Open Culture
12 hours
All images courtesy of Lori Pond It is not often noted that the surrealist movement in the 1920s originated with poets like Paul Éluard and André Breton , himself a trained psychologist, who drew explicitly from the work of Sigmund Freud , “the private world of the mind,” as the Metropolitan Museum of Art puts it. And yet we certainly see the influence of Freudian poetry in the work of Giorgio de Chirico, Marcel Duchamp, Salvador Dalí, Joan Miró, and Man Ray. We also see it, inexplicably, in the work of Hieronymus Bosch , that 15th century Dutch painter of bizarre works like The Garden of Earthly Delights , a triptych that becomes exponentially more nightmarish as one scans across it from left to right. (Take a virtual tour of the painting here ), and from which photographer Lori Pond draws in the astonishing photographs you see here. How does such a faraway figure as Bosch, whom we know so little about, seem to communicate so closely with our epoch’s artistic movements? The Garden of Earthly Delights , writes Stephen Holden at the New York Times , “outstrips in boldness many of the extreme digital fantasies in Hollywood horror films.
The Sun Daily
2 days
Cerruti turned the clock back to the 1930s in its search to find the roots of the suit. The result was a show that was lock, stock and two smoking barrels of gangster chic which channelled both Al Capone and "Goodfellas" influences from the 1950s. Wide fur-collared coats were matched with Homburg hats and three-pieces suits for the capos and shirts, braces and "Peaky Blinders" style Irish caps for the foot soldiers. For all its mobster vibe it had none of the simmering menace of Australian Justin O'Shea's failed attempt last year to make over Brioni in his own image with gangsterish silk shirts and full-length chinchilla coats. Margiela too eschewed cheap machismo in its collection inspired by the American Beat poets Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. Its two suits were unadorned, simply cut showing the man within rather than trying to put on a show.
TIME - Top Stories
3 days
There's a nice tension between those two things, the real and the fantastical. How has your poetry affected your work in comic books? Harvey: For the first project I kept resisting. I thought being a poet was a negative somehow. But then I had to embrace what poets do, examine tiny details and draw out a larger story. And it helps with the language and the voice of the characters. I have this little trick where I imagine the poetic voice of the character, whether it's very terse or romantic or sensitive.
Voice Of America
4 days
The 63-year-old senator represents the dusty northern province of Antofagasta, home to many of top copper producer Chile's mines. Guillier said he wanted to give local governments more power. Chile should build more smelters for its mines to replace its increasingly dated ones, he said. Guillier's main Nueva Mayoria opponent is another former president, Ricardo Lagos, who is seen as a more steady, business-friendly prospect. Lagos, 78, is a hero of the democracy movement that ousted former dictator Augusto Pinochet, but he has struggled to gain momentum against Guillier. "Each era has its musicians, its poets, its philosophers, but times change and we want new ones," Guillier said.
Open Culture
4 days
All images courtesy of Lori Pond It is not often noted that the surrealist movement in the 1920s originated with poets like Paul Éluard and André Breton, himself a trained psychologist, who drew explicitly from the work of Sigmund Freud, “the private world of the mind,” as the Metropolitan Museum of Art puts it. And yet [...] Photographer Creates Stunning Realistic Portraits That Recreate Surreal Scenes from Hieronymus Bosch Paintings is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook,... That's the beginning of the story. Please visit our site for all of the rest!
Cotswold Journal
5 days
MUSICIANS and poets are coming out in force against racism and xenophobia at an event in Stourbridge this week.
The Huffington Post
7 days
On January 15, I went to a rally on the steps of the New York Public Library. It was sponsored primarily by PEN--an organization of poets, essayists and novelists (of which I am a member) to focus attention on protecting the First Amendment--freedom of speech. It was the first activist event I've gone to since I marched against the Viet Nam War. It was a large gathering of thoughtful people. In general, writers think before they commit words to public viewing. Many poems were recited including those that had been performed at presidential inaugurations. The Twitter tag #loudertogether reminded us solitary workers in our silos that we need to speak up every chance we get if we want to protect the First Amendment. In our history, from Common Sense, to the Declaration of Independence to our precious Constitution, words have power. The rally consisted of many eloquent expressions and reminders of what we stand to lose with this new presidency.
BoingBoing
7 days
The format for Scot Nery’s weekly BoobieTrap show is the wackiest I’ve ever seen. It’s vaudeville on steroids with Nery as the amped up and kooky ringmaster. The performers range from jugglers to contortionists, magicians and poets – but the first time I attended, the standout talent was a wooden dummy named Joey and his human named Karl Herlinge r. I’ve seen ventriloquist acts before, but these two had an edge that kept me thinking for days on end, and at times I forgot about who was controlling whom. If you stop and think about it, the very idea of ventriloquism is pretty darned crazy. These performers choose to get in front of theaters full of people and have heated conversations and arguments with themselves. It’s hard enough to captivate an audience with story, dance, or musical talent when all you have to worry about is yourself, but imagine having to simultaneously play the role of two distinctly different personalities, while controlling a hidden levers that create the illusion of emotions in a wooden dummy.
