Techradar
6 minutes
The US Senate has voted to cast aside privacy regulations that stop ISPs from sharing users browser data (and other personal information) with third-parties. The Senate voted 50-48 (following party lines) to overturn the regulations which were approved by the FCC last autumn, with todays decision meaning that the rules shall have no force or effect, as Ars Technica reports. Specifically, the FCCs rules want to force ISPs to have to get consent from the user before they can sell or share data pertaining to that user including browsing history, app usage, and personal information that could include financial or health details. With the regulations, users would have to opt-in to allow this sort of information to be shared. Without them, there is no need for ISPs to get consent before they can make use of their subscribers data.
South China Morning Post
28 minutes
Politico
32 minutes
Politico
37 minutes
” “My father and I are very close,” he said. “I talk to him a lot. We’re pretty inseparable.” President Trump and his White House have argued that the commander in chief is exempt from any conflicts of interest but that he handed over management of his company to fully focus on his administration. Lawyers for the president have said the company wont enter any new foreign deals and that any new domestic deals must be approved by an ethics adviser. Ethicists, however, have repeatedly criticized the arrangement, which they contend doesn't go far enough to separate the president from his massive business empire. “The statement that the president made earlier that he wasnt going to talk to his children about the business sounded good, but the reality was there was no way to enforce it,” Larry Noble, general counsel of the nonpartisan Campaign Legal Center and a former chief ethics officer at the Federal Election Commission, told Forbes.
KyivPost
an hour
Money News Steet Talk
an hour
BBC Parliament
an hour
Lincolnshire Echo
an hour
An application for 1,400 homes that will change the face of Sleaford has been approved by a planning committee.Officials debated the application for the Drove and permission was granted for the site that is based on greenfield land between the western edge of town and the A15.Now it has been revealed work on the homes, two schools and a medical centre could get under way within two years.READ MORE: 1,400 homes, hotel and two new schools approved for Lincolnshire One of the people representing...
The Sun Daily - World News
2 hours
USA Today - Top Stories
2 hours
Watford Observer
2 hours
Fast Company
2 hours
Trump just gave the massive oil pipeline project new life. There's only one problem: the bad economics of the oil industry. Trump just gave the massive oil pipeline project new life. There's only one problem: the bad economics of the oil industry. On January 24, his fourth day in office, Trump tried to resurrect the Keystone XL Pipeline. He invited TransCanada, the company behind the pipeline, to reapply for a presidential permit that the Obama administration had rejected in 2015. Two days later, TransCanada filed the application. On March 24, it announced that the pipeline had been reapproved . But that doesn't necessarily mean that the pipeline is guaranteed to be built. Read Full Story
MintPress News
2 hours
President Donald Trump shows his signature on an executive order on the Keystone XL pipeline, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP/Evan Vucci) Published in partnership with True Activist . Before the struggle over the Dakota Access pipeline came to the forefront of national news, there was the Keystone XL pipeline. Commissioned in 2010 by the TransCanada corporation, the seven-year-long debate over the pipeline’s future has been symbolic of the fight over the future of the United Statesenergy policy in the face of diminishing fossil fuel supplies and climate change. While former President Barack Obama won the approval of environmentalists in 2015 for his rejection of the pipeline, his successor Donald Trump has now put an end to the debate by officially issuing the necessary permits for the project’s completion.
BBC One London
2 hours
of 90,000 has been approved by Brent Council. Spurs now have until the end of the month to activate their option to play at the national stadium. Well, time for a look at the weather
The Economic Times
2 hours
BBC Parliament
3 hours
unfortunately -- that have, unfortunately, been a number of recent examples where retrospective legislation has been a necessity, normally because of what can only be put down as cross errors, I think, by the Government at the time. The mental health approval functions act 2012, for example was rushed through parliament because it became apparent that approximately 2000 doctors who were dealing with mental health issues had not been properly approved, and health issues had not been properly.
ABC News - International
5 hours
China Daily
5 hours
Kentish Express
5 hours
Fast Company
5 hours
Trump is expected to give the massive oil pipeline new life shortly. There's only one problem: the bad economics of the oil industry. Trump is expected to give the massive oil pipeline new life shortly. There's only one problem: the bad economics of the oil industry. On January 24, his fourth day in office, Trump tried to resurrect the Keystone XL Pipeline. He invited TransCanada, the company behind the pipeline, to reapply for a presidential permit that the Obama administration had rejected in 2015. Two days later, TransCanada filed the application. Read Full Story
Daily Mail - USA
6 hours
The NFL is producing a video to explain to players the league-approved touchdown celebrations ahead of next season, after a number of stars were fined thousands during throughout 2016.
SABC Digital News
6 hours
Nottingham Evening Post
6 hours
Letterboxes on an estate in Nuthall have been sealed for security reasons after postmen lost the keys. Royal Mail have sealed four post boxes on the Horsendale Estate, which has 950 houses on it, until the locks can be changed. Read more: Plans approved for new Lidl, retail complex and 24 apartments in CliftonCouncillor Philip Owen, who represents Nuthall on Nottinghamshire County Council, said: It's massively inconvenient for residents. A number of them are elderly and it really...
TIME - Top Stories
6 hours
A panel of judges at Taiwan's Supreme Court on Friday began hearing deliberations in a landmark case that could see the island become the first nation in Asia to allow same-sex marriage. The case which stems from the rejection of a gay activist's attempt to marry his partner in 2013 has been helped along by municipal authorities in Taipei seeking clarity over other gay-marriage requests, the BBC reports. It comes amid parliamentary debate on legalizing gay marriage that has divided public opinion and provoked protests from conservatives. Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan's President, has expressed support for marriage equality in the past and the first draft of a bill to legalize same-sex marriage was approved by Taiwan's parliament in December. Since then, however, anti-same-sex-marriage campaigners have grown more vocal in protesting the bill.