metre screen which will be showing The Jungle Book will be built on the High Street side of Jubilee Square on Friday.There will be live music from House of Verse from 5pm until 8.30pm in a tent opposite the screen which will show the film at 8.45pm.The 2016 film, based on Rudyard Kipling's books and the 1967 animated film, introduces the fabulous Neel Sethi as Mowgli, and...
The Guardian - Sport
5 months
Olympic champion says mediahavent taken it easy on me’ • Briton is concentrating on emulating the feat of Lasse Virén If Rudyard Kipling’s adage about treating triumph and disaster the same is a standard trope for Olympians, then for the three-time champion Mo Farah it now might be rewritten to include elation and suspicion. The morning after the night on which he became Olympic 10,000m champion for the second time, Farah said defending his 5,000m title would be a lot harder than it was in London four years ago. Continue reading...
The Huffington Post
6 months
Rudyard Kipling once claimed, "Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind." Indeed, give too little and you'll make the customer feel misunderstood; administer too much and the customer will feel like you're pandering. Getting to the sweet spot is an art, one that will take a few failures, but nevertheless worthy of your time and effort. In many ways support is the foundation of any growing company. A weak foundation can crumble a home, but a strong one sustains it. In fact, Jason Lemkin, former founder of EchoSign and venture capitalist, would argue that it is service that separates young companies from the pack. Comcast may rather be feared than loved, but Lemkin contests that if you want to go the distance, you have make the effort to wow customers: However, if word-of-mouth matters. If second-order revenue and upgrades and upsells matter .
The Huffington Post
6 months
European civilization is undoubtedly the dominant, and exceptionally innovative, trend of the past two or three centuries. It wasn't always so. The Sumerian, Babylonian, Chinese, Indian, Greek and Roman civilizations for instance all borrowed from one another while intermittently occupying the heights of global power as far as it extended then. During what Europeans came to dub the Dark Ages, the Islamic culture provided a bridge to the ancient Greco-Roman culture through five or six centuries. Much of the Renaissance benefited from those preserved roots. To cut a long story short, any assumption that the now dominant Euro-Christian civilization has exclusive roots is highly debatable. Roots of all civilizations lie in exchange and migration. Then there is King's use during that televised argument of two adjectives: white and Western. Is 'white race' a valid concept? Did it ever exist in our historical vocabulary until the advent of a phase of European colonial expansion in recent centuries? Did the genesis of the white man's burden lie in Rudyard Kipling's inventive mind or was it decreed to be so by history's destiny? These are questions that probably need examination before making assumptions about a primordial white 'race' or, for that matter, black race or brown race or Mongolian race comprising people of singularly defined characteristics more than shades of skin color or facial appearance.
Politico
6 months
Frank Buckley, the George Mason University law school professor who helped write Donald J. Trump Jr.'s convention speech, on Wednesday brushed off the controversy around the younger Trump's use of a couple of Buckley's previously published lines, saying he had actually borrowed them from someone else. “We all borrow,” Buckley said in an email to POLITICO, referencing Rudyard Kipling's poem, When Omer Smote 'Is Bloomin' Lyre . “You read things. You make them part of you. Then you forget where you got them from. A lot of life is like that.” Buckley explained that the two lines in question (Our schools used to be an elevator to the middle class. Now they are stalled on the ground floor, and They're like Soviet-era department stores that are run for the benefit of the clerks and not the customers.) were from his book The Way Back that was published earlier this year and that he had recycled them for some op-eds and articles.