RT America
7 days
KyivPost
7 days
“There are some ideological separatists, but there are fewer of them here than in some other regions located much further from the frontline,” he said. Language power Born in Zhytomyr Oblast in the northwest of Ukraine, Zhebrivsky uses the Ukrainian language as a tool for increasing support for Ukraine. His office resembles that of a teacher of Ukrainian language and literature. It has a wheat sheaf wrapped in a rushnyk (a traditional Ukrainian embroidered towel), two small banduras (the traditional Ukrainian musical instruments), a lyalka-motanka (a traditional Ukrainian stuffed doll) and a book by Ivan Franko (one of Ukraine’s most famous poets.) A view of Pavlo Zhebrivsky's office in Kramatorsk on Jan. 14, 2017. (Anastasia Vlasova) Earlier this month Zhebrivsky ordered all of his staff to speak only Ukrainian in the office. In 2016, he organized Ukrainian language classes for his officials.
Ruptly TV
8 days
TIME - Top Stories
10 days
(BOSTON) America's leading poets are averse to Donald Trump, and they're not about to go gentle into that good night. Poetry slams and other literary events are being organized nationwide in the run-up to the President-elect's Jan. 20 inauguration. Some, like this weekend's Writers Resist rallies in New York, Boston and 90 other U.S. cities, are overtly in protest. Others are merely an attempt to find a little solace and beauty in verse. Our country was founded on brilliant writing, said Erin Belieu, an award-winning poet who runs the creative writing program at Florida State University. She hatched the Writers Resist movement to re-inaugurate the best of our democratic ideals. On Sunday, poets, writers and artists will gather in 32 states as well as in Amsterdam, Hong Kong, London and Singapore to read aloud from their own works and quote inspirational passages from others.
Washington Free Beacon
12 days
The Huffington Post
12 days
For example, in medieval Spain, the Troubadour poets borrowed their lyrical beauty from Arabic . Arabic was the courtly language of southern Spain until the 15th century. Similarly, the 12th-century Palatine Chapel in Sicily was painted and gilded in the imperial style of the Fatimids , the rulers of Egypt between the 10th and 12th centuries. Such exchanges were common, thanks to the mobility of people as well as ideas. The point is that the story of Islam cannot be told without a deeper understanding of its cultural history: Even for early Muslim rulers , it was the Byzantine empire, the Roman empire and the Sassanian empire (the pre-Islamic Persian empire) that provided models. Such overlaps continued over the centuries, resulting in heterodox and cosmopolitan societies. The term "Middle East" - coined in the 19th century - fails to describe the complex social and cultural mosaic or religions that have existed in the region most closely associated with Islam - and continue to do so today.
Informed Comment
12 days
For example, in medieval Spain, the Troubadour poets borrowed their lyrical beauty from Arabic . Arabic was the courtly language of southern Spain until the 15th century. Similarly, the 12th-century Palatine Chapel in Sicily was painted and gilded in the imperial style of the Fatimids , the rulers of Egypt between the 10th and 12th centuries. Such exchanges were common, thanks to the mobility of people as well as ideas. The point is that the story of Islam cannot be told without a deeper understanding of its cultural history: Even for early Muslim rulers , it was the Byzantine empire, the Roman empire and the Sassanian empire (the pre-Islamic Persian empire) that provided models. Such overlaps continued over the centuries, resulting in heterodox and cosmopolitan societies. The termMiddle East” – coined in the 19th centuryfails to describe the complex social and cultural mosaic or religions that have existed in the region most closely associated with Islam – and continue to do so today.
Glastonbury Festival
12 days
Once again, Poetry&Words are opening our floodgates to a delicious deluge of poets from far and wide. Every year we take applications to perform on Glastonbury Festival’s poetry stage , and every year we are awestruck by the hundreds of amazing wordsmiths out there. Last year we hosted an abundance of talent from international stars Buddy Wakefield and Tanya Evanson, to home grown greats John Hegley and Murray Lachlan Young. If you’d like to walk in their footsteps, then this is your chance! Were looking for applications from experienced writers and performers , with something quite excellent to offer the audience of the world’s biggest greenfield arts festival. If you want to apply, please e-mail poetryandwords@hotmail.co.uk with a short bio and 1-3 video and/or audio files of you performing your work, preferably to a live audience. We’d prefer web links, but attachments (of manageable size!) will also be accepted.
