Asia Today
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Asia Today
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Sputnik International
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PETALING JAYA: A-Rank Bhd’s net profit for the second quarter ended Jan 31, 2017 rose 10.43% to RM3.78 million from RM3.42 million a year ago, in line with higher pre-tax profit achieved due to better margins. In a filing with Bursa Malaysia yesterday, the group said its pre-tax profit for the quarter rose 20.05% to RM4.88 million from RM4.06 million a year ago. Revenue for the quarter fell 10.53% to RM114.59 million from RM128.08 million a year ago due to lower business volume although average selling prices were higher as a result of the increase in raw material costs. Its revenue from Southeast Asia, excluding Malaysia, rose 15.5% during the quarter to RM28.23 million from RM24.44 million a year ago. However, revenue from Malaysia fell 11.09% to RM76.09 million from RM85.58 million a year ago while revenue from others (countries in Africa, Europe and South Asia) fell 43.
Voice Of America
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The Week
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A highlight is a lavish burial suit built for a Han princess comprising more than 2,000 pieces of jade. The precious stone was chosen to signify purification of the body and protection from corruption. Also featured is an array of tomb figurines, which took the place of living attendants to forever serve those who had passed. The impact of nearby Persian and Hellenistic kingdoms comes through in towering stone sculptures featuring a crouching lion – a creature not native to China – and fluted columns adorned with dragons. Meanwhile the influence of maritime trade, which created a route into China for spices, gemstones, glasswork and metalwork from South and Southeast Asia, is exemplified in animals carved from orange-hued carnelian and necklaces made from amethyst, aquamarine, beryl and rock crystal. A number of groups also managed to retain their own distinctive culture under Han rule; one such is the Dian people, and a number of bronze ornaments will be on display depicting their distinct festivals and rituals.
Voice Of America
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Richard Horsey, a Yangon-based business consultant, said foreign investors are hoping for greater confidence in the government and its policy direction. Foreign direct investment (FDI) fell sharply as new real estate legislation, policy uncertainties, and “red tapecurbed interest in one of Southeast Asia’s fastest growing economies. “A number of factors that are putting off foreign investors, which has seen foreign direct investment (FDI) dip this year compared to last year by around 30 per cent it looks like. That is quite a significant dip at a time when Myanmar is running a high trade deficit and desperately needs foreign investment to balance the books as well as to drive growth,” Horsey told VOA. Government ministers enthusiastic But government ministers are calling on investors to “capitalize on the opportunities,” including new investment laws geared to transparency and fairer ways to invest.
ABC News - International
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South China Morning Post
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A Chinese tourist on a Southeast Asia trip with his wife has accused a tour guide of damaging his passport because he did not spend enough money in Thailand. The man, who used the pseudonym Li Zhonghai, returned to China after he was not allowed on a flight from Thailand to Singapore last Thursday because the first page in his passport had a small slit, West China City Daily reported. Li had booked a 10-day package holiday with his wife to Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia from March 18 with a...
The Sun Daily
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The Sun Daily
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What this all means is that no single country could ever defeat the Khazarian Globalists which try to impose their own standards to people of different cultures, i.e. those same set of standards which the Globalists they are not in compliance with. ‘Arming Saudi Arabia & Bahrain risks complicity with war crimes’ – Amnesty to Trump So, while the West is in the process of bringing down the House of Saud for its ownPivot to Asia,” i.e. increasing engagement with China, Southeast Asia and Japan, could we accelerate the process of eliminating the Khazarian Mafia from all of its power centers inside Western governments and institutions for good? Or, do we need only to wait for another Rockefeller, or a Rothchild this time around, to just flattened out with cardiac arrest? This article ( Bringing Down the House of Saud ) was originally published on Covert Geopolitics and syndicated by The Event Chronicle .
Voice Of America
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Voice Of America
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The stairs are worn down by a millennia of use, but soon the footsteps on some of Myanmar’s most sacred temples may cease amid concerns about the damage done by increasing numbers of tourists. The sprawling site of Bagan, home to well over 2,000 mostly Buddhist monuments that date back as far as 1057 AD, has become a major lure for travelers as Myanmar becomes an increasingly popular destination. But as fears grow for the holy sites over the architectural - and cultural - impact of those in search of a good view, so too do calls to ban temple climbing altogether. In search of something more At 34-years-old, Charles de Valois quit his job in digital marketing and set off traveling through Southeast Asia in search of something more. Valois told VOA that Myanmar had been a particularly appealing prospect - somewhere he’d heard good things about from friends.
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The Week
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What's been happening recently? Their plight made international headlines in 2015 when thousands of Rohingya were left stranded on boats in southeast Asia with no food or water because no country was willing to welcome them. Last year, scores of Rohingya were killed and tens of thousands forced to flee to Bangladesh after a major military operation was launched against them. A preliminary UN investigation, based on interviews with hundreds of refugees, concluded that security forces subjected the Rohingya to rape, torture and killings that most probably amount to crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing. "The report included accounts of an eight-month-old and a five-year-old being slaughtered with knives as their mothers were raped," The BBC reports. Meanwhile democracy icon and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi has kept largely quiet about the Rohingya crisis since her party came to power in 2015, ending decades of military rule.
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