Core77
4 days
A constant irritation I experience in the shop is having the vacuum hose snag on something. Even suspended from a ceiling-mounted bungie, it will sometimes catch the end of the saw track (usually in mid-cut) or the edge of the table if I'm sanding and have given the hose too much slack. Australian cabinetmaker David Stanton had the same problem, but solved it handily with this inexpensive fix (and no, it's not Festool-specific): I am so doing this. If anyone's in the same boat, I found braided sleeving, at least with the inside diameter I need for a little over a buck a foot on McMaster . They've got the heat-shrink tubing too, $13 and change for four one-foot lengths (the minimum buy). If anyone else has other sources in other regions, please do list in the comments.
Core77
10 days
Last week I posted the following challenge : Match up, with their trades, seven engravings of old workbench designs from the Diderot Encyclopedia. I didn't expect it to be easy, but I thought it an interesting way to allow people to look at benches critically and try to figure out what particular design features would be good for. Here are the answers: See the double screw vise in the one below? That marks it as a type of bench used for cabinetmaking or marquetry . 18th century French cabinetmakers were far more specialized in their work than their modern counterparts, and a cabinetmaker would mostly be doing the fine part of assembly, smaller joints, and marquetry and veneering if they were capable. The double vise is perfect for clamping boards for joinery, and the uncluttered benchtop is great for assembly. In those days "go-bars," flexible sticks of wood that sprung against the work and ceiling, was a common method of clamping on a wide surface and it would have been easy to lay out your panels on the bench, and use a bunch of go-bars to put all the downward pressure you wanted on it.
Radar Online
23 days
Christina and Tarek El Moussa entered a flop of a deal, RadarOnline.com can exclusively reveal! Their business partner, Pete de Best , sued a cabinetmaker on behalf of their company, Next Level Property Investments LLC in an explosive 2013 filing. The couple claimed they had wired Dean R. Schaeffer $7,000 for a deposit on cabinets for a home they owned at the time, but “the cabinets were ever delivered to the home [they] hired him for.” They were suing for $5,000. READ the documents! Their trial was postponed after it was discovered that a form was not filled out correctly. Then, neither party appeared in court on their hearing date. PHOTOS: Secret Arrests & Scripting Scenes! ‘Alaskan Bush People’s Top 10 Lies & Scandals The case was dismissed without prejudice by the court. Now, the Flip or Flop stars are living apart after separating earlier this year .
Core77
3 months
Stickley and other AC designs were meant to be made in a factory by machine, or made by hand by amateurs. Rich people did buy Greene Greene, Frank Lloyd Wright, or Charles Rennie Mackintosh furniture, but those three designers were far more decorative than the simple lines of more universal AC designers. Greene Greene Wright Mackintosh Going back even further in time, Shaker furniture might be very popular as a modern project, but it's joiner's work, not what a cabinetmaker of the early 1800s strove for. The illustration below is an 1836 plate from The Practical Cabinet-Maker with Numerous Illustrative Engravings by Peter and Michael Angelo Nicholson: That's a sexy divan—just perfect for pitching woo to Mrs. Divinia Parson's daughter. The Shakers were celibate, and their sofas and beds were austere and frankly not as much fun.
Core77
6 months
Complicated projects can be broken down into manageable pieces, and with each project, you will get better. Here's just one idea to get you making sawdust: The first project in The Joiner and Cabinetmaker is a nailed together packing crate. You don't need many tools to make it. It's only marginally useful when it's done, but if you are learning to use tools I can't imagine a better use of your time than cutting up and nailing together a box. Go for it. It's easier than you think and it will push you forward. ________________________________________________________ This new "Tools Craft" section is provided courtesy of Joel Moskowitz, founder of Tools for Working Wood , the Brooklyn-based catalog retailer of everything from hand tools to Festool; check out their online shop here . Joel also founded Gramercy Tools , the award-winning boutique manufacturer of hand tools made the old-fashioned way: Built to work and built to last.
Hackaday
7 months
Senior Moments Nobody you know. Source . Perhaps the most subtle and insidious age-related changes are the cognitive changes we all experience. It sort of creeps up on you is red-brown-brown 220 ohms or 2.2k? What was that part number again? But it adds up, and it can get to be a real burden. My dad, a life-long woodworker and cabinetmaker, started complaining about five years ago that he couldn't follow plans and instructions anymore. I'll be thrilled if I make it to 75 and still be as sharp as he was, but I know it's going to happen. Writing stuff down helps, as does engaging in any intellectually challenging activity. Our readers can and often do disagree that what we Hackaday writers accomplish counts as an intellectual pursuit, but as [Rud] points out, the challenges we get from reader comments are a great way to stay sharp. I always do additional research to limit the number of gotcha' comments.
