BBC Radio Ulster
12 minutes
Voice Of America
an hour
The Economic Times
2 hours
TIME - Top Stories
4 hours
S. forces in the region, and it is working to perfect its longer-range missiles. North Korea's state-controlled media had no immediate comment. But a day earlier, the North said leader Kim Jong Un had watched a successful test of a new type of anti-aircraft guided weapon system. It wasn't clear from the state media report when the test happened. Kim found that the weapon system's ability to detect and track targets had remarkably improved and was more accurate, according to the official Korean Central News Agency. KCNA cited Kim as ordering officials to mass-produce and deploy the system all over the country so as to completely spoil the enemy's wild dream to command the air. The North's nuclear and missile programs are perhaps the biggest foreign policy challenges to the new leaders in Washington and Seoul. President Donald Trump has alternated between bellicosity and flattery in his public statements about North Korea, but his administration is still working to solidify a policy to handle its nuclear ambitions.
BBC One Wales
5 hours
I've never known a case not to produce surprises. This has left a lot of unanswered questions
Ars Technica
9 hours
Can give this to AI—generally more visually interesting than "the cloud." (credit: Disney) Back when I was doing research, one of my advisors once joked that, if you wait long enough, you can produce an old result using new methods, manage to get it published, and everyone will be impressed. I think his time limit was 15 years. Apparently, when it comes to big ideas about science (rather than scientific results), the schedule's a bit accelerated. Just shy of 10 years ago, Chris Anderson, then Editor-in-Chief at Wired, published a piece in which he claimed that cloud computing was making the scientific method irrelevant. All those models and theories didn't matter, so long as an algorithm could identify patterns in your data. The piece was wrong then, as I explained at the time (see below). It hasn't gotten any more right in the meantime. Yet a quote from Chris Anderson's article led off a new column last month that essentially says Anderson was right, he just had the wrong reason.
TIME - Top Stories
10 hours
The Economic Times
10 hours
We were supposed to get it done last year. We worked under tremendous fund constraints. I am relieved we could complete the project. It is India's biggest blast furnace and can produce 12,000 tonnes of hot metal per day or 4.2 million tonnes per year. With the sinter plant and coke ovens running, we are now a fully integrated steel plant.Why did the project take so long to complete?Our original business model was based on coal gasification using swadeshi coal with higher ash content. But after the coal block was de-allocated in 2014, the project became uneconomical. We incurred Rs 7,000-8,000 crore in losses. A lot of investment had already gone into the project. Setting up a blast furnace and using coking coal was the only solution. Earlier, the whole investment was for two million tonnes (mt). At a fraction of the cost, we have now added 4 mt of steel capacity using the same infrastructure.
The Iran Project
15 hours
The Event Chronicle
16 hours
One could even argue that the circle in the middle could be the ‘all-seeing-eye’. Soylent Green In addition to using humans as batteries to substitute energy being blocked from the sun the machines liquefy humans who cannot produce anymore energy and are used as sustenance for the other humans. There are many reports coming out that human meat is being found at McDonald’s meat packaging warehouses. Can anyone else think of what a psychopathic secret society would do with hundreds of thousands of ‘missingchildren that they sacrifice every year? Why not feed them to the population! The moral of the story being, avoid fast food. The Second Coming Now I am not a big fan of religion but I’ve found it is becoming more important to study some of the information in various religious texts around the world. One of those being the return of Christ. Now I’m on board with David Wilcock’s research into this as he posits that it simply means a return of a higher consciousness or awareness of the Universe or The One.
The Iran Project
18 hours
FNA- Managing Director of the National Petrochemical Company Marziyeh Shahdaei announced that the NPC will considerably boost its production capacity in the current Iranian year (will end on March 21, 2018). Iran has plans to process 72 million tons of petrochemicals by the end of the current year, Shahdaei said. He reiterated that Iran's petrochemical output will exceed 120 tons per year by the end of the 6th five-year development plan to 2022. In relevant remarks in mid-April, Shahdaei announced that over two dozen projects will become operational by the end of the current Iranian year A sun of 30 new petrochemical projects will come on stream by the end of this year, Shahdaei said on Sunday, addressing the opening ceremony of four petrochemical projects. She reiterated that Iran's petrochemical industry will turn into a front runner for attracting foreign investors.
