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According to Obama , Brzezinski is a personal mentor of his, an “outstanding friend” from whom he has learned immensely. In light of this knowledge, is it any surprise that we saw so many conflicts erupt out of nowhere during Obama’s presidency? On February 7, 2014, the BBC published a transcript of a bugged phone conversation between Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland and the U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, Geoffrey Pyatt. In that phone call, the representatives were discussing who they wanted to place in the Ukrainian government following a coup that ousted Russian-aligned president Viktor Yanukovych. Lo and behold, Brzezinski himself advocated taking over Ukraine in his 1998 book, The Grand Chessboard, stating Ukraine was “a new and important space on the Eurasian chessboard…a geopolitical pivot because its very existence as an independent country (means) Russia ceases to be a Eurasian empire.
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The second Ibis hotel is under construction on the southern side of the main railway station. It is supposed to open by the end of the year. Expansion Back in 2011, plans were made to open a second Ibis hotel next to the southern exit of the Kyiv Central Railway Station. The construction started, but was frozen due to the EuroMaidan Revolution that drove Kremlin-backed President Viktor Yanukovych from power on Feb. 22, 2014, triggering Russia's invasion of Ukraine and a war that continues today. The war has hit the hotel industry hard, including Ibis, where 6070 percent of the guests are business travelers. Davidenko said that occupancy fell 20 percent in 2014, but has recovered since. If it wasnt for the war, the second Ibis could have opened two years ago, he said. Now its opening is planned for autumn. The construction of the 280-room hotel at 6 Polzunova St.
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The Bloc of Petro Poroshenko comes second with 79 percent of its lawmakers voting in favor of president’s bills. The percentage is lower because of problems with “factional discipline,” experts say. Unsurprisingly, the Opposition Bloc party, which mainly consists of allies of former President Viktor Yanukovych, votes the least for Poroshenko’s bills. During his rule, Poroshenko has vetoed 39 laws passed by parliament. However, parliament then went on to pass 15 of them with amendments. Still on top Sushko from the Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation said that according to a range of polls, Poroshenko’s ratings have fallen dramatically, but he would still win out over other politicians if elections were held in the near future. “Poroshenko stands with his feet between the new and the old Ukraine,” Sushko said. “One foot is in the past, and one in the future.
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The Bloc of Petro Poroshenko comes second with 79 percent of its lawmakers voting in favor of president’s bills. The percentage is lower because of problems with “factional discipline,” experts say. Unsurprisingly, the Opposition Bloc party, which mainly consists of allies of former President Viktor Yanukovych, votes the least for Poroshenko’s bills. During his rule, Poroshenko has vetoed 39 laws passed by parliament. However, parliament then went on to pass 15 of them with amendments. Still on top Sushko from the Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation said that according to a range of polls, Poroshenko’s ratings have fallen dramatically, but he would still win out over other politicians if elections were held in the near future. “Poroshenko stands with his feet between the new and the old Ukraine,” Sushko said. “One foot is in the past, and one in the future.
KyivPost
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London-based analyst Timothy Ash called the IMF findings pretty much as expected and said July looks like key month on legislative front. Ash said that Ukrainian Prime Minister Volodymyr Groysman will have to pull off some magic to get all this through the Rada before deputies jet off for summer vacations abroad. The problem, Ash wrote, is that the ruling coalition lacks a working majority so might have to reach out to members of the Opposition Bloc whose members are tied to ex-President Viktor Yanukovych and Ukrainian billionaire oligarch Rinat Akhmetov. Ash wrote that the legislative agenda demanded by the IMF is more likely to drag into autumn. On the anti-graft agenda, the administration needs to collect in the numerous get out of jail for free cards' which seem to have been sprayed around in the past by various administrations.
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Transparency International Ukraine may file civil cases on behalf of the Ukrainian people with regard to $40 billion allegedly stolen by Viktor Yanukovych, the group’s head has said. “That’s something we are considering,” said Jose Ugaz, Transparency International’s global chairman, in an interview with the Kyiv Post on May 22. Ugaz declined to provide details on what those filings would look like, but said that Ukraine’s failure to act on the Yanukovych case is “a scandal for the world.” “It’s a shame for Ukraine that after so many years, and it being so obvious that this guy was involved in serious schemes of corruption, that nothing is happening,” he said. Ugaz’s trip to Kyiv on May 2223 for an anti-corruption workshop is his second visit to Ukraine since being elected chair of Transparency International in 2014. On his last trip, the 57-year old Peruvian attorney met President Petro Poroshenko and Prosecutor General Yuriy Lutsenko, both of whom told him at the time that there was “political will” to tackle corruption.
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However, the partnership didnt flourish, as Ukraine made little headway in democracy, rule of law and fighting corruptionvalues important to Japan, the world’s third largest economy and a member of the Group of Seven industrial democracies. Ex-President Viktor Yanukovych instead emphasized Ukraine’s relations with communist China. There was also a scandal involving the misuse of 470 million euros given by Japan in 20092010 under the Kyoto Protocol climate change agreement. Ukraine was supposed to spend the funds on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, but failed to do so. According to a later agreement with Japan in 2015, Ukraine returned 2.5 million euros and reallocated the rest of the unused money to new projects. After the EuroMaidan Revolution drove Yanukovych from power on Feb. 22, 2014, relations have become more active, thanks largely to Japan’s generosity and unwavering support for Ukraine. n The post World in Ukraine: Ukraine, Japan closer than they seem appeared first on KyivPost .