BBC Radio Wales
2 days
long time ago you may remember the case of the wyatt's child are you all know that rhyme with the case of conjoined twins you made remember the case of Tony Bland and it goes back to the principles have been laid down early since the band case that was the big Turning Point and since then the courts of check out exactly how this this balancing this so difficult bouncing exercise Skylander claim to be doing it objective late I sometimes wonder how objective you can actually be but they're definitely trying to be a detective are we likely to see more of this location to go to Medical Science advances yes we are firstly because we are identifying more of these string of rare syndromes and so we can actually discuss what's going on a bear for the prospects are rather just saying this child is very sick and we don't.
Voice Of America
2 days
“It’s been really recent advances, both in screening methodologies as well as data science, that actually makes it possible,” said Jim Flatt, Hampton Creek’s chief of research and development. Beyond burger In the lab of another company, Beyond Meat, scientists re-created a hamburger patty out of proteins from yellow peas, soy and beets for the look of blood. The scientists are breaking down the building blocks of meat and going into the plant kingdom to look for those same elements. They’re then rebuilding them into a new kind of food that uses plant-based protein to create a patty that looks just like a beef patty “What we’re doing is we’re taking plant matter. We’re running it through heating, cooling and pressure and that’s basically stitching together the proteins so they take on the fibrous texture of animal muscle,” said Beyond Meat founder Ethan Brown These companies say plants hold the key to solving global food problems.
Futurity
3 days
New excavations at two exceptionally well-preserved Ice Age sites on the northern coast of Peru provide a rich record of the lives of some of the earliest humans to populate the Western Hemisphere. The findings, published today in Science Advances , suggest a more leisurely pace of migration down some stretches of the Pacific coast of South America than originally believed. The finds include stone tools, remains of plants and marine animals including fish and sea lions, and bits of woven rushes. Put together, they indicate that late-Ice Age and early-Holocene humans, though typically very mobile at that time, were well established in the area for several thousand years. It may be that we've captured, archeologically, an instance where people just did not move quickly down the coastline but rather settled in for a good long while, says lead author Tom Dillehay, professor of anthropology at Vanderbilt University.
Futurism
5 days
Alive and Breathing If it was up to a team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the next trend in sportswear would be clothes made out of living cells. You got that right, living microbial cells. With a design that looks like it came straight out of science fiction, the self-ventilating workout suit developed by the MIT researchers gives a new meaning to breathable and no-sweat clothing — plus, it comes with a pair of running shoes lined with the same living cells on the inside. [W]e propose to use genetically tractable microbial cells to create multifunctional, moisture-responsive interfaces, the researchers wrote in a study published in Science Advances . We hypothesized that microbial cells can be used as functional building blocks for constructing moisture-responsive materials. The cells that researchers used are the most common nonpathogenic strain of E.
TIME - Top Stories
5 days
Homo Deus argues that the principles that have organized society will undergo a huge shift in the 21 st century, with major consequences for life as we know it. So far, the things that have shaped societywhat we measure ourselves byhave been some combination of religious rules about how to live a good life, and more earthly goals like getting rid of sickness, hunger, and war. We have organized to meet basic human needs: being happy, healthy, and in control of the environment around us. Taking these goals to their logical conclusion, Harari says humans are striving for bliss, immortality, and divinity. What would the world be like if we actually achieved those things? This is not entirely idle speculation. War and violence are at historical lows and still declining . Advances in science and technology will help people live much longer and go a long way toward ending disease and hunger.
Futurity
5 days
When the patient is newly diagnosed and possibly still in the emergency department is when it is most important to check the boxes of the three-hour bundle, Levy says. Minutes matter, and it is critical to perform the correct tests and get the patient antibiotics as fast as possible. In an editorial in the same issue of the journal, Tina Batra Hershey of the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health and Jeremy M. Kahn of Pitt Public Health and the department of critical care medicine examine the potential of additional state sepsis mandates in light of the new study and the regulations—that they say represent a major shift in the use of health policy to improve the quality of health care, rather than using market-based incentives and reimbursement penalties. Sepsis is a public health crisis worthy of a policy response, they write, adding that such policies should give hospitals the flexibility to ensure they can evolve as the science of sepsis care advances.
