RT YouTube
2 minutes
Vanity Fair
35 minutes
MintPress News
an hour
Would Moscow team up with Washington in Bannon's war? MSNBC terrorism analyst Malcolm Nance seems to think so , arguing that Bannon is attempting to “align the United States and Russia together in a Christian war against Islam.” Putin might face a dilemma if Tehran, which is on the receiving end of war talk from the White House, is goaded into crossing a red line that is then used to justify military action. But Israel, which wants sanctions against Iran, could make a good bedfellow. Although accusations of anti-Semitism have plagued Bannon, he has always been a staunch supporter of Israel due to its strong militarised religious nationalism and opposition to what he would refer to as radical Islam. Other allies could include France’s Marine Le Pen , whose National Front party shares Bannon’s hatred for “ financial globalisation and Islamist globalisation .
NewsMax World
an hour
KyivPost
3 hours
Ruptly TV
4 hours
BBC News 24
5 hours
The Iran Project
6 hours
The US, however, also imposed new sanctions against Iran in early February as part of bids to ratchet up pressure on the country, chiefly over Tehran’s missile program. Further supporting Iran’s defensive work, Zarif recalled the foreign-backed war imposed on Iran by the former Iraqi regime in 1980s, “when everybody in the international system, including the United States” was backing the Arab country under former dictator Saddam Hussein against the Islamic Republic. “Our people do not forget the fact that they were being bombarded. Everybody was providing assistance to the aggressor and no one, absolutely no one, gave us even the rudimentary means of defense,” he added. ‘Iran not an easy targetThe Iranian top diplomat was then asked for comments on the US, Israel, and Saudi Arabia’s threats of military action against the Islamic Republic. “First of all, we’re not talking about the law of the jungle.
The Guardian - World news
7 hours
The Guardian - World news
7 hours
Politico
7 hours
So, first of all, what is your feeling about the state of play today, on where we stand with the story of President Trump, General Flynn, and the Russians? Schiff: Well, it has been a very topsy-turvy week. And it’s still all the more bewildering because we now know that the president was informed that Mike Flynn had misled people. And that, to me, is very troubling because he was aware the vice president had misrepresented the facts to the American people. And that was okay until he was confronted with it by this story in the The Washington Post . And that was what forced the firing of Mike Flynn. And even now, [President Trump] seems to be trying to apologize to Flynn for firing him. So the whole thing is very bewildering. How much was this designed to undermine President Obama’s sanctions on Russia for their very interference in the presidential campaigninterference which was designed to help Donald Trump? And more, probably, we need to look at this in the context of Russian influence measures in the United States.
Politico
7 hours
S. intelligence agencies that the hacking was aimed at electing Trump. Many Democrats today remain furious about that timetable, wondering whether Obama’s hesitant response to the hacking and unwillingness to speak out more forcefully before Nov. 8 may have inadvertently helped Trump win the presidency. Regardless, the conversation with Schiff makes clear that there’s an entirely new politics to Russia in the U.S. today, and nowhere more so than on Capitol Hill, where historically it has been Republicans who, even long after the end of the Cold War and collapse of the Soviet Union 25 years ago, remained much more critical of Putin’s heavy-handed rule and expansionist foreign policy across the former Soviet territory. For the most part, they still are—and when reports circulated that Trump’s White House was considering lifting some sanctions on Russia as an early executive order, it was strong pushback from Republicans on the Hill, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, that helped to table, or at least delay, whatever plans there were; the subsequent furor over Flynn and his Russia entanglements makes that even less likely to proceed for now.
Fast Company
7 hours
The Iran Project
8 hours
FNA- Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned against the threats posed by atomic weapons, and called for nuclear disarmament of all the world countries. The time is now ripe for destroying the nuclear bombs of those countries possessing such weapons instead of accepting others to the nuclear club, Zarif told reporters on Sunday night. The Iranian foreign minister said that nuclear weapons will not bring about security neither for Iran nor for any other country. Asked about US President Donald Trump’s threats against Iran, Zarif said Iran will not be affected by coercion, rather it well responds to respect. Everybody tested us for many years, all threats and coercions were imposed on us, the Iranian foreign minister said. He went on to say that when the so-called crippling sanctions were imposed on Iran, the country had less than 2,000 centrifuges, but when the US came to the negotiating table, Iran had 20,000 centrifuges.
The Herald
8 hours
A NEW ministerial bid is being made to curb he closure of a series of Scottish job centres.
Sputnik International
8 hours
Media reports on plan on Crimea and the possible lifting of anti-Russia sanctions is nothing more than an attempt to draw attention away from Poroshenko's failure to implement Minsk deals, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said during a presser on Monday.
Voice Of America
8 hours
The Iran Project
9 hours
Sputnik International
9 hours
The Iran Project
9 hours
The Iran Project
9 hours
The Iran Project
9 hours
We owe it to the people of the world to do our best in order to achieve this. We should not lose this opportunity. Of course if people don't see their national interests served by this, those who are involved in the negotiations can walk away. And that won't be the end of history. That won't be the end of the world. But we owe it to ourselves, we owe it to our people, we owe it to the international community, to use the momentum that has been created in order to reach an agreement. Sanctions were there. I mean we considered them illegal. We considered them ill placed. But those who believed in sanctions believed they were there to reach an agreement. Now, if we have an agreement, which we don't yet, we're trying to, if we can an agreement, then why you need sanctions? The other issues that people are raising, and we have a few of them that we can raise on our own, those issues can be resolved in the future, can be addressed in the future separately.
Sputnik International
9 hours
The Iran Project
10 hours
NBC Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif dismissed the possibility of renegotiating the nuclear deal, telling NBC News there's little appetite for opening Pandora's box. His remarks Sunday on the sidelines of the Munich Security Conference come amid a recent escalation in hostilities between the Trump administration and Tehran. I believe the nuclear deal is going to last, the foreign minister said firmly. The White House recently said it was putting Iran on notice over a ballistic missile test and then imposed new sanctions on Iranian companies and individuals. But Zarif warned that Iran doesn't respond well to such language and dismissed sanctions as ineffective. Threats do not work against Iran, Zarif told NBC News. It would work much better if they decided to use the language of respect, the language of mutual interest.