Sky News
22 minutes
A study which Imperial College, London, claims it reduces the chance of premature death by 31 per cent which could save almost 8 million lives worldwide. That is the subject of our debate this morning at half-past nine: we are asking if all this advice on what to eat, what not to eat or drink, is just too confusing.
ITV
an hour
The truth is that there is a crisis in our prisons, a crisis of overcrowding and understaffing and the crisis of violence, drugs and disorder. The sad reality is that this bill will not solve the crisis. There are currently 85,000 people detained at her Majesty's pleasure and while Liz Truss hopes her plans will modernise the system she has said it will "take time and determination". Nick Dixon, Good Morning Britain. Forget your five a day. Scientists at Imperial College in London say we should be eating double that amount of fruit and vegetables. They double that amount of fruit and awful lot.
Daily Mail - Health
6 hours
The Sun Daily - World News
17 hours
PARIS: By 2030 life expectancy for South Korean women could top nine decades, an average lifespan long thought to be out of reach, researchers said today. South Korea is not only the first country in the world where women may live past 90 on average, it is also the one on track to log the biggest jump in longevity, they reported in The Lancet medical journal. Other developed countries are not far behind: the longevity of French and Japanese women are more likely than not to stretch past 88 years. "As recently as the turn of the century, many researchers believed that life expectancy would never surpass 90 years," said lead author Majid Ezzati, a professor at Imperial College London. Nations boasting the greatest longevity among men by 203084 years in each case – will likely be South Korea, Australia and Switzerland, according to the study. Among 35 well-off countries examined, life expectancy was predicted to increase across the board over the next 15 years.
Japan Times
18 hours
The public should have a say in the discussion on Imperial abdication.
BBC News 24
a day
By 2030 both men and women in the UK are expected to live well into their 80s, for the first time. Scientists at Imperial College London looked at the average life expectancy in 35 industrialised nations and discovered all would see If there is a barrier, we are not anywhere close to it.
euronews
a day
Sky News
a day
Life expectancy in humans is due to exceed 90 for the first time with women in South Korea predicted to average it by 2030. Scientists at Imperial College said low levels of smoking and good nutrition help them outlive all other nations. British women are predicted to live until the age of 82. This is a lovely idea: thousands of street parties are to be held across the country to remember murdered MP, Joe Cox.
Informed Comment
a day
Informed Comment
a day
By Danny Sjursen | (Tomdispatch.com) | The United States has already lost its war for the Middle East, that is. Having taken my own crack at combat soldiering in both Iraq and Afghanistan, that couldnt be clearer to me. Unfortunately, its evidently still not clear in Washington. Bushs neo-imperial triumphalism failed. Obamas quiet shift to drones, Special Forces, and clandestine executive actions didnt turn the tide either. For all President Trumps bluster, boasting, and threats, rest assured that, at best, hell barely move the needle and, at worst but why even go there? At this point, its at least reasonable to look back and ask yet again: Why the failure? Explanations abound, of course. Perhaps Americans were simply never tough enough and still need to take off the kid gloves.
BBC News 24
a day
Doctor James Bennett from London's Imperial College is the lead author of the study and joins us now from Auckland in New Zealand. Thank you very much for your time. Is it significant that the study only looked at industrialised countries? Because of course when you look at lesser developed nations their life expectancy is dramatically different.
Voice Of America
a day
South Korean women will be the first in the world to have an average life expectancy of 91 years, a new study predicts. Imperial College London and the World Health Organization analyzed lifespans in 35 industrialized countries. The study found all would see people living longer in 2030, and the gap between men and women would start to close in most countries. Scientists once thought an average life expectancy beyond 90 was impossible but medical advances, combined with improved social programs, are continuing to break barriers, including in countries where many people already live well into old age, according to the study's lead researcher, Majid Ezzati of Imperial College London. "I can imagine that there is a limit, but we are still very far from it,'' he said. Ezzati estimated that people would eventually survive on average to at least 110 or 120 years.
TIME - Top Stories
a day
(LONDON) While most people born in rich countries will live longer by 2030 with women in South Korea projected to reach nearly 91 Americans will continue to have one of the lowest life expectancies of any developed country, a new study predicts. Scientists once thought an average life expectancy beyond 90 was impossible but medical advances combined with improved social programs are continuing to break barriers, including in countries where many people already live well into old age, according to the study's lead researcher, Majid Ezzati of Imperial College London. I can imagine that there is a limit, but we are still very far from it, he said. Ezzati estimated that people would eventually survive on average to at least 110 or 120 years. The longevity of South Korean women estimated in 2030 is due largely to investments in universal health care, he said.
