Informed Comment
2 days
Unlike blacks within white-ruled South Africa who, at the time, were not citizens of their own nation and had little hope of federal protection, blacks across the deep South could succeed because they were citizens not only of their own states, but of the United States. Few in the 1960s believed that marching, demonstrating, sitting in, agitating, witnessing, disrupting, or singing could ever change the minds, much less the policies, of a half-dozen southern governors, a hundred county sheriffs, or millions of white segregationists. The Montgomery bus boycott was successful in driving the bus company to the edge of bankruptcy, but legal bus segregation remained intact until the Supreme Court stepped in. Well-schooled in the strategies of Gandhi, civil rights leaders knew of the critical value of mass meetings, collective action, and civil disobedience for building resolve, visibility, and a powerful sense of community, but they also knew its limits: solidarity was not enough.
The Huffington Post
3 days
Arnold Schwarzenegger expertly schooled an internet troll who mocked athletes with intellectual disabilities at the Special Olympics World Winter Games. On Thursday, the movie star-turned-politician praised those competing at the 2017 event in Austria via this heartwarming Facebook video: These guys inspire me! the former governor of California captioned the clip. But, sadly, not everyone shared his view . One person reacted by posting that the Special Olympics make no sense. The Olympics are for the best athletes in the entire world to compete against each other to determine who is best, they wrote. Having retards competing is doing the opposite. Schwarzenegger didnt hold back with his response, which he called a teachable moment. As evil and stupid as this comment is, Im not going to delete it or ban you (yet) because its a teachable moment.
BBC One South West
5 days
in it is very local. It's the story of Lieutenant Colonel Percy Fawcett, who was born in Torquay and schooled in Newton Abbot. He was a former soldier, cartographer, spy and explorer - some might argue the inspiration for that well-known film character Indiana Jones
MintPress News
5 days
We hope that this investigation will help shed light on some of the recent threats against Jewish institutions, which have caused great concern both among Jewish communities and the Israeli government, Israeli public security minister Gilad Erdan said in a statement. The suspect, who has not been named, has lived in Israel for many years, according to Haaretz , and he was found unfit for military service. He was home-schooled, the Israeli newspaper added, and is refusing to cooperate with police. US Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the arrest reflected the government's determination not to tolerate hate crimes. The Department of Justice is committed to protecting the civil rights of all Americans, and we will not tolerate the targeting of any community in this country on the basis of their religious beliefs, Sessions said I commend the FBI and Israeli police for their outstanding work on this case.
PC Pro
5 days
Wilfred Collins 2 min 6 sec ago Science Nasa has been schooled by a UK pupil after he spotted an error in their data collection. A-level student Miles Soleman beat Nasa at its own game after spotting an error in the International Space Station’s (ISS) data, and making it known to the space agency Miles found a negative energy reading (for non-science buffs you can’t get negative energy) in an A-level project in which his class was analysing scientific data. However, It wasnt a completely out of the blue. Nasa scientists seem to be slacking a little, as data is often shared with school students in the hope of spotting errors like these. Nasa were aware of Mileserror (or so they say) but the problem’s scale is what made his discovery noteworthy. The data error was thought to only be occurring once or twice a year, but in fact was happening everyday.
BBC One South West
5 days
far greater than you ever imagined. The film may be typically Hollywood, but the main character in it is very local. It's the story of Lieutenant Colonel Percy Fawcett, who was born in Torquay and schooled in Newton Abbot. He was a former soldier, cartographer, spy and explorer -.
Global News
8 days
A 12-year-old Kelowna boy has won his tuition to attend a space academy in Alabama because of his exceptional abilities in academics. Marcus Coetzee, a grade-six home schooled student, will be attending the U.S. Space Academy this June in Huntsville, Alabama. The program is designed for students from grades four to 12 although to win...
Informed Comment
8 days
Daily Mail - Rugby Union
10 days
The Sun Daily
10 days
"This is the country of our birth, the place where we toddled when we were small, were schooled and grew up in, earn a living as adults and when the time comes, we will be laid to rest here, where we were born," he said. Citing a number of good and bad incidents that occurred in the country, Najib said as citizens who loved Malaysia, all must continue to defend the country from internal and external threats. One example of a bad incident the prime minister gave was the infiltration by militants from southern Philippines in Lahad Datu and Semporna, Sabah on March 3, 2013 which took the lives of members of the Royal Malaysian Police (PDRM). Recalling the incident, he said when a team from the Malaysian security forces tried to enter a house in Kampung Sri Jaya, Semporna to arrest the terrorists involved, they were ambushed due to the action of a police corporal who divulged information on the operation.
