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Coventry Telegraph
2 days
Sputnik International
2 days
The Spanish Air Force will join the mission to patrol the skies over the Baltic States amid the deterioration of ties between NATO and Russia, according to the Spanish newspaper ABC.
Bleacher Report
4 days
Manchester City are one of the few clubs who could feasibly afford to expedite his exit from Signal Iduna Park, but even with their dominion over Germany's Bundesliga , there's one team who won't be in the race for Aubameyang : The Gabon talisman has scored 20 goals in 22 appearances across all competitions this season, including a record of 16 goals in 15 Bundesliga outings, making him the leading scorer in Germany's first tier this term. Manchester City have only recently added to their attacking ranks after Gabriel Jesus made his January arrival from Palmeiras , although the Champions League Twitter account noted Aubameyang is already proven in Europe's elite: One Etihad Stadium departure who could easily help make way for Aubameyang is Aguero , and Duncan Castles reported for Yahoo that City were "prepared to listen to offers" for the Argentinian following a meeting with Guardiola .
The Week
5 days
At first, the idea was to build castles along every Roman mile, with two turrets in between each. "At some point after the first few years of building, they decided they would go and build forts on the wall," Frances McIntosh, curator of Roman Collections for English Heritage, told the Evening Chronicle in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. "Under the wall, you can see the line where the turrets were being built. That's how we know the decision was changed. We do not know how, why or when, but it’s after a couple of years - at least - of the building." When was it built? McIntosh estimates the work began around the year 122AD, when Hadrian visited Britain, and was completed by 138AD. The Romans had left - officially - by 410AD, but many stayed and probably lived in the forts along the wall. "Most officers were recalled but some soldiers just stayed there. They might have formed militias and lived in a farming economy on the wall, living in forts," she said.
DW
5 days
DW
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The #DailyDrone flies above the 2000 year old town in the heart of the Allgäu Region. http://www.facebook.com/dw.reise http://twitter.com/TravelDW http://www.instagram.com/dw_euromaxx #DailyDrone is our daily bird's-eye view of Germany. Every day a different exciting location in the viewfinder of our drone camera. Famous sights in Berlin, Cologne, Hamburg or Munich, castles and fortresses from across the country, loading containers in a major port, bringing in the harvest, a day at the regatta. #DailyDrone takes you on unique journeys to destinations all over Germany, in all weathers and seasons, 365 days a year.
The Guardian
5 days
BBC children’s programme announces its famous badges awarded since 1963 will be made from recycled materials For decades, Blue Peter presenters have encouraged children to use toilet rolls and other household refuse to recreate the ThunderbirdsTracy Island and fantasy castles. Now the BBC has announced it will be making the show’s famous badges from recycled yoghurt pots. The announcement is part of an effort to make the BBC children’s programme more green: the badges will be made in a solar-powered factory using materials that were made earlier – in this case, yoghurt pots. Related: Blue Peter: behind the scenes Continue reading...
DW
6 days
It's a little too cold for a swim, but even in winter it's worth a visit. The #Dailydrone at Lake Müritz. http://www.facebook.com/dw.reise http://twitter.com/TravelDW http://www.instagram.com/dw_euromaxx #DailyDrone is our daily bird's-eye view of Germany. Every day a different exciting location in the viewfinder of our drone camera. Famous sights in Berlin, Cologne, Hamburg or Munich, castles and fortresses from across the country, loading containers in a major port, bringing in the harvest, a day at the regatta. #DailyDrone takes you on unique journeys to destinations all over Germany, in all weathers and seasons, 365 days a year.
Dover Express
6 days
Kent has a long list of famous and beautiful castles rich in history and architecture.The historic sites range from Norman and medieval ruins to grand and spectacular estates surrounded by moats and stunning gardens.Families can enjoy days out in all weathers at the castles, from exploring the interior, strolling around the gardens, and learning more about the history through re-enactments.We have compiled a list of 15 spectacular castles you can visit in the county- so you know exactly where to...
DW
6 days
I4U News
6 days
Everybody has heard of the myth of bloodthirsty vampires that haunted castles and went after humans at night-time. In real life, vampire bats however probably do not suck human blood.Yet the latest...
Apartment Therapy
7 days
Canopy beds aren't exactly a new concept. Back in the days of drafty castles, they provided extra warmth when heavy curtains were hung on them (which also added some privacy since there were always other people around). But iNyx, complete with 21st century bells and whistles, is not your monarch's canopy bed. READ MORE »
Dover Express
7 days
DW
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TechCrunch
8 days
The Economist - Business
8 days
IF THERE is a consensus right now in American politics, it must be that infrastructure spending is a good thing. It employs workers, improves economic efficiency and, at the moment, can be financed at rock-bottom bond yields. So why dont governments get on with it? The problem is multi-faceted. Although people tend to be enthusiastic about infrastructure in general, they are more critical of specific projects. If they are in the country, then they ruin the currency; if they are in the town, then they ruin neighbourhoods or impinge on private-property rights. When it comes to public infrastructure projects, the benefits are long term but the costs are short term. The politician that authorises the project is rarely the same one that opens it. So an elected leader gets all the flak from those who oppose this white elephant/blot on the landscape but none of the praise for the reduced traffic jams or cheaper power that ensue.
The Economist - Business
8 days
IF THERE is a consensus at the moment, it must be that infrastructure spending is a good thing. It employs workers, improves economic efficiency and, at the moment, can be financed at rock-bottom bond yields. So why dont governments get on with it? The problem is multi-faceted. While people tend to be enthusiastic about infrastructure in general, they are more critical of specific projects. If they are in the country, then they ruin the currency; if they are in the town, then they ruin neighbourhoods or impinge on private property rights. When it comes to public infrastructure projects, the benefits are long-term but the costs are short-term. The politician that authorises the project is rarely the same one that opens it. So an elected leader gets all the flak from those who oppose this white elephant/blot on the landscape but none of the praise for the reduced traffic jams or cheaper power that ensue.
DW
8 days
Dover Express
8 days
Kent is home to some great tourist attractions, including stunning castles, beautiful gardens and cathedrals. But some of the county's sites of interest are perhaps less well known to people who don't live in the area. Here's our list of nine places and attractions in Kent you have probably never heard of - but they may be worth a visit. Grain Tower This is a 19th century gun tower located off the Isle of Grain in the mouth of the River Medway. It was built to protect dockyards at...
Derby Telegraph
12 days
Getting married? Excited? Wondering which venue to choose to tie the knot? Well, get your thinking caps on because you have around 150 licensed venues to choose from in Derbyshire - and we have listed every single one of them here.Finding the perfect location for your wedding takes time and is the key decision every couple has to make once they decide to marry.Castles, National Trust properties, elegant privately owned venues, register offices, farms and numerous hotels, both in the city and...
Daily Mail - Home
12 days
Henry VIII would spent£6million a year on 600,000 gallons of beer and £3.5million on meats such as mutton, ox and venison, for his banquets - more than double the current Queen's food bill.
DW
12 days