Techradar
19 hours
That's also the reason why incest is a really bad idea - a small gene pool is dangerous for the long-term health of a population. Genetic diversity is good. No sperm? No problem Dolly was created in a different way - a process that biologists call " somatic cell nuclear transfer ". No sperm is involved - instead, you use a body cell from an adult animal that you want to clone, and an egg cell. Remove the nucleus from both, pop the one from the body cell into the now-empty egg cell, and you get a cell that's ready to begin doubling. Zap it with some electricity and it'll start dividing. Credit: Wikipedia Sounds simple, right? It wasn't that easy - Dolly was the single success in 277 different tries at the process. It took decades of experiments before she was born, but today, we're a lot better at it. Only one in ten animal clones fail - though it does depend on the kind of cell used for the cloning, and the species.
Futurity
2 days
ScienceDaily
2 days
Imagine being able to view microscopic aspects of a classical nova, a massive stellar explosion on the surface of a white dwarf star (about as big as Earth), in a laboratory rather than from afar via a telescope. Cosmic detonations of this scale and larger created many of the atoms in our bodies. A safe way to study these events in laboratories on Earth is to investigate the exotic nuclei or 'rare isotopes' that influence them.
Goal
3 days
Phys.Org
4 days
Imagine being able to view microscopic aspects of a classical nova, a massive stellar explosion on the surface of a white dwarf star (about as big as Earth), in a laboratory rather than from afar via a telescope.
Phys.Org
6 days
Many of the secrets of cancer and other diseases lie in the cell's nucleus. But getting way down to that level—to see and investigate the important genetic material housed there—requires creative thinking and extremely powerful imaging techniques.
Politico
6 days
“Because your life is just getting sucked up in a certain direction? I dont know. I dont know.” Whether he intended it or not, Sanford was indeed caught—and the train was most definitely derailed. The political obituaries didnt take long to write. “He was banished to the hinterlands forever—by his party and by the media,” says Chip Felkel, a longtime South Carolina strategist and veteran of campaigns around the state. Suddenly, none of Sanford’s enviable attributes—his ability to connect one-on-one in retail settings; his total mastery of policy details; his open-book approach to fielding questions from voters and reporters alike; his fierce independent streak—seemed to matter anymore. He was finished. And everyone knew it. Sanford hadnt just destroyed his marriage; he had split the nucleus of his political operation. Jenny Sanford, a millionaire heiress to the Skil Corp.
Digital Trends
6 days
Phys.Org
7 days
Chemist John Dalton proposed the theory that all matter and objects are made up of particles called atoms, and this is still accepted by the scientific community, almost two centuries later. Each of these atoms is each made up of an incredibly small nucleus and even smaller electrons, which move around at quite a distance from the centre.
Phys.Org
7 days
Universe Today
7 days
This animation of comet 45P/H-M-P is composed of thirteen delay-Doppler images made during 2 hours of observation using the Arecibo Observatory on Feb. 12. Credit: USRA Comets hide their central engines well. From Earth, we see a bright, fuzzy coma and a tail or two. But the nucleus, the source of all the hubbub, remains deeply camouflaged by dust, at best appearing like a blurry star. To see one up close, you need to send a spacecraft right into the comet's coma and risk getting. Or you can do the job much more cheaply by bouncing radio waves off the nucleus and studying the returning echoes to create a shadowy image. Although crude compared to optical photos of moons and planets, radar images reveal much about an asteroid including surface details like mountains, craters, shape and rotation rate. They're also far superior to what optical telescopes can resolve when it comes to asteroids, which, as their name implies, appear star-like or nearly so in even large professional telescopes.