The Sun Daily - World News
2 days
The kindergarten has drawn attention for introducing a curriculum that includes the memorisation of an 1890 imperial edict which was widely used to promote militaristic education during World War II. A number of incidents of hate speech against specific ethnic groups on the streets or online have been reported in Japan in recent years. They are most commonly directed at Koreans who came to Japan when the Korean peninsula was under Japanese colonial rule between 1910-1945, and at their descendants who stayed in the country. China's rising economic and military profile, as well as a simmering territorial dispute with Japan over uninhabited islands in the East China Sea, have also raised tensions. — AFP
South China Morning Post
2 days
Sky News
2 days
Sam? It probably does need to be as radical as possible. It is not just infrastructure although that is an important part of the puzzle. It is things like research and development funding. We have brilliant universities in the north, but they are less likely to get funding than Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial College, round London.
The Economic Times
2 days
Daily Mail - Health
3 days
The Sun Daily
3 days
Avoid squabbles over almost all matters. Intelligence agencies play a key role in maintaining the balance of nuclear terror and preventing misunderstandings that can cause war. Flynn was a fanatical anti-Islamic wing nut. He was, to use Trumpese, a bigly terrible choice. I'm glad he is gone. But Flynn's sin was being loopy, not talking on the phone to the Russian ambassador. The White House and national intelligence should be talking every day to Moscow, even "hi Boris, what's new with you guys? Nothing much new here either besides the terrible traffic." The hue and cry in the US over Flynn's supposed infraction is entirely a fake political ambush to cripple the Trump administration. Trump caved in much too fast. The deep state is after his scalp: he has threatened to cut the US$80 billion per annum intelligence budget – which alone, boys and girls, is larger than Russia's entire defence budget! He's talking about rooting waste out of the Pentagon's almost trillion-dollar budget, spending less on Nato, and ending some of America's imperial wars abroad.
Politico
3 days
Nunes nodded to that new reality—and probably to Schiff’s Russia warnings—in his comments to CBS. “There are Russia hawks now,” he said wryly, “I think there’s more Russia hawks in Congress than there are congressmen and senators.” For Schiff and others in the newly-hawkish-on-Russia camp, there’s an explicit connection between Putin’s threatening moves and the rise of like-minded populist nationalists such as Trump in the United States and others in Europe. “We are in a new war of ideas, in which autocracy appears to be on the march, and we have to confront it,” he says. So what about the Republicans who had in recent years been so quick to criticize Obama for being soft on Putin and warning of Russian imperial designs across Eastern Europe? The same party that applauded when 2012 nominee Mitt Romney labeled Russia the No. 1 geopolitical threat to the United States? Had his GOP colleagues, I asked Schiff, suddenly changed their minds about Russia now that Trump is promoting a different line? His answer was as revealing about the state of play in Congress for President Trump as it was about anything having to do with foreign policy.
Global Research
3 days
BBC News 24
4 days
The tag line, 1700 years to build 500 miles long. What were they trying to keep out? So this is a spectacularly silly but spectacular film. Imperial China. Matt Damon is a mercenary in search of magical black power but he discovers the wall was built to keep out out mythical creatures. He encountered one early on and he cut its hand off.
Global Research
4 days
Autocar
5 days
Grandad, a talented worker of wood and a teacher of its assemblage when not lecturing about mathematics, had clearly completed his last buying spree in the late 1950s, a time when being well made and durable meant you came stamped with a ‘Made in Sheffieldtrademark and shone like stained glass. He owned, among other things, a micrometer that makes a nuclear reactor core look flimsy, a hand plane of such absurd heft and forged metal splendor that my manliness literally trebled by holding the thing aloft to look at it, and an ancient yet functioning electric drill that started its life on the line at de Havilland, boring holes in the balsa wood and birch that made up the monocoque of a Mosquito fighter bomber. Being a glorified typist, I have no practical use for any of this, of course – but the build quality, tonnage and overt imperial magnificence of the collection mean that I now own it all.