PerezHilton
28 minutes
Futurity
2 hours
Early Mars may have had rings like Saturn, and might have them again, according to a new model. The research suggests that debris, pushed into space from an asteroid or other body, slammed into the red planet around 4.3 billion years ago and alternates between becoming a planetary ring and clumping up to form a moon. A theory exists that Mars' large North Polar Basin or Borealis Basin, which covers about 40 percent of the planet in its northern hemisphere, results from that impact, sending debris into space. That large impact would have blasted enough material off the surface of Mars to form a ring, says Andrew Hesselbrock, a doctoral student in physics and astronomy at Purdue University. The new model suggests that as the ring formed and the debris slowly moved away from the planet and spread out, it began to clump and eventually formed a moon.
Open Culture
4 hours
What happens when you cue up The Wizard of Oz (1939) and Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon (1973), and play them together? You get something magical. Or, to be more precise, you get “Dark Side of the Rainbow,” a mashup that first began circulating in 1995, back when the internet first went commercial. WatchDark Side of the Rainbow” ( here ) and you could believe that Floyd wrote Dark Side as a stealth Wizard of Oz soundtrack–though that’s something the band firmly denies. And, we believe them. But bury one rumor, and another takes its place. The Vimeo caption accompanying the other mashup above reads as follows: It has long been rumoured that Pink Floyd setEchoes ‘ to the final sequence of Stanley Kubrick’s, ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’. Two years before producing their albumMeddle ‘, featuring the 23 minute pieceEchoes’, Pink Floyd worked on the ‘More’ French film soundtrack, where they worked with film synchronisation equipment.
Daily Mail - Science
5 hours
Variety
7 hours
Design Milk - Art
7 hours
Dover Express
8 hours
The Event Chronicle
8 hours
By UFOholic The space race is on again, but this time, the stakes could be much higher. In a previous article I told you about Roscosmos (Russia’s government-run space agency) and the ESA (European Space Agency) having set up a plan to build a permanent base on the dark side of the Moon . Now the Russians are looking to set up a team of cosmonauts for a future lunar mission. Over the following four months, a rigorous selection process will take place and Russian citizens who meet the demands will get to set foot on Earth’s natural satellite. This will mark the first (official) time the people of the former USSR will land a manned vehicle on the lunar surface. Naturally, the requirements for acceptance will be harsh; superior education and a top physical and psychological shape are a must. The cosmonauts will have to be fit, under the age of 35, between 49 and 63 tall and their weight must be in between 110 and 200 pounds.
Ars Technica UK
10 hours
Enlarge Torment : Tides of Numenera opens with a literal bang. A moon explodes over the game's setting (simply called “the Ninth World”), and your avatar comes hurtling out of it toward the ground. Of course, you don't actually see any of this happen. Nearly all of the sometimes slimy, often depressing, and always cerebral story that follows this explosive introduction is conveyed in words, not in images and sounds. Once Torment begins in earnest, the game assumes the look of any number of top-down RPGs from a bygone era. You could liken it to Baldur's Gate or even Diablo , but the game's name alone makes it clear that this is specifically a successor to Planescape: Torment , and it was even pitched as such in its 2013 Kickstarter campaign . That intention shows in the game, too, in ways both obvious and intentionally obscure. One of the most obvious callbacks is your main character—"The Last Castoff” is the latest of many nigh-immortal bodies to be created and once inhabited by "the Changing God.
Scientific American - Latest
11 hours
The Herald - Transport & Environment
12 hours
Scientists have concluded that the moon is older than suspected - after studying rocks and soil collected in the 1971 Apollo landings.
BBC News - Entertainment & Arts
15 hours
What's it like to play 11 gigs in 96 hours? Rock band The Big Moon tell us in a video diary from SXSW.
Voice Of America
17 hours
Since the panels are always "on," Quick said the district will save additional money by banking the unused electricity that's generated when school is not in session. "These work year-round. Even in a full moon they will produce electricity," he said. Just 3 percent of the nation’s 125,000 schools use some form of solar energy. While not all can use solar power cost-effectively, a recent report by the Solar Foundation found that 72,000 US schools could save money with solar. Schools could install panels on their roofs or elevate a field of panels over a parking lot. Those innovations would save most schools an average of $1 million over 30 years. Educational component Going solar also offers schools an educational component. It provides teachers opportunities to incorporate lessons in science, technology, engineering, and math into the curriculum.
South China Morning Post
18 hours
Voice Of America
20 hours
Sky News
21 hours
after it was demoted to a 'dwarf planet' over a decade ago. Six scientists, from institutions across the United States, want to broaden the astronomical classifications. They're arguing that Pluto deserves to be regarded as a full planet, along with some 110 other bodies in the solar system, including Earth's moon. The scientists say geological properties, such as shape.
South China Morning Post
21 hours
It was 3am, and astronomer Maurizio Pajola had been up for hours looking through images taken by the Rosetta spacecraft of its dumpy, duck-shaped comet. Pajola had just started a new job studying Mars moon Phobos at NASAs Ames Research Centre. The only time he could continue this work on the Rosetta mission was the middle of the night. His eyes were beginning to glaze over when he spotted something unusual: A patch of something bright and white shining out from the comets...
China Daily
a day
The Event Chronicle
a day
The next one we have is Leannaarts, “Corey and David,” so I guess this is open to both of us “what are your thoughts on the idea that not only is the Earth a prison planet created by Reptilians, but that we are tortured by these beings after we die and encounter them in other dimensions? That they created religion, money magic system, and a magnetic Earth force field to control us, and a Moon operation to wipe our memories?” Corey: I think we're crediting the Reptilians with a little too much, to be honest. David: This is widely divergent with my own belief system, of course. Corey: Right. There are a number of nonterrestrials that are using this planet as a petri dish that they are doing experiments in. Yes, it is a prison planet. We're basically free-range slaves running around, thinking we're free, and that we have all this knowledge of the universe.
Daily Mail - Science
a day
Ars Technica
a day
Enlarge / Your companions form the emotional core of Torment and make the less sensible plot points easier to swallow. Torment : Tides of Numenera opens with a literal bang. A moon explodes over the game's setting (simply called “the Ninth World”), and your avatar comes hurtling out of it toward the ground. Of course, you don't actually see any of this happen. Nearly all of the sometimes slimy, often depressing, and always cerebral story that follows this explosive introduction is conveyed in words, not in images and sounds. Once Torment begins in earnest, the game assumes the look of any number of top-down RPGs from a bygone era. You could liken it to Baldur's Gate or even Diablo , but the game's name alone makes it clear that this is specifically a successor to Planescape: Torment , and it was even pitched as such in its 2013 Kickstarter campaign .
Techradar
a day
That said, it's still impressive to see Pokemon: Yellow Version playing on the Apple Watch, giving us hope that more developers can (legitimately) push the wearable's gaming clout going forward. Our tips & tricks to Pokemon's latest: Sun & Moon
The Event Chronicle
a day
Sputnik International
a day
Is the moon a planet? How about Pluto? Astronomical authorities say no, but Alan Stern, who led the research on the New Horizons probe to Pluto, begs to differ.