Futurism
18 hours
First, it is highly specific. When properly set up, the molecular scissors that make up the CRISPR system will snip target DNA only where you want them to . It is also incredibly cheap. Unlike previous gene editing systems which could cost thousands of dollars, a relative novice can purchase a CRISPR toolkit for less than US$50 . Research labs around the world are in the process of turning the hype surrounding the CRISPR technique into real results. Addgene, a nonprofit supplier of scientific reagents, has shipped tens of thousands of CRISPR toolkits to researchers in more than 80 countries, and the scientific literature is now packed with thousands of CRISPR-related publications . When you give scientists access to powerful tools, they can produce some pretty amazing results. The CRISPR revolution in medicine The most promising (and obvious) applications of gene editing are in medicine.
BBC One London
19 hours
example it is OK to produce videos or broadcast videos of seven-year-olds being bullied as long as it wasn't accompanied by captions, I don't think you need to be an expert to say that is not acceptable. Something more worrying for you as.
Voice Of America
21 hours
Food waste She said the project is helping to raise awareness of food waste around the world. “A third of all food globally goes to waste,” she said. “That is unconscionable. People do not actually have a notion of what that could look like. Yes, that they know they walk into a supermarket and reject an apple but do not actually think what that means, and here in this free supermarket where you can take what you need and give if you can, it is to put out into the public that opportunity to come in and learn, come in and engage and it is a great collaboration.” Australia is a throw-away society. It is estimated that food waste costs the economy about $15 billion a year. About a third of all discarded produce is thrown away by businesses, sometimes because vegetables and fruit have blemishes or an irregular shape. Business model creates waste Food waste campaigner Katie Barfield says corporate Australia is very wasteful.
Autocar
a day
But with orders already reaching into production years ahead, he knows he’ll have to think again – hence the “bigger boatobservation. Any rethink will have to start with consultations with suppliers about their ability to deliver more components, Brown says: “In the meantime, our job is to make sure the cars are ready for production in every detail. We wouldnt want to start and then find we had to make alterations.” He understands the requirements of production better than most people: one of his biggest businesses was a dump-truck manufacturing concern that started out making just one vehicle in its first year, but built up to produce 7.5 of these mammoth £300,000-plus vehicles every day – before his firm was bought by Caterpillar. Why choose to remake Alec Issigonis’s famous little city car? “We’d been thinking about a new project for quite a while,” says Brown.
ITV4
a day
Right throughout, they've got a lot of depth. But it's all about consistent performances, and they produce that, week in, week out. Others have found the going tougher, in a season where the foundations for success have had to be re-thought and re-built, under the same relentless glare of expectation
BBC Radio Ulster
a day
aquatic stores near because bills can a companies tend to come and go especially for this fine day by one they do come and go we are actually know the oldest sperm in the world construct construct of customer racing car and particularly unique in that wear operation from the same factory in Hollywood places to come and go or they move premises they were using the original Jake's in the original premises West still a family insurance under the different ownership now so what kind of cars are we talking about this use a formula and you think those McLaren's and Ferraris does not turn up quietest F1 is there no doubt that get up tours for the formula to he did produce informer two cars and I think I needed.
ITV4
a day
But my hands were just tied. I was down in 21st with a really good car but it just wasn't letting me produce the times. We just got on top of it for that last run. And a big sigh of relief for all the BMW guys
BBC News 24
a day
most cinema fans will accept the new world order - particularly if it continues to produce such onscreen spectacles. One of the most talked-about films this year was The Square. Here, the filmmaker, Ruben Ostlund,.
The Sun Daily
a day
BBC News 24
a day
and this is what the Conservatives are relying on. Young voters are flocking to Corbyn, on the basis he wants to make university education free and renationalise the railways and produce a magic money tree and give money away. And domestic pointers that people have welcomed. That it does resonate with
Asia Today
a day
The Sun Daily - Health
a day
FREEZE-DRIED mouse sperm that spent nine months in space has been used to produce healthy rodent offspring back on Earth, Japanese researchers said this week. But could the same hold true for humans? And if conception were even possible in space, would babies born in zero gravity develop differently than their Earth-bound counterparts? As Nasa and other global space agencies work furiously on propelling people to Mars by the 2030s, experts say essential questions of survival on the Red Planet are often overlooked. Rocket scientists have little grasp of how humans would live and breathe on Mars, or if they even could withstand the powerful doses of cosmic radiation they'd receive on the two- to three-year journey. A key component to colonising other planets – as SpaceX chief Elon Musk has vowed to do on Mars – would be having babies, said Kris Lehnhardt, assistant professor in emergency medicine at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
BBC News - Top Stories
a day