Lincolnshire Echo
7 months
Core77
9 months
Core77
10 months
I bet you didn't know this: The biscuit joiner was invented under the influence of drugs! In the 1950s, Swiss cabinetmaker Hermann Steiner had started working with particle board, which was back then a newfangled material, and he was having problems joining it. During the busy Christmas season he caught a bad fever and his wife gave him some painkillers. While he was in bed with the sweats, he had a vision for perfectly opposing slots cut into two edges of particle board, joined by an oval-shaped piece of wood. "My wife thought I had visions due to the fever," Steiner wrote, "but I myself was entirely convinced of my idea." Steiner developed the concept into a workable machine, and his cabinetmaking shop was transformed into the producer of world-class wood-joining technologies today known as Lamello AG. At the Lamello booth at Holz-Handwerk , the machine on central display, the Zeta P2 , still resembles a biscuit joiner… …but it does something Steiner likely couldn't have imagined, high-powered meds or no.
Forbes
10 months
An Irish cabinetmaker will have quite the novelty on display at the Boston St. Patrick's Day Parade: a mobile pub equipped with an oak bar, a two-keg draught system, and heaps of too-cute-for-brogue charm. The starting price: $65,000.
Core77
10 months
Faber-Castell is a company with history. Not only were they the ones who came up with the idea of making pencils hexagonal, to make them less likely to roll off of a tabletop, but they've been around for more than two and a half centuries, having started up in Germany in 1761. Interestingly enough the company was started by a cabinetmaker, Kaspar Faber, who made his own pencils. His DIY pencils must've really kicked ass, because at some point he stopped making and selling cabinets to fulfill all of his pencil orders. By the 1880s the company was being run by the fourth generation of the family. Then-boss Lothar von Faber apparently had an eye for presentation, as you can see by this elaborate pencil case he had created as a retail display: Lothar von Faber always placed very high importance on an exclusive presentation of his quality products.
Core77
10 months
Before the internet, we had encyclopedias. One of the oldest is France's Encyclopédie from the 18th Century, where editors Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d'Alembert gamely tried to cram the world's knowledge into a comprehensive series of volumes. But the funny thing about French people is that they tend to write in French, so for years the University of Michigan has been translating this massive work into English and posting entries on their website as they become available. The 18th Century was a bit before the time of industrial designers, but we sifted through the Encyclopédie to find the closest related field and came up with furniture design. Within the Menuisier en meubles ("Art of the cabinetmaker") entry are some twenty plates cataloguing the various parts of fine furniture of the era. Detailed descriptions are nonexistent, but we get to see the components, the joinery, the templates, the weaving patterns of the wicker and even how some of the parts are meant to be cut from the timber: Plate I: Art of the Cabinet Maker, Seats Plate II: Art of the Cabinet Maker, Seats and Benches.
The Huffington Post
a year
The Gabriels are lifelong residents of the village located off the Hudson, two hours up from Manhattan and an hour below Albany; a middle class family that has been squeezed by the invasion of rich "weekenders." Dominating the discussion--at least in this first installment--is eldest son Thomas Gabriel, a prolific and well-known playwright who died of Parkinson's Disease four months ago. ( Hungry takes place on March 4, 2016--last night, literally, as I write this--following a memorial service at the Roosevelt Museum in nearby New Hyde Park.) Left alone in the family house is Mary (Maryann Plunkett), Peter's widow and a retired physician. She is joined by the two remaining Gabriel siblings, George (Jay O. Sanders), a still-local cabinetmaker, and Joyce (Amy Warren), an assistant costume designer living in Brooklyn. Also on hand is George's wife Hannah (Lynn Hawley), who works for a local caterer and who served at Chelsea's wedding--and if you don't know who Chelsea is, you're sitting around the wrong kitchen table.
The Huffington Post
a year
"Está todo chévere," he says when I call to ask about the cabinet that he's building for me. I know immediately what he means. We use the word chévere in Panama. It means "everything's cool." This prompts me to ask where he's from. The cabinetmaker laughs, "De Ecuador!" My American husband Daniel -- who lived in Chile for six months -- hears me down the hall. He calls out, "¡Macanudo!" which is another way of saying, "It's great. No sweat." I am white, middle-aged and thin. I dress in slim-cut jeans and wear clunky rectangular glasses, blending easily into the suburban backdrop where I live. After more than half a lifetime in the in the country I've chosen, I am more at ease in English than in my native Spanish. A Latina? A Hispanic? (Almost) no accent. Doesn't look the part. When I meet a Spanish-speaking person and say a word or two, "Hola. ¿Cómo está, señorita?" she will be surprised.
