TIME - Top Stories
3 hours
MOSCOW (AP) Twenty-four hours before Donald Trump was to be sworn in as president of the United States, several dozen people packed a Moscow nightclub to get a head start on celebrating. Trump, Trump it is unbelievable. Trump, Trump, he's a superman, Trump, Trump symbol of America. Trump, Trump, he's really president, the Thursday evening crowd at Arbat 13 heard an 82-year-old, Soviet-born crooner sing in English. The small jazz club located a stone's throw from the Stalin-era tower housing Russia's foreign ministry might have been early, but it isn't the only place in the capital that Ronald Reagan associated with an evil empire to be toasting Trump. Across from the U.S. embassy compound in central Moscow, the Russian Army store put up a poster with the incoming president's picture to advertise inauguration day discounts of 10 percent for embassy employees and American citizens.
Daily Mail - Home
5 hours
RT America
6 hours
Breitbart News
8 hours
ROMA, Texas -- Four family members who ran one of the largest cartel smuggling operations in south Texas had their life in prison sentences commuted and will likely be returning to this border city from where they ran their criminal empire. One of the main destinations that the criminal organizations delivered drugs to was Chicago, Illinois.
Politico
8 hours
All that has prompted widespread speculation that Ivanka may fulfill some of the first lady’s traditional duties in Melania’s place. She pushed back on that in her interview with ABC, though. She also discussed her transition from leader at the Trump Organization to Washington, describing it as “emotional.” “It’s emotional that I’m stepping away from my business, and my father will be president, and hopefully I can be there to support him and to support those causes I’ve cared about my whole professional career,” she said. ABC also spoke with Trump’s two adult sons, Don Jr. and Eric, for the segment. Both sons are taking over managerial control of their father’s business empire, an arrangement that has not satisfied ethics experts, who say it does not eliminate Trump’s many financial conflicts of interest. Eric, though, suggested that his father will be too busy to get involved with the business as president.
Voice Of America
9 hours
Donald Trump is preparing to take executive actions on his first day in the White House on Friday to roll back policies of outgoing President Barack Obama and implement parts of his plans to crack down on immigration and build a wall on the U.S.-Mexican border. Trump, a Republican who was elected on Nov. 8 and will be sworn in during a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Friday, is poised to wield one of the most powerful tools of his office, the presidential pen, for executive actions that can be implemented without the input of Congress. "He is committed to not just Day 1, but Day 2, Day 3 of enacting an agenda of real change, and I think that you're going to see that in the days and weeks to come," Trump spokesman Sean Spicer said Thursday, telling reporters to expect activity Friday, during the weekend and early next week. The top items on the agenda for Trump, who has presided over a sprawling business empire but has never before held public office, mirror the populist pledges that fueled his election victory: immigration curbs and job creation, particularly in the manufacturing sector, Spicer said.
Mondoweiss
9 hours
Washington Free Beacon
12 hours
It found companies in which entities controlled by Khamenei have a large or majority stake, including those that are part of the economic empire of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), have struck at least nine foreign deals worth more than $11 billion in the last 18 months. Setad said in a statement to Reuters that Iran's private sector is reluctant to make large and long-term investments. Setad and groups like it create a favorable atmosphere for investment, private-sector development, and the downsizing of the government, it said. The IRGC declined to comment. The state dominates Iran's economy, so state-controlled firms were always likely to win most business after sanctions were lifted. Iranian officials estimate that the private sector makes up only 20 percent of Iran's economy. In Iran, you make money if you're close to the centers of power, said Ali Ansari, an Iran scholar at the University of St.
The Huffington Post
13 hours
When I was in elementary, middle, and high school, my history teachers helped me gain a better understanding of how the past created the contemporary world we lived in. We memorized great figures in world history, got inundated with key dates that shaped societies, and familiarized ourselves with empires of past eras. But that approach prevented my classmates from understanding how the past informed the future. Sure, we knew about the Mayan Empire or King Tut, or remembered the date of the Emancipation Proclamation, but we were clueless about how all of this connected to the world we lived in, and how history is really a continuum (and not fragmented). This wasn't just limited to history, as civics, government, geography, and other social studies classes faced similar challenges in empowering students to think forward. Moreover, social studies education today continues to be hindered by the question, "What are we doing to get our students prepared for tomorrow?" My friend Craig Perrier's piece on 21st century social studies education hits the nail on the head when it comes to how social studies teachers should approach the profession.
Al Jazeera
13 hours
When Barack Obama became president, the United States was a wounded nation. His predecessor, George Bush, had taken the country to war against Iraq on false pretenses, the US was still fighting in Afghanistan and Osama bin Laden remained at large. But Obama came to power promising hope, a change from the status quo and an end to wars. He started on an unbelievable high, that sang out all around the world. He had promised to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay, get out of Iraq, win the war in Afghanistan, reset relations with Moscow, improve relations with the Muslim world, and to finally, solve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. There were successes, but they seemed to be overshadowed by the failures, and what he leaves is a polarised nation, split politically, economically and ideologically. And then there is Donald Trump. Like Obama, he was elected because people were desperate for change.
