Sputnik International
an hour
The Iran Project
2 hours
It is only after a certain destination becomes popular with tourists that hotel chains begin to study its potential, he said. It takes at least a year before investors decide whether expanding their business in the target destination is profitable. Shirkavand noted that hotel owners are gradually moving toward building properties in Iran, adding that no contracts to build hotels have been signed yet. Iran has set an ambitious target of 20 million tourists a year by 2025, which should potentially generate $25-30 billion. The main obstacle, however, is its aging and underdeveloped infrastructure, particularly hotels. The country has 180 four- and five-star hotels, while industry insiders say it needs at least 400 good quality lodging facilities to accommodate the projected 20 million travelers. French group AccorHotels became the first foreign branded hotel to set up shop in Iran after the 1979 Islamic Revolution when they opened two hotelsIbis and Novotel–last October near Imam Khomeini International Airport, 30 km south of Tehran.
The Economic Times
3 hours
By stapling a green card or (a) visa to their diplomas, these professionals can invent and innovate new discoveries that grow our economy," Paulsen said. Quigley, in his remarks, said if the US was serious about fostering innovation, spurring economic activity, and staying competitive in the global marketplace, it must encourage the brightest minds in the world to study, work, and stay in its communities. "We cannot advance our technology or research if we continue sending foreign-born, but US educated, students with advanced degrees away," he said. Noting that the H-1B visas are subject to annual caps that are woefully short of the number necessary to fill high- skilled jobs, the two lawmakers in a statement said numerous studies have found that H-1B visas correspond with an increase in jobs for native citizens. For example, a 2011 American Enterprise Institute study found that "an additional 100 foreign-born workers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, or mathematics) fields with advanced degrees from US universities is associated with an additional 262 jobs among US natives," they said.
The Economic Times
3 hours
This is far from invoking any 'nationalist' argument. But sensationalising issues based on anecdotal interviewsis unfair to India's most global and key industry, and a huge disservice to potential aspirants wishing to join it. Reports of mass layoffs are incorrect. Six lakh people were hired in the last three years, 50,000 in Q4 of 2016-17 alone by only the top five companies. The industry will be a net hirer in 2018. Performance-linked workforce realignment, which impacts less than 3 per cent of the workforce, has barely changed this year. Lower attrition, automation and the industry focus on innovation and enhanced efficiencies have seen a gentle deceleration in hiring growth rates — but on a growing base. Consequently, the industry expects to hire more people in the next eight years than it did in the previous eight. The oft-quoted McKinsey study that talks of one million existing jobs being destroyed in the future also points to 1.
SABC Digital News
3 hours
The Sun Daily
4 hours
He said they also became obsessed with certain individuals who made use of religion, and performed acts that deviated from the teachings of the Quran. Ahmad Zahid, who is also Home Minister, said a study conducted by the ministry found that 87% of those involved in terrorist activities did not have basic religious education. He said the government had taken the measure of detaining individuals involved with terrorist groups and conducting de-radicalisation programmes to rehabilitate them. "We pray that no acts of terrorism occur in our country," he added. Meanwhile, during the ceremony, Ahmad Zahid donated 320 copies of the Quran to the programme's participants. He also read the Al-Baqarah chapter from the Quran together with 400 participants. Also present at the ceremony were the mosque's chairman Datuk Thobrani Hanafi, and the programme's facilitator, Sheikh Said Abdellatif Karawia. — Bernama
Voice Of America
8 hours
People with a common cluster of symptoms that puts them at increased risk of heart disease and diabetes are two times as likely to die as people without those risk factors if they get less than six hours of sleep per night. That was the finding of a new study conducted by researchers at Pennsylvania State College of Medicine and reported in the Journal of the American Heart Association. So-called metabolic syndrome is marked by elevated blood sugar, high blood pressure and cholesterol, and excess fat around the waistline. A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome also includes a high body mass index (BMI), a measurement of a person's weight relative to his height. People with a high BMI and other symptoms of metabolic syndrome are at increased risk of developing heart disease and diabetes. Study participants In the study, a group of 1,344 adults agreed to spend one night in a sleep clinic.
The Economic Times
8 hours
Between 1991 — when it opened its economy — and 2013, India absorbed less than half the new entrants into the labor market. So while its working-age population rose by 300 million, the number of employed people increased by just 140 million, a UN study showed. In contrast, China' working-age population grew a lesser 241 million over the same period and it created 144 million jobs. Tax Reform Looming over India's economy is the introduction of a national sales tax, scheduled for July 1. The federal government hopes that the GST will lead to a jump of 14 percent in revenue growth as more taxpayers are integrated into the formal economy and move on to digital modes of payment. Yet some businesses and analysts fear there will be chaos as millions transfer to the new system."Certainly there will be an adjustment period, there is no doubt about that," Panagariya said.
CNN
9 hours
Of all the things contemporary adults believe are vital for a good marriage, a satisfying sex life and fidelity are often the top two. So it's no wonder that a recent study that reports that American couples in the early 2010s have sex, on average, nine fewer times per year than couples in the 1990s did has set off alarm bells. The decline occurred only among cohabiting or married individuals rather than their single or dating counterparts.
USA Today - Top Stories
9 hours
A recent study shows there are tangible negative impacts of having your phone notifications on all the time. Sometimes silence is golden. iv
Sputnik International
11 hours
A new study has confirmed two important things: females prefer well-endowed mates who are good listeners. Well, if we’re talking about moths anyways.
Sputnik International
11 hours
A new study has confirmed two important things: females prefer well-endowed mates who are good listeners. Well, if we’re talking about moths anyways.
Mashable
11 hours
Nope. No. Noooooooooooo. A researcher witnessed boas in Cuba hanging from the ceiling of a cave to snag flying bats out of the air. That's terrifying enough. SEE ALSO: Huge rotting sea creature that washed ashore is horrifyingly turning the water red But he also saw them form a wall of snakes so the bats couldn't escape without getting within striking distance of a hanging boa. So yeah, just a group of snakes hunting together in a pack, nothing scary about that. (The Cuban boa, by the way, averages anywhere from eight to nearly 10 feet long.) The three snakes observed didn't always hunt together, according to the study, published recently in Animal Behavior and Cognition . But when they did, they almost always caught a bat unlike when they hunted alone, when they'd leave hungry two-thirds of the time. Teamwork, yay! Read more... More about Cuba , Bats , Snakes , and Science
Daily Mail - Science
12 hours
The study found that during Greenland's hottest summers on record, 2010 and 2012, the ice in Rink Glacier on the island's west coast slid through the glacier's interior in a gigantic wave
ScienceDaily
12 hours
Stroke patients who learned to use their minds to open and close a plastic brace fitted over their paralyzed hands gained some ability to control their own hands when they were not wearing the brace, according to a new study. The participants, all of whom had moderate to severe paralysis, showed significant improvement in grasping objects.
ITV
12 hours
Smith, who has Asperger's syndrome, had been obsessed with weapons and guns from an early age. He had moved from Devon to south London to study computer science at university, and built the improvised explosive device at the home he shared with his mother, using cheap and simple components easily available to buy, packed into a thermos flask
ScienceDaily
13 hours
ScienceDaily
13 hours
The Economic Times
13 hours
IT cos have solid hiring plans in place; jobs meltdown is just a media myth. Read whyThe oft-quoted McKinsey study that talks of one million existing jobs being destroyed in the future also points to 1.9 million new jobs created in the same time frame.
The Economic Times
14 hours
Software cos in India have good hiring plans, jobs meltdown