Sky News
6 minutes
A North Korean airline employee has also been called for questioning. The Lloyds Banking Group has posted an annual pre-tax profit of £4.24 billion, more than double the £1.64 billion reported for 2015. The bank's chief executive's pay is down from last year to £5.5 million due to its poor share price performance. Teachers and police officers are being urged to look out for the "soft signs" that a child is experiencing abuse or neglect.
ABC News - Australia
16 minutes
BBC News 24
16 minutes
And in a few minutes we'll speak to Mike Penrose the executive director of Unicef UK about the situation in Sudan. A convicted murderer is on the run this morning after armed men helped him escape during a hospital visit.
South China Morning Post
26 minutes
ABC News - South Australia
an hour
The Sun Daily
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KyivPost
an hour
Sky News
an hour
Some other very brief figures to bring you on these numbers are that Lloyds is paying about 2.6 billion in £ dividends, and the taxpayer gets four per cent stake in that true the Treasury's holding. In terms of bonuses, Lloyds is paying out over £390 million in bonuses to staff. The chief executive, his pay package is £5.5 million, including a bonus of £1.
The Economic Times
an hour
Bloomberg
an hour
BBC News - Business
an hour
Airbus's chief executive says it delivered on commitments, apart from problems with the A400M plane.
The Iran Project
an hour
Recent media reports have said that the U.S. Navy may be looking to conduct a fresh operation soon. Experts say the freedom of navigation operations, or FONOPs, in the South China are unlikely to be rolled back under new U.S. President Donald Trump. “The FONOPS were set out in the Obama administration,” said Brad Glosserman, executive director of the Pacific Forum CSIS. “Of course the Trump team had to approve them to go ahead once it got in office, but I dont see a disconnect in policy between the two administrations on this issue.” Beijing, on the other hand, has in recent comments touted its efforts to work with other nations and multilateral groupings, including the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, on South China Sea issue. “Thanks to the concerted efforts by China and ASEAN countries, the situation in the South China Sea is easing up toward stability and moving in a positive direction,” Geng said Tuesday.
CNN
2 hours
President Donald Trump is preparing to seize on a second chance to make a first impression with the release this week of a new executive order temporarily halting travel from citizens of seven nations he says pose a high risk of terrorism.
Sky News
2 hours
Eric Solomon, the executive director of this UN agency. They're all here, and they will be discussing how to reduce Marine litter. Now, they expect pledges either to ban it or reduce it considerably.
Informed Comment
2 hours
The Iran Project
2 hours
SABC Digital News
2 hours
One of the growing sectors of the South African economy is small business and entrepreneurship. However the big concern is that this growth is not gaining scale or making an impact on economic growth. So how can we ensure that all these new ideas and programs we talk about constantly start to create jobs and make a meaningful contribution to the country's coffers. Xolani Qubeka is the Chief Executive Officer of the Small Business Development Institute, which is also a member of the Black Business Council. For more news, visit: http://www.sabc.co.za/news
Voice Of America
2 hours
Both husband and wife are committed Republicans who believe that Democrats have pursued a losing strategy. “You can’t keep taxing the rich because eventually, they aint going to want to pay,” says Richard. “What are they doing again? Oh yeah, moving away.” Offshore competition worries their son, Tristan, an account executive with the family company and part-time student in business communication at Arizona State University. At 23, he is the oldest of the family's three children. Calling himself a political moderate, Tristan says he was impressed with Democrat Bernie Sanders, who lost his party’s nomination to Hillary Clinton. So far, he’s not impressed with Donald Trump. The main issue for him? “Definitely jobs coming back,” he says, “but jobs not in old industries that we’re not really expanding in any more. I know that China is doing a lot of big things with solar energy.
Voice Of America
2 hours
South China Morning Post
3 hours
Informed Comment
3 hours
By Danny Sjursen | (Tomdispatch.com) | The United States has already lost its war for the Middle East, that is. Having taken my own crack at combat soldiering in both Iraq and Afghanistan, that couldnt be clearer to me. Unfortunately, its evidently still not clear in Washington. Bushs neo-imperial triumphalism failed. Obamas quiet shift to drones, Special Forces, and clandestine executive actions didnt turn the tide either. For all President Trumps bluster, boasting, and threats, rest assured that, at best, hell barely move the needle and, at worst but why even go there? At this point, its at least reasonable to look back and ask yet again: Why the failure? Explanations abound, of course. Perhaps Americans were simply never tough enough and still need to take off the kid gloves.
BBC News 24
3 hours
A political as well as an economic necessity as far as Donald Trump is concerned, I suppose. What do you say? I can't comment on what the president's political motivations are for undertaking these steps, but it is definitely keeping a campaign promise and keeping with the executive orders he issued earlier, in the sense that it's a dramatic crackdown and a signal I think to the rise of mass deportation and detention of immigrants in this country.
France 24
3 hours
Former Hong Kong leader Donald Tsang was sentenced to 20 months in prison on Wednesday after a high-profile corruption trial found him guilty of misconduct during his time at the helm of the city. Tsang, 72, who held the leadership post of chief executive for seven years from 2005, is the most senior city official ever to be convicted in a criminal trial and the highest ranking one to be put behind bars. The six-week trial at the High Court came as residents lose faith in Hong Kong's leaders after a string of corruption cases fuel suspicions over links between public officials and business figures. Tsang was found guilty on Friday of failing to disclose his plans to lease a luxury flat from a major investor in a broadcaster, which was later granted a licence from the government while he was leader. "Never in my judicial career have I seen a man fallen from so high," judge Andrew Chan said in delivering the sentence.
SiteProNews
3 hours