Washington Free Beacon
13 hours
It found companies in which entities controlled by Khamenei have a large or majority stake, including those that are part of the economic empire of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), have struck at least nine foreign deals worth more than $11 billion in the last 18 months. Setad said in a statement to Reuters that Iran's private sector is reluctant to make large and long-term investments. Setad and groups like it create a favorable atmosphere for investment, private-sector development, and the downsizing of the government, it said. The IRGC declined to comment. The state dominates Iran's economy, so state-controlled firms were always likely to win most business after sanctions were lifted. Iranian officials estimate that the private sector makes up only 20 percent of Iran's economy. In Iran, you make money if you're close to the centers of power, said Ali Ansari, an Iran scholar at the University of St.
Liverpool Echo
13 hours
Coventry Telegraph
14 hours
Band will perform at the Far Gosford Street venue as part of their forthcoming UK tour
Vanity Fair
16 hours
BBC Parliament
16 hours
It is inevitable and none of us as responsible legislators also working in a democracy can sit back and watch those events unfold and sit on our hands. We can do more. The legacy of empire demands we do more. We have a duty to speak out more regularly and challenge and encourage both the Indian and the Pakistani authorities, I have to say to the minister, the written answers to the questions that have been tabled, particularly last summer, are so bland it is as if these matters are something that is just a daily occurrence that can be ignored.
BBC Parliament
16 hours
What Kashmiris say to me, particularly in Nottingham and across the country, it is almost there is a sense in which there needs to be a much greater urgency from everyone to actually tackle this problem. It has been going on for decades and people worry about that in ten years, 20, 30, people will stubbly discussing the same issue. That is why I begin with this point about intractability because the other reason it is not good enough to adopt the current position is that it is a legacy of the British Empire and we should acknowledge our historic responsibility.
Radar Online
16 hours
They looked at me like I was crazy! he says. In yet another Magnum oddity, co-star John Hillerman, now 84, played British-accented butler Higgins — despite the fact he was born and raised deep in the heart of Texas! John honed his accent listening to English star Laurence Olivier , and his accent became so perfect that a British lord once wrote to him and told him, You are a credit to the Empire! John had struggled for years to be a successful actor — until he landed Magnum when he was a ripe old 47! PHOTOS: Barbies, Makeup & Tights: 10 Sex Change Secrets From Richard SimmonsChildhood I lived in a cold-water, walk-up flat on New York's Lower East Side, he says. There were many months I didn't have the rent. It was a miserable existence. Once he landed in Hawaii and started getting a regular, and hefty, paycheck, that all changed.
The Week
17 hours
Den of Geek
19 hours
Our Kong is by far the biggest Kong that you’ve seen on screen, and that translates to a lot of different things on the island.” How big, you may or may not ask? Vogt-Roberts insists that Skull Island 's Kong is the biggest in the history of cinema. While Peter Jackson's Kong was on the smaller side around 25 feet and the original Kong varied in size from 25 to 50 feet, depending on whether or not he was hanging off the Empire State Building, Skull Island's Kong is bigger than both of them. Why the size change? Vogt-Roberts says that "the thing that most interested me was, how big do you need to make [Kong], so that when someone lands on this island and doesnt believe in the idea of myth, the idea of wonder – when we live in a world of social and civil unrest, and everything is crumbling around us, and technology and facts are taking over – how big does this creature need to be, so that when you stand on the ground and you look up at it, the only thing that can go through your mind is: ‘That’s a god.
South China Morning Post
19 hours
Den of Geek
a day
Here's the teaser clip, followed by the featurette that broke the news... And here's a poster... Looks like Saw Gerrera is coming to #StarWarsRebels soon! @CoffeeWthKenobi #RogueOne pic.twitter.com/MMYcwr2TN5Rebels Reactions (@RebelsReactions) December 17, 2016 And Disney XD's press team sent us this picture... Saw Gerrera is a rebel insurgent who is sometimes termed a terrorist due to the extreme nature of his acts against the Empire. He was created by George Lucas for his never-actually-made live action TV series Underworld. He eventually showed up on screen in season 5 of The Clone Wars, where he was voiced by Andrew Kishino. And most of you will know by now that Forest Whitaker made his debut as Saw Gerrera in Rogue One. Since the current stories of Rebels take place some time before Rogue One, perhaps we'll see here how Saw ended up running his resistance on Jedha, and why he needed to get robot legs at some point after appearing in The Clone Wars.
South China Morning Post
a day
Liverpool Echo
a day
South China Morning Post
a day