Derby Telegraph
2 minutes
Darren Bent joined Derby County on a two-year deal in the summer of 2015. That is due to expire at the end of this season. The striker's contract includes the option of a further 12 months, though there has been no announcement regarding his future made by the Rams as yet. Bent has scored 12 goals so far this term - only one behind leading marksman Tom Ince. However, at 33, the former England international is in the twilight of his illustrious career. Would you like to see him spend another...
France 24
4 minutes
Doing so would bring the group up to the technological level of rival Al-Qaeda's Yemen branch Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), where so-called expert bombmaker Ibrahim al-Asiri has spent years on a similar effort. Airport security is much better than just a few years ago, Jay Ahern, the former acting director of the US Customs and Border Control, told AFP. "But clearly terror organizations continue to target air travel, and they have shown a clear ability to innovate," Ahern said. - 'Innovative' AQAP bombmaker - Recent attacks on aircraft in Somalia and Egypt are evidence of a focus by jihadist groups on developing harder-to-detect bombs -- and getting them on flights. The bomb that blew a hole in the fuselage of a Somalian airline in February 2016, killing one person, is believed to have been built into a laptop computer carried into the passenger cabin.
Daily Mail - Health
5 minutes
BBC News 24
9 minutes
is low-grade attacks with knives, blunt weapons, cars and lorries and that is where we need to invest our money. As a former counterterrorism officer, for you, what security flaws have been exposed as a result of the attack? I would not.
BBC News 24
14 minutes
jam-packed, because commuters, tourists and the like are trying to find their way around London roads because so many in the heart of the city are shut. We will now speak to a former counterterrorism detective who was part.
Daily Star - Football
15 minutes
Japan Times
15 minutes
The Hill
16 minutes
Ashford Herald
24 minutes
A man who held his ex-girlfriend prisoner for six hours and repeatedly assaulted her at a flat in Margate has been jailed for three years and one month.Jak Barrow, 24, of no fixed address, refused to let his former partner leave during an ordeal in which he kicked, punched and bit her, dragged her by her hair and held a knife to her throat. The incident happened in Trinity Square between 10.30pm on Wednesday, September 28 2016 and 4.30am the following day.Read more: A parent has been jailed...
Coventry Telegraph
28 minutes
Sky News
29 minutes
Ashford Herald
31 minutes
A man who held his ex-girlfriend prisoner for six hours and repeatedly assaulted her at a flat in Margate has been jailed for three years and one month.Jak Barrow, 24, of no fixed address, refused to let his former partner leave during an ordeal in which he kicked, punched and bit her, dragged her by her hair and held a knife to her throat. The incident happened in Trinity Square between 10.30pm on Wednesday, September 28 2016 and 4.30am the following day.Read more: A parent has been jailed...
ABC News - International
33 minutes
Agence France-Presse says its former photographer released in Bahrain after being held for more than 24 hours
Daily Express - Life
38 minutes
ON THE golf course he was known for his calm, steady precision – a style of play that saw him win a record eight European Tour Order of Merit titles and 31 European Tour events, more than any other British player.
Watford Observer
41 minutes
The Foreign Office Minister has been hailed a “hero MP” after trying to save the life of the police officer killed in the Westminster terror attack.
Daily Mail - Home
42 minutes
Bill Clinton will pay his respects to the Sinn Fein politician in Londonderry. But Mrs May will not attend the funeral nor will Mr Blair, according to sources close to the former Prime Minister.
Daily Mail - Home
an hour
Yorkshire Post - Sports
an hour
BBC News 24
an hour
Former national counter terrorist adviser Lee Dodderidge is with me. What would you want to hear from your elected representatives this morning?.
Politico
an hour
My conclusion from the data we have is that the marketplace was poised for greater success, said Aviva Aron-Dine, who served as senior counselor to the HHS secretary until January 2017, before moving to the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities. The Trump administration also proposed new rules last month that would tighten up the health law’s special enrollment periods and change certain plans' “actuarial value” — essentially, the share of total costs that the insurer pays — which can push more costs onto patients. The White House maintains that those are necessary steps to shore up a mess that they inherited, by limiting who's signing up for coverage and allowing insurers to sell cheaper plans. Insurers had been pushing for those changes in order to stay in the market. Some former Obama officials say that the changes, particularly extra verification requirements for people who sign up outside the usual enrollment season, may backfire and actually drive health plan customers away.
Politico
an hour
“It changes the partnership. It presents a huge risk and cost shift to states.” But Republican critics of Medicaid, including HHS Secretary Tom Price, say it is a flawed program and pouring more money in wont fix it. They call for a fresh approach that empowers states to innovate. Both Price and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma have promised to give states that freedom. The danger, Solomon says, is that states could introduce policies, such as imposing work rules or larger out-of-pocket costs, which would weaken the safety net and erode the entitlement. “You can do other things that basically cause people to lose coverage,” she said. Some conservative analysts, like Chris Jacobs, a former Senate aide who writes on health policy, wants the House bill to go further on entitlement reform. He’d like the bill changed to make block grants more attractive to states than the other capped payments because they’re more flexible.
BBC News 24
an hour
this divide us in any way. In fact, let's be the London that we are. We stand together. We will not be defeated, because if we are we are feeding right into the hands of those who want to divide us. Which is an echo of what the Prime Minister Theresa May said. Lee. Average, a former national security adviser. This attack.
Politico
an hour
Last December, the group issued a detailed memo of its policy asks — including blocking Yucca — that noted Trump’s history as a former casino owner who “understands many of the issues facing the industry.” On Monday, the group’s government relations vice president, Whit Askew, wrote in an email to POLITICO that despite the Yucca line item in the budget proposal his organization “has been encouraged by the administration’s pro-business tone to promote jobs, growth and reinvestment.” Ethics experts argue that the early spate of industry-friendly policy changes and personnel appointments amount to tangible evidence of the kinds of conflicts of interest that will keep coming up when a billionaire businessman is in the White House. They maintain that Trump should recuse himself on any decisions that affect the industries that his own company has a stake in.
Politico
an hour
Donald Trump’s presidency has been good for business, with a soaring stock market, a freeze on new regulations and an Oval Office that appears to have an open door for CEOs. But Trump has been especially good news for the industries in which he has a personal interest: real estate, construction, entertainment, hospitality, gambling and, of course, golf. Since taking office in January, Trump has made moves — from rolling back water quality permits to signaling big changes on overtime pay and internet betting — that benefit the fields he knows best. And his former peerspartners and competitors alike — are finding familiar faces in Trump’s White House and Cabinet agencies, who have the power to make even more of their wish lists come true. High on Trump’s list of early executive orders was one signed in February that begins reversing an Obama-era rule that gave federal protection to rivers, streams and wetlands — a big win for golf course owners and superintendents who say the rule forced more paperwork and made them unfairly susceptible to environmental fines.