BBC News 24
an hour
likely to be Islamist related. Joining us now from Glasgow is Aamer Anwar, a human rights lawyer with a particular interest in Islamist-related terrorism. Wondering in Islamist-related terrorism. Wondering what in Islamist-related terrorism. Wondering what you in Islamist-related terrorism. Wondering what you make in Islamist-related terrorism. Wondering what you make of in Islamist-related terrorism. Wondering what you make of this? in Islamist-related terrorism. Wondering what you make of this? It's important to remember that as many slept safely in.
ABC News - South Australia
2 hours
A South Australian jury is urged not to decide the guilt of a man accused of brutally attacking two female backpackers on a remote beach at Salt Creek based on whether his actions were "creepy", even if the 60-year-old's "sexual morality might be questionable".
RT America
2 hours
RT America
2 hours
Voice Of America
3 hours
A U.S. lawyer for the family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran 10 years ago says the family is suing Tehran for damages based in part on leaked information from Iranian sources. “Iran, like the United States, leaks information,” said attorney David McGee in an interview with VOA Persian’s LateNews program Wednesday. McGee represents the Florida-based family of the missing American, Robert Levinson. “There are people who are in a position to know and who have talked, who have identified Bob as being in Iranian custody during this period of time.” McGee did not identify the Iranian sources of that information. Levinson’s wife and seven children filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia on Tuesday. The legal action seeks unspecified damages for injuries suffered by family members who accuse Iran of “unlawful acts of hostage taking, torture and other torts.
Deadline
3 hours
Ryan Kavanaugh hasn't come out with any more dough in his pocket, but Relativity gained a bit of financial traction today in the company's ongoing skirmish with Netflix . A U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge Wednesday ordered the streaming service to pay more than $800,000 in legal fees and expenses to the embattled film studio. "The Court holds that Relativity is entitled to an award of attorneys' fees and expenses as to Relativity's own counsel, but that Mr. Kavanaugh and...
Sputnik International
10 hours
Daily Mail - Australia
11 hours
The 26-year-old son of the Oscar-winning Leaving Las Vegas actor was with his mother, designer Christina Fulton, as he tended to the fallout of his car chase last month.
Variety
12 hours
Voice Of America
12 hours
Turkey's Foreign Ministry summoned the Norwegian ambassador in Ankara Wednesday to protest political asylum Norway reportedly granted to Turkish military officers allegedly involved in last year's failed coup. "This is not an acceptable situation," Turkish Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag said. "Europe should not become a safe haven for coup plotters, for terrorists and murderers." Reports from Norway say as many as five Turkish officers were given asylum. Their lawyer says they had been in Norway for a couple of years and that Turkey ordered them to return home after the July coup attempt. One of the officers told Norway's Verden Gang newspaper that they fear what will happen if they go back. "If I return, I will be detained and risk torture and will be forced to make a false confession. People die inexplicably in Turkish prisons." Turkey blames exiled U.
Politico
12 hours
Staffers lined up on the stairs, clapping as he made his way down. It was carried live by a local New York news station and by CNBCexactly the kind of grand send-off that fuels speculation about what he has in mind next. As it turns out, though, the “clap-out” is fairly common practice anytime someone leaves the US attorneys office. The bagpipers work at the courthouse as court security officers. They probably do something similar every two weeks or so, one lawyer in the office said. That the television cameras were there—well, that says more about the cameras than about Bharara. “I think people were pretty emotional about him leaving. It has been such a shock,” said one longtime deputy. “That he gets to stick it to Trump a little bit on the way out the door is I am sure something he enjoys.”
Mondoweiss
13 hours
Nassir has been serving a life sentence in Israeli prison for the past 25 years for shooting and killing an Israeli officer in 1993. “Without that money no way could Nassir have studied the way he has, we couldnt have afforded it,” Mayzuna told Mondoweiss . For the first three years that Nassir was imprisoned by Israel, the family was not provided with funds from the PNF, which took a huge toll on the family. “At the time we had to pay for his lawyer, for his clothes, for everything, it was very hard,” she said. “Inside the jail a small bottle of olive oil is 50 shekels ($13), more than double from outside the prison,” she said. “I dont know what we would do if we didnt have that money, I dont want to think about it, I just hope for his release.”