SPACE.com
7 days
The end may be near for a comet that has been breaking into pieces for more than 20 years. On Feb. 12, viewers using the Slooh online observatory's telescope in Chile were among the first to see the nucleus of Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann break into two
The Event Chronicle
8 days
Tesla claimed that the device could melt any engine, and that if aimed at the moon, would turn a spot on the surface to incandescence. Scalar waves can produce a great repelling force on the atomic nucleus, bypassing the outer electron shells, directly engineering or interfering with the components of the nucleus. Private research in USA shows scalar waves operate in a non-linear time dimension which is hyperspace, at any speed from zero to infinity, as they are not limited to the speed of light. 3. THE CONTINUATION OF TESLA’S SCALAR WAVE TECHNOLOGY Most western universities ignore Tesla’s work due to a conspiracy to stop free-energy and anti-gravity technology, because of the loss of money for big business that would be generated by this, but Eastern European and Russian universities include it in their curriculum, which is why the U.S. didnt realize that scalar waves were being used against them, due to no equipment for detecting such waves, until they had been secretly attacked for ten years by the Russians using them since about 1960 when President Khrushchev announced the Soviets had some superweapons.
Universe Today
8 days
Over 200,000 of these stars were also observed by Gaia and information on them was included in its initial data release. As they explain in their study, which was published in the Journal of Astrophysical Letters in November 2016, they used this to examined the speeds at which these stars orbit the center of the galaxy (relative to the Sun), and in the process discovered that there was an apparent distribution in their relative velocities. In short, our Sun moves around the center of the Milky Way at a speed of 240 km/s (149 mi/s), or 864,000 km/h (536,865 mph). Naturally, some of the more than 200,000 candidates were moving faster or slower. But for some, there was no apparent angular momentum, which they attributed to these stars being scattering onto chaotic, halo-type orbits when they pass through the Galactic nucleus. As Hunt explained in Dunlap Institute press release : “Stars with very close to zero angular momentum would have plunged towards the Galactic center where they would be strongly affected by the extreme gravitational forces present there.
STV
8 days
This inquiry report says all of that, and it's the most important report in literally decades. A new archive housing millions of records from Britain's nuclear industry has opened just miles from the Dounreay plant in Caithness. The £21 million Nucleus Centre in Wick will store documents, photographs and films charting the history of 70 years of nuclear power in the country. Here's Nicola McAlley. "This site in the north of Scotland "was selected for Britain's first nuclear power station "based on the fast breeder reactor principle.
STV
9 days
And Nucleus will also house the Caithness archive, with the region's civic history also finding a new home here. 20 people will be employed at the archive; this remote corner of the north of Scotland remaining a key player in the story of Britain's nuclear industry for decades to come.
STV
9 days
Funded by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, the Nucleus Centre will house documents, photographs and films from 17 nuclear sites across Britain, dating back to the 1940s. Some top secret records will be kept under lock and key, but most will be accessible to academics, historians, scientists and others with an interest in the industry.
STV
9 days
But the temperatures will rise into double figures for everyone. I'll have more details later on in the programme. A new archive housing millions of records from Britain's nuclear industry has opened just miles from the Dounreay plant in Caithness. The £21 million Nucleus Centre in Wick will store documents, photographs and films charting the history of 70 years of nuclear power in the country.
STV
9 days
BBC One Scotland
9 days
One of the most high-tech archive centres anywhere in Britain opens its doors today in the Highlands. The £21 million Nucleus complex in Wick has been purpose-built to house all the records, photos and film footage, which document the development of the UK's civil nuclear industry.
ScienceDaily
9 days
BBC Parliament
15 days
I hear what the right honourable gentleman says, but having known the Secretary of State for business and shared many a warm cup of tea with him, I can assure him that I accept his warm words and I expect him to be in his post for a number of years in order to take forward this. I wonder if my right honourable contributor, the Germans, have decided to phase out the nucleus of a programme altogether.
Phys.Org
16 days
More and more scientists are using the powerful new gene-editing tool known as CRISPR/Cas9, a technology isolated from bacteria, that holds promise for new treatment of such genetic diseases as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia. But to work well, the new gene-clipping tool must be delivered safely across the cell membrane and into its nucleus, a difficult process that can trigger the cell's defenses and "trap" CRISPR/Cas9, greatly reducing its treatment potential.
Nottingham Evening Post
16 days