Washington Free Beacon
11 days
" Putting ketchup on his $54 steak drives a wedge between Trump and his fans ," reports Marketwatch.com, citing a silly PPP poll in order to expel Trump from the in-group. Does Trump put "Bernaise? Chimichurri? Peppercorn?" on his steak? Negative. "Instead, Trump went with ketchup, that most pedestrian of all condiments." Lock him up! I am fascinated by the condescending use of "pedestrian," with its connotations of déclassement , to describe one of America's most popular condiments. What it suggests is that the fixation with Trump's manner of eating is in reality a fixation with the persistence of habits and attitudes and trends that the over-schooled and undereducated metropolitan producers of news and opinion do not like, deem retrograde, wish would recede into the past as humanity progresses toward its gender-neutral, multicultural, borderless, medium-rare steak au poivre future.
ABC News - United States
11 days
Forbes
13 days
Achievement Hunter's 'Schooled' series is back for a second season, and now the kids are partnered with AH members. I talked to Geoff Ramsey, Ryan Haywood, and Jack Pattillo about their experience filming the second season with teammates significantly younger than them.
InfoWars
15 days
Cop claims "There is a new law. Turn it off, or I’ll take you to jail.”
Voice Of America
16 days
Faced with aggressive on-air questioning about the president’s wiretapping claims, Sarah Huckabee Sanders didnt flinch, she went folksy. Speaking to George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America, she pulled out a version of an old line from President Lyndon Johnson: “If the president walked across the Potomac, the media would be reporting that he could not swim.” The 34-year-old spokeswoman for President Donald Trump was schooled in hardscrabble politics and down-home rhetoric from a young age by her father, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. Her way with a zinger, and her unshakable loyalty to an often unpredictable boss, are big reasons the deputy press secretary is a rising star in Trump’s orbit. In recent weeks, Sanders has taken on a notably more prominent role in selling Trump’s agenda, including on television and at White House press briefings.
The Herald - Scottish Premier League
16 days
SABC Digital News
18 days
The SA Agulhas 1 is back in South Africa after a three month research voyage. On her was 30 trainee cadets who are being schooled in the study of marine biology and vessel maintenance. We once again welcome our reporter, Jayed-leigh Paulse who is with the cadets For more news, visit: http://www.sabc.co.za/news
Petrolicious
19 days
When I think of Harleys, or almost any motorcycle that isn't from Italy or Japan for that matter, I'm reminded of the many encounters I've had with them; often a big loud blob of a bike that leaves me temporarily deaf as it passes by clad with every kind of leather tassel and strap and bag available in the catalog. Put in other words, I don't like them. But, as with a lot of things in life, the judgement of a few should not extend beyond those few. I learned this during my recent visit to the Petersen Automotive Museum , where their new Harley vs Indian exhibit schooled me on the weighty history of these staples of 2-wheeled American culture. While yes, the typical cruiser bikes were present, there was so much to complement them that I didn't really mind the Loud Pipes Save Lives types on display alongside the more unique stuff.
BBC World News
20 days
Beijing Bulletin
21 days
Daily Mail - USA
22 days
Daily Mail - USA
22 days
The Sun Daily - Showbiz
a month
At the age of just 14, she made a PowerPoint presentation entitled "Project Hollywood" to persuade her parents to allow her to drop out of school and pursue a movie career. The pitch worked and she and her mother moved to LA, where Stone was home-schooled between auditions. "It's nuts that they agreed to it," Stone told The Hollywood Reporter. "I don't condone it. Everybody should go through high school and graduate." Her first role came with the part of Laurie Partridge in the VH1 talent/reality show In Search of the Partridge Family. She has appeared in more than 20 movies since her 2007 debut in Superbad but really came to the fore as a major talent in The Help, Tate Taylor's 2011 drama about the racism faced by black maids in 1960s Mississippi. A string of hit films followed, including two Spider-Man movies and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's Birdman, which earned Stone a best supporting actress nomination. — AFP
PinkNews
a month