Radar Online
13 hours
Washington Free Beacon
14 hours
" Have a #STEM background? Are you ready to fight for #science , fact and reason? Sign up today. https://t.co/mo8iVcqgVp314action (@314action) January 11, 2017 Since 314 Action began last year, more than 3,000 science and math professionals have expressed interest in running for office, according to McClatchy. Several hundred also signed up for the group's all-day web training session, called STEM the Divide, on March 14. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Sen. Bernie Sanders' (I., Vt.) lawyer during his 2016 presidential campaign, Brad Deutsch, leads a seminar on campaign finance law for the scientists. McClatchy highlighted several female scientists who plan to run for public office in 2018. One of them, Jamie Tijerina, a Los Angeles resident who works in a cytometry lab, was elected to her neighborhood governance council and is researching moving into a higher political office.
ABC News - Money
14 hours
Goldman Sachs may be about to get another friend in Washington
Voice Of America
14 hours
Judges at the International Criminal Court Wednesday sentenced former Congolese vice president Jean-Pierre Bemba to an additional year in prison and fined him $324,000 for bribing witnesses during his earlier trial on war crimes. Four other members of Bemba's legal team also were sentenced by The Hague-based court. They were found guilty back in October of bribing and otherwise influencing 14 defense witnesses to try to tilt the outcome of the first trial, which led to a March 2016 conviction for war crimes and crimes against humanity. This was the ICC's first case dealing with witness tampering. Bemba's lawyer, Aime Kilolo, was given a two-and-a-half-year suspended sentence as well as a $32,000 fine for his involvement. Bemba is currently serving an 18-year term in connection with widespread abuses by his forces in the neighboring Central African Republic in 2002 and 2003.
Washington Free Beacon
14 hours
"To bite the senators?" Cooper asked. Toobin clarified before continuing. "To bite the senators," he said. Toobin said Gorsuch made Durbin look bad when the senator asked a question that he was ill prepared for. "You know, tried to confront him with a story that came out about a law school class that he taught where one woman thought he engaged in sexist behavior in the classroom and Gorsuch told the story of how he taught this case out of a textbook and went on to say that his mother was a pioneering lawyer in Colorado," Toobin said. "And I think completely turned the tide because Durbin broke the cardinal rule, which is you never ask a question to which you don't know the answer." The post CNN Analyst: Gorsuch Knows so Much More About Everything He's Being Asked Than the Senators' appeared first on Washington Free Beacon .
The Event Chronicle
14 hours
The Event Chronicle
15 hours
President Trump has refused to back off those claims. On Friday, in a joint press conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Trump joked that “ as far as wiretapping, I guess, by this past administration, at least we have something in common .” He defended his statements, saying the allegations of wiretapping were “ made by a very talented lawyer on Fox .” The White House seems to have been backed into a corner with the House Intelligence Committee’s hearings. These are likely to last for a few days, though they certainly havent been nailed to the wall. Unfortunately for Democrats, who had previously smelled blood in the water, they received no confirmation of their consistent allegations. Trump’s claims werent vindicated, either. In D.C., even Democratic sympathizers are beginning to characterize the Trump administration’s’ relationship with Russia as a room full of smoke .
Daily Mail - USA
15 hours
Voice Of America
15 hours
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch was grilled Wednesday during testimony before a Senate panel about his role in approving severe interrogation methods when he was an attorney in President George W. Bush's administration. The top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, Dianne Feinstein, questioned Gorsuch about why he had written "yes" on a document next to a question about whether a CIA torture program had produced useful intelligence. "My recollection of 12 years ago is that that was the position that the clients were telling us," Gorsuch said. "I was a lawyer. My job was as an advocate, and we were dealing with detainee litigation. That was my job." Another Democrat, Senator Patrick Leahy, asked Gorsuch if he agreed with the Bush administration's premise that the president has the authority to revoke torture and surveillance laws.
Politico
15 hours
Gorsuch also acknowledged Wednesday for the first time that he knew of no proof that the George W. Bush administration’s aggressive interrogation tactics had produced intelligence successes, despite the fact that he indicated as a Justice Department lawyer in 2005 that there was such evidence. “My recollection of 12 years ago is that that was the position that the clients were telling us. I was a lawyer. My job was as an advocate. And we were dealing with the detainee litigation. That was my involvement,” Gorsuch said, referring to his tenure as principal associate deputy attorney general. “So, you had no personal information?” Feinstein asked. “Oh, no,” Gorsuch replied. Feinstein did not seem entirely satisfied with that answer. “It seems to me that people who advise have an obligation to find the truth in these situations,” she said. “Things happened. It's a closed chapter. But it should never again happen. This is America. And it's not what we stand for.”
BBC Parliament
17 hours
what they do with it, we can't... The terms and conditions of ticket sales on our sites are specific, we will cancel those issues if we get them. But after the fact, it's quite difficult because the carry out some action, we have to suffer some form of damages I assume. I'm not a lawyer
ABC News - Money
18 hours
Goldman Sachs may be about to get another friend in Washington