The Iran Project
3 minutes
And the biggest protest, set for Saturday, could be history-making. That's when the Women's March on Washington is expected to draw 200,000 protesters to the streets of D.C., a number that Inaugural Historian Jim Bendat said could break records. It's quite noteworthy. If they get those kinds of numbers, it will far exceed any previous inaugural protest, he said. Overall, the National Park Service has approved 22 permits for First Amendment events ranging in size from 50 to 200,000 people for inauguration week. Though many protest organizers state outright they have no plans to break laws or create altercations, city and federal law enforcement agencies have been working together in preparation for every security concern. D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has said more than 3,000 police officers from other regions and 5,000 National Guardsmen will be on-hand to help secure the parade route.
BBC News 24
3 minutes
The US Federal Trade Commission said Uber offered false promises about how much drivers would earn and how much they would have to pay to finance a car. The agreement covers statements Uber made from late 2013 until 2015 while trying to recruit more drivers to expand its service and remain ahead of its main rival, Lyft. A quick look at the market some of that is slightly down.
MacRumors
7 minutes
The Federal Trade Commission recently filed a complaint against popular ride-hailing app Uber for posting inflated yearly wages on various job-seeking websites, which "enticed numerous consumers to become Uber drivers" under false pretenses, according to the FTC. Uber isn't fighting the allegations placed against it, and has instead this week quickly agreed to a settlement deal in the way of paying 20 million as equitable relief to the FTC. As reported by BuzzFeed News , the FTC's complaint explains that from May 2014 through August 2015 Uber published a statement on its website which included various annual earning rates for its drivers. In the post the company mentioned that for UberX drivers the "median income is more than 90,000/year/driver in New York and more than 74,000/year/driver in San Francisco." According to the FTC, the truth is that the median income is 29,000 less than Uber claimed in New York, and 21,000 less in San Francisco, specifically when looking at hours locked to a standard 40-hour work week.
CNN
16 minutes
BBC News 24
34 minutes
But what about the key policy that defined the Obama years? The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare as it became known. Well, it is becoming more expensive for federal government and Congress has already begun to repeal it, but what will replace it? Certainly they are going to look at more competition among insurance companies, and for those who can't afford it perhaps subsidies will be replaced with tax credits.
Breitbart News
an hour
When elected federal legislators announce that they are boycotting the official swearing-in of the new president, they are not protesting the person that was elected, they are protesting America itself.
KyivPost
an hour
BBC News 24
an hour
But what about the key policy that defined the Obama years? The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare as it became known. Well, it is becoming more expensive for federal government and Congress has already begun to repeal it, but what will replace it? Certainly they are going to look at more competition among insurance companies and for those who can't afford it perhaps subsidies will be replaced with tax credits.
Ars Technica UK
an hour
Enlarge (credit: GHETTO UBER DRIVER ) On Thursday, Uber agreed to pay $20 million to end a lawsuit filed by the Federal Trade Commission, which alleged the startup had exaggerated what drivers could expect to earn in various cities nationwide. In the civil complaint , which was filed with a federal court in San Francisco just before the settlement was announced, the FTC noted that Uber had advertised on Craigslist in numerous cities that drivers could make $16 to $29 per hour. However, in some cities, including Boston, Minneapolis, and Philadelphia, only less than 10 percent of drivers actually averaged the advertised rate. On Twitter, the FTC said that the money would go to affected drivers . The FTC also alleged that Uber's “Vehicle Solutions Program,” which aided financing of vehicles, ended up costing far more than drivers had initially been told that they would. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Radar Online
2 hours
He also f iled against her ex-boyfriend Brooks Ayers , alleging breach of contract, among other accusations. However in 2015, a federal court judge dismissed the fraud lawsuit and ordered Williamson to pay back Ayers $132,641 in legal fees. Ayers then transferred the rights to that judgment to Gunvalson. Now it’s up to the 54-year-old RHOC star to fight for what she wants! How long do you think it will take to get her money back? Reply in the comments below. We pay for juicy info! Do you have a story for RadarOnline.com? Email us at tips@radaronline.com, or call us at 800-344-9598 any time, day or night.
The Star Online
2 hours
KyivPost
2 hours
Politico
2 hours
It’s time for Episode 38 of the Nerdcast, POLITICO’s podcast on the White House and politics. Tune in each week to geek out with us as we dive deep into the political landscape, the latest numbers that matter, plus backstage dope on how politics really works. We’re the people who spend Friday nights poring over poll numbers or the latest Federal Election Commission reports — so if you want to understand how the modern politics game is played, this is the podcast for you. ( Subscribe to the Nerdcast on iTunes) POLITICO reporters discuss expected themes of Donald Trump's inaugural address, the lack of under-secretaries named at the Defense and State departments, and Trump's favorability numbers.
KyivPost
2 hours
WhoWhatWhy
2 hours
We try to ensure that these transcripts do not include errors. However, due to a constraint of resources, we are not always able to proofread them as closely as we would like and hope that you will excuse any errors that slipped through. Jeff Schechtman: Welcome to Radio WhoWhatWhy. I’m Jeff Schechtman. Amidst all the political rhetoric of the past 18 months, a couple of things are clear. One is that the nature of work is changing; that technology, AI and robotics will play a larger and larger role, that globalization even in spite of the populist infection that’s broken out, is here to stay and that to deal with all of this, education of the next generations is going to be ground zero. It’s beyond troubling then, that Donald Trump appointment to lead the Department of Education, someone who seems to know nothing about the past, present or future of federal education policy.
KyivPost
2 hours
The Huffington Post
2 hours
The same was true in the 1960s, when liberals were celebrating their "permanent majority" and conservatives were fighting not just for the future of the Republican Party but the future of conservatism. This yin and yang of liberalism and conservatism is just another derivative of the federalist vs. anti-federalist argument that dominated the Federal Convention in 1787 and has continued under various labels and parties ever since. America needs this dualism. It is a vaccine against the dangerous extremes of democracy. Liberals should celebrate their contributions not bemoan their fate - for Americans need to be reminded of what liberalism has given them. In the last half century, the liberal agenda expanded the franchise to eighteen-year-olds and abolished the poll tax. It began the removal of discrimination against blacks with the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968.
The Guardian - Environment
2 hours
Ars Technica
2 hours
Enlarge (credit: GHETTO UBER DRIVER ) On Thursday, Uber agreed to pay $20 million to end a lawsuit filed by the Federal Trade Commission, which alleged the startup had exaggerated what drivers could expect to earn in various cities nationwide. In the civil complaint , which was filed with a federal court in San Francisco just before the settlement was announced, the FTC noted that Uber had advertised on Craigslist in numerous cities that drivers could make $16 to $29 per hour. However, in some cities, including Boston, Minneapolis, and Philadelphia, only less than 10 percent of drivers actually averaged the advertised rate. On Twitter, the FTC said that the money would go to affected drivers . The FTC also alleged that Uber's “Vehicle Solutions Program,” which aided financing of vehicles, ended up costing far more than drivers had initially been told that they would. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments
ABC News - United States
2 hours
NewsMax
2 hours
Global News
2 hours
Sky News
2 hours
Giving you the depth of what happened. I know that we are looking at protest, but what happened at the election? The election of the president, the House, soon, taken over by Republicans. federal justice officers.
CNN
3 hours