Informed Comment
13 days
For example, in medieval Spain, the Troubadour poets borrowed their lyrical beauty from Arabic . Arabic was the courtly language of southern Spain until the 15th century. Similarly, the 12th-century Palatine Chapel in Sicily was painted and gilded in the imperial style of the Fatimids , the rulers of Egypt between the 10th and 12th centuries. Such exchanges were common, thanks to the mobility of people as well as ideas. The point is that the story of Islam cannot be told without a deeper understanding of its cultural history: Even for early Muslim rulers , it was the Byzantine empire, the Roman empire and the Sassanian empire (the pre-Islamic Persian empire) that provided models. Such overlaps continued over the centuries, resulting in heterodox and cosmopolitan societies. The termMiddle East” – coined in the 19th centuryfails to describe the complex social and cultural mosaic or religions that have existed in the region most closely associated with Islam – and continue to do so today.
BBC News 24
15 days
I think also it strikes me, the first decade or so, the very strict sense of genre or place, whether it's performance poetry or page poetry or poetry that is somehow linked to the visual arts, all of those things seem to have collapsed into each other, which makes for a very fertile, and fecund landscape for poets nowadays. A lot of the barriers have been broken down, I think. If you're talking about a contemporary world where there is a sense of drift, where people don't quite know where we're headed, after the economic crash, after 9/11 and so on.
Politico
16 days
http://bloom.bg/2illp4B --“Shame on you,” by Firmin deBrabander in Aeon Magazine: “Unburdening ourselves online can feel radical and liberating. But is baring and sharing all as emancipatory as it seems?” http://bit.ly/2hYJNNC --“Literary Agents,” by Patrick Iber in TNR: “Rethinking the legacy of writers who worked with the CIA.” http://bit.ly/2iNlFum (h/t ALDaily.com) --“1999 Was The Last Time Everything Was Fine,” by BuzzFeed’s Doree Shafrir: “When I moved to New York City after college in 1999, it felt like anything was possible. But things were about to change more quickly than anyone knew.” http://bzfd.it/2hYJceH (h/t Longreads.com) --“Staring into the Soundless Dark: On the Trouble Lurking in PoetsBedrooms,” by Andrew Ka in The Millions: “Philip Larkin’s ‘Aubade’ [is a 1977 poem that] describes an experience all of us have at some point, that of waking up much earlier than we’d intended and, unable to get back to sleep, lying in a hazy torment in which all our life’s anxieties are amplified tenfold.
Beijing Bulletin
16 days
Washington Free Beacon
16 days
The use of repetition for mimetic or rhetorical effect falls flat in a few others. A pumpjack bows to the ground Again, again, again in one poem. In another, leaves are Spinning and spinning without sound. I come back to the world. I come back / to the world, he writes in a poem on the Canyon de Chelly, and would speak of it plainly, / with only so much artifice as words / themselves require. Alas, not always. Still, Hammer Is the Prayer is full of far more successes than partial successes. The volume also shows Wiman's skill at narrative and translation. He includes the wonderful long poem Being Serious (the title alludes to Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest ) from Hard Night , and a selection of his Osip Mandelstam translations. Few poets today can write lines like this: I have no illusion / some fusion / of force and form / will save me, / bewilderment / of bonelight / ungrave me.
BBC News 24
18 days
I think also it strikes me, the first decade or so, the very strict sense of genre or place, whether its performance poetry or page poetry or poetry that is somehow linked to the visual arts, all of those things seem to have collapsed into each other, which makes for a very fertile, and fecund landscape for poets nowadays. A lot of the barriers have been broken down, I think. If you're talking about a contemporary world where there is a sense of drift, where people don't quite know where we're headed, after the economic crash, after 9/11 and so on, poetry, historically, has been the classic vehicle for distilling those senses, those feelings, those arguments.
Washington Free Beacon
18 days
Politico
18 days
The article includes such unusual citations as a link to the website of Busboys and Poets, where Obama took several clemency recipients to lunch, along with more academic data on crime and policing. In it, Obama touts his efforts to drive to make criminal justice reform a front-burner issue,, including a historic visit to the El Reno federal prison in 2015. But he also acknowledges the role of social media, and explains why his silence often left both sides of the debate unsatisfied in a message that echoes his broader warnings about Trump’s shoot-from-the-hip commentary. “Presidents are not private citizens,” Obama writes. “We need to be careful about speaking about legal matters before all the facts are in — even if it appears that everyone else in the United States is commenting on them.” He continues, “Oftentimes, it is a viral YouTube video that leads the evening news, incites protests, and drives calls for reform.