Dezeen
a year
The last chair designed by late Danish cabinetmaker Frits Henningsen has been put back into production by furniture company Carl Hansen & Søn . (more)
Freshome
a year
2. Cabriole Sofa Some say nothing symbolizes 18th-century furniture more than the cabriole leg. With the upper portion curving outward and the lower portion curving inward in a gentle S shape, this type of leg is associated with the Louis XV period of furniture design. The Cabriole sofa style is characterized by an exposed wooden frame (often carved), and slightly lower arms than the back. Other features include continuous lines and no back cushions; in the example above, though, the designer opted to add some, and we really like the result. 3. Camelback Sofa The camelback sofa style is attributed to London cabinetmaker and furniture designer Thomas Chippendale, whose name strongly influenced the English decor scene in the late 18th century. A true camelback sofa has an arched back that rises to a higher point in the middle, and again slightly at the ends.
BoingBoing
a year
Core77
a year
Shinobu Kobayashi is a Japanese woodworker based in Australia, currently studying Scandinavian techniques in Sweden. The three-continent background appears to have done him well; working in concert with a master cabinetmaker from Denmark, Kobayashi managed to cut this crazy three-way woodworking joint: According to Kobayashi, this "not popular Japanese joint" is called kawai tsugite and was invented by a Japanese professor at Tokyo University. I couldn't figure out how the darn thing works--but Matthias Wandel, who didn't even know what the joint was called, managed to figure it out only by watching the video above! Here he explains it, and reconstructs it: It's not surprising what happens at the end, but I think the joint is intended to be a mental/crafting exercise more than a practical technique.
The Huffington Post
a year
Have a good look around and research the integrated refrigerator options available and make sure your interior designer and cabinetmaker are on the same page, so it gets executed properly. It's worth mentioning that the range of fridges designed to be integrated is far more limited than the range of regular ones and, because they are generally designed to fit in shallower spaces, they may not be as big as other fridges. However, if you're looking for a polished and streamlined look, it'll be worth the small amount of space you'll sacrifice. Tip: If you're looking for a refrigerator that has a water or ice dispenser, don't forget the potential need to allow for running plumbing to the fridge. This is something that the plumber needs to know upfront. Contemporary Bedroom by Sydney Interior Designers & Decorators Arent&Pyke 2. Wallpaper. Wallpaper is awesome! There are so many interesting designs to choose from, and it's a wonderful way to make a freshly renovated room sing from the rafters.
Core77
a year
It is reported that Nanna Ditzel used to exclaim, "three steps forward and two back still means I've taken a step in the right direction!" This optimistic worldview helped propel an ambitious 60-year-long career that included furniture, textile, jewelry and product design. Nanna Ditzel reclining on her wicker lounge chair and footstool, designed in 1961 Dubbed the First Lady of Danish Furniture Design," Ditzel started her career as an apprentice cabinetmaker at the Richards School in Denmark before moving on to study furniture at the School of Arts and Crafts. In the furniture program she would meet her future husband and collaborator, Jørgen Ditzel, and together they began entering (and winning) design competitions and exhibitions while they were still students. Nanna graduated in 1946, and that same year she marriedrgen and they formally established their design studio together.
Make:
a year
TIME - Top Stories
a year
The Singer sewing machine was so revolutionary that even Mahatma Gandhi, who eschewed all other machines, made an exception for it. After learning to sew on a Singer in a British jail, Gandhi called it one of the few useful things ever invented. Many outside the prison population agreed. The Singer Company became one of Americas first multinational corporations, and a staggeringly successful one at that. At a time when the average American income totaled $500, Singer sewing machines were selling for $125 and they were selling . As TIME noted , by the time Isaac Singer died in 1875, his company was turning a profit of $22 million a year. Singer didnt invent the first sewing machine, but the one he patented on this day, Aug. 12, in 1851, was the most practical and the most commercially viable. Its success was a testament to Singers industrious spirit: hed worked variously as an actor, a ditch digger and a cabinetmaker before striking it rich in the sewing field.
Core77
2 years
Scott Hudson, Founder of Henrybuilt. When Scott Hudson founded Henrybuilt in 2001, he named the kitchen system company for his grandfather—a cabinetmaker, carpenter, stone mason and farmer. Carrying forward the tradition that Henry Spurgeon Hudson began on his own farm in rural North Carolina, Henrybuilt is dedicated to craft, functionality and quality embodied by a distinctly American company. "When Henry worked, there was no break between his head and his hand," Hudson recalls in the company's history. "He did his thinking with one as well as the other." Henrybuilt is the first American company to manufacture kitchen systems—a bespoke offering that is a unique combination of system engineering and holistic design solutions for the most important room in the house. With a new showroom now open in New York City, Hudson took a moment to chat with Core77 about the rise of the kitchen as a tool, the RD process for new Henrybuilt products, and why integrating technology into the cabinetry may not be the answer home cooks are looking for.