Futurity
5 days
Voice Of America
6 days
S. tree species have shifted more than 25 miles west (45 kilometers) and 20 miles (33 kilometers) north, the researchers reported in the journal Science Advances Wednesday. One of the more striking examples is the scarlet oak, which in nearly three decades has moved more than 127 miles (205 kilometers) to the northwest from the Appalachians, he said. Now it’s reduced in the Southeast and more popular in the Midwest. “This analysis provides solid evidence that changes are occurring,” former U.S. Forest Chief Michael Dombeck said in an email. “It’s critical that we not ignore what analyses like these and what science is telling us about what is happening in nature.” Dryer South, wetter West The westward movement helped point to climate change, especially wetter weather, as the biggest of many culprits behind the shift, Fei said. The researchers did factor in people cutting down trees and changes to what trees are planted and where, he said.
The Economist - Science
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But will it help him learn? FOR sunny places not connected to the electricity grid, the falling price of solar panels and LED lighting promises a bright future. No more smoky, lung-damaging kerosene lamps. Greater security and safety. More ways to connect with the world—even if that involves only something as simple as being able to charge a mobile phone. And, above all, the chance to work or study into the evening and thus improve both a family’s immediate economic circumstances and its children’s future prospects. It is a tale of hope. But as a study just published in Science Advances , by Michaël Aklin of the University of Pittsburgh and his colleagues, shows, these potentially glowing benefits can in some cases amount to not very much at all. More than 1bn people around the world have no access to electricity. Providing them with off-grid solar power is something almost all development experts agree is A Good Thing. Yet the... Continue reading
Techradar
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A team of scientists based out of the University of Florida has created a way of printing 3D objects suspended in a near solid structure, opening the door to the printing of complex organic structures. There are currently methods for printing organs, which is a pretty incredible sentence to type, but these are met by the hurdle that soft materials are difficult to print in a way that they maintain their structure during the printing process. This has meant that complex organs that require space in their construction (like the heart with its many chambers) are incredibly difficult to print. In the paper published on Science Advances , the team led by Christopher S. OBryan has vaulted this hurdle by printing directly into soft solid structures made of micro-organogels that can hold soft structures in place during printing. Vigorous fluid pumping The specific viscosity of these gels are a vital part of the process, as if the printed material was suspended in a liquid, there would be no way of ensuring accurate placement as the printed matter would float away.
Mashable
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Phys.Org
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(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers from Stanford University has studied the energy used by a type of small parrot as it hops from branch to branch during foraging. As they note in their paper uploaded to the open access site Science Advances, Diana Chin and David Lentink found that the bird's techniques optimized energy expenditure and may have been similar to techniques used by dinosaurs that led to flight.
Phys.Org
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(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the U.S. and the U.K. has found that governmental initiatives to provide electricity to poor communities in India has not brought about the socioeconomic benefits that were predicted. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes a survey they carried out involving people living in non-electrified communities in India and a follow-up they conducted after some of those involved in the prior survey gained access to electricity.
Mashable
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NPR
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Phys.Org
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NASA
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Washington Free Beacon
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The Event Chronicle
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“No one claims that inflation has become certain; scientific theories dont get proved the way mathematical theorems do, but as time passes, the successful ones become better and better established by improved experimental tests and theoretical advances. This has happened with inflation.” The three dissident scientists have stuck to their guns and have published an FAQ in response, in which they maintain that “what began in the 1980s as a theory that seemed to make definite predictions has become a theory that makes no definite predictions.” It seems this heated debate is far from over. This article ( Stephen Hawking among 33 scientists on offensive against critics of popular universe origin theory ) was originally published on RT News and syndicated by The Event Chronicle .
Politico
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Under the law, the EPA has set national limits for 89 dangerous chemicals, bacteria and viruses. But nearly all of those limits were set between 1986 and 1996, when Congress required the EPA to analyze and regulate chemicals at a steady clip. Water utilities complained they couldnt keep pace, and in 1996, Congress updated the law to leave it up to the EPA to decide when to set new regulations. It also required a new and extensive review process for any new standards. In the 20 years since that update went into effect, not a single new contaminant has been regulated under the law. Meanwhile, tens of thousands of new chemicals have come into use, with more than 85,000 now on the market. Advances in technology and science have shown that long-used chemicals can spread more than previously though, and can present dangers at even low levels. But little has been done at the federal level to set safer limits for older chemicals, assess the health impact of new substances making their way into the water supply, or even monitor regularly for potential contaminants in the drinking water that millions of Americans ingest every day.
Phys.Org
6 months
Futurity
5 months
Voice Of America
5 months
The Event Chronicle
3 months