The Economist - United States
an hour
THE first full day of Donald Trump's presidency was marked by some vast protest marches in America and some pretty big ones elsewhere in the world. Demonstrating after an election is a strange thing to do: generally the most effective time to protest is when casting a ballot. The Americans who voted for Mr Trump will have seen the thronged streets and concluded that there are a lot of sore losers. But the “Women’s March on Washington”, organised by activists, did not feel like a protest against the result. It was more like an amble for civility. On the National Mall, where the day before people in red baseball caps had thronged to celebrate the inauguration of the 45th president, there was happy chaos. Nobody knew where they were going or minded too much whether they heard the various speakers arranged by the organisers. There was a fierce contest for the wittiest sign ("We shall overcomb", carried by Kate from Massachusetts was your blogger's favourite).
Sputnik International
16 hours
Sputnik International
16 hours
2016 has come and gone, but Russia has remained the number one bogeyman in the eyes of some of the most influential mainstream media resources in the world. Statistics compiled for the news agency Rossiya Segodnya news agency show which countries' print, radio and television media are most obsessed with casting Russia in a negative rightlight.
Politico
a day
Like he played a billionaire on TV, he also seemed to be in script as a president from central castingmarching through the political orders with a confident stride, attending to the ceremonial functions, and seeming happier than usual, though the trademark scowl often persisted. Trump showed up on time to church and sat through the service, flipping through the prayer book and mouthing along. Later, at the White House, the traditional tea between the outgoing and incoming presidents was cordial and friendly, by all accounts. His tweets were not incendiary; in fact, they weren't even written by him. The two families were seen laughing throughout the day, even though Michelle Obama looked less than happy after the speech that repudiated much of her husband's legacy. Trump called the Obamas magnificent and stood for a while on the steps of the Capitol, waving earnestly for their helicopter to leave.
BBC Two England
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Voice Of America
a day
Filmmaker Amir Bar-Lev said he was drawn to Amazon's global reach and ability to air the entirety of his four-hour film across six parts. "We showed this film to a number of people and everyone was excited, but the guys from Amazon really understood the film on a level I hadn't really experienced," Bar-Lev said. Netflix, with 94 million global subscribers, entered Sundance this year having already purchased six films and two documentary series, including sci-fi drama The Discovery, which will air March 31, and documentary Casting JonBenet, debuting in April. "We acquired films ahead of Sundance so that we could really showcase them at the festival," Sarandos said. He said the strategy was, in part, to capitalize on publicity at the festival. Netflix will release the films exclusively soon after their Sundance premieres. Studios vs streaming Amazon this year has offered filmmakers showcasing movies at Sundance bonuses of up to $100,000 for two-year distribution rights, with the first year exclusive to the platform, Variety reported this week.
Politico
a day
Deadline
a day
21stCenturyWire
a day
Variety
a day
“It’s really a thrill,” Annette Bening told Variety Thursday night on the red carpet of the 2017 CSA Artios Awards. “I remember when I didnt even know what a casting director was.” Now of course Bening, who was being honored with the Lynn Stalmaster Career Achievement Award, has a clear understanding of their role. The... Read more »
SPACE.com
a day
TIME - Top Stories
a day
Even while fighting for our rights, weve started taking our democracy for granted. Weve all grown up believing that our countrys basis could not be shaken, but we have been misled. The foundation upon which our country has been built is shaking now, and we, the people, are casting out for leaders, looking for change. But we need to look in the mirror. And whats more, we need to look at the faces of our fellow citizensour people of color, our Muslims, our LGBTQ communityand we need to acknowledge that no upper politicians failed them. We failed them. We failed ourselves. Clinton has been a strange, ill-fitting progressive hero since the beginning. She's never lied about being the full-fledged politician she is. Shes taken on all the guilt and shame of a nation, being attacked for her career, for her decision, for her gender.
Daily Express - Theatre
a day
Home Designing
a day
Den of Geek
2 days
Daily Mail - Entertainment
2 days
WinBeta
2 days
ITV
2 days
Those were the days. Footy favourite David Beckham will be casting himself away to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the popular BBC Radio 4 series Desert Island Discs on January 28th. The show hosted by Kirsty Young asks guests to choose eight tracks, a book and a luxury item they'd take with them if they were to be stranded on a desert island. The 75th celebration will kick off with a special three-hour programme showcasing some of the best moments from the series and extracts from recently rediscovered episodes.
Deadline
2 days
Informed Comment
2 days
By William deBuys | ( Tomdispatch.com ) Donald Trump was right. The election was rigged. What Trump got wrong (and, boy, does he get things wrong) is that the rigging worked in his favor. The manipulations took three monumental forms: Russian cyber-sabotage; FBI meddling; and systematic Republican efforts, especially in swing states, to prevent minority citizens from casting votes. The cumulative effect was more than sufficient to shift the outcome in Trumps favor and put the least qualified major-party candidate in the history of the republic into the White House. Trumpist internet trolls and Trump himself dismiss such concerns as sour grapes, but for anyone who takes seriously the importance of operating a democracy these assaults on the nations core political process constitute threats to the countrys very being.
The Huffington Post
2 days
George: Suspend disbelief. Truly profound. On that note, what key lessons and vantage points have helped you successfully carry out this role? Kim: I think there are a few things that I've learned. Success is fleeting, and failure is not permanent. Being conscious of the fact that all the great things that were done yesterday in my mind are fleeting, and it's really important to constantly be focused on new ways to do things; new ways to change. I approach every day and everything that I do in this way, and I think that this is core to the way Capgemini is wired as well. I scan the market and consider what will impact the business start to imagine a new future. There's a term that we use which is really focusing on 'future casting' the business that we drive. Future casting and future proofing ourselves as individuals so that when the next wave of change comes, we're really ready to accelerate and go around the corner with the gas on the pedal and not on the brake.
TIME - Global Spin
2 days
South China Morning Post
2 days
Ruptly TV
2 days
Around 150 people gathered outside the old Coronet building in London's Notting Hill, Thursday, to protest against the casting of four Caucasian actors in the roles of four East Asian characters in The Print Room's production of Howard Barker's 'In The Depths of Deep Love.' SOT, Mei Mac, actor (English): "For a cast of entirely Caucasian actors to tell a story that is set in China , that is yellowfacing, you’re putting yourself in the shoes of someone that ought to have been east Asian and that is yellowfacing 100%." SOT, Louise Mai Newbury (English): "The play is going on, the play is going on, in one sense they have got away with it and that’s what’s really awful, that in this day and age, it’s 2017 that they can do this and think it’s alright." SOT, Daniel York (English): "It has been a thing in Britain I think, that theatre is kind of the preserve of a certain kind of middle class, privileged white Caucasian elite and they’ve tended to kind of dominate theatre a bit and I’m not too sure some of them want to give up that privilege too easily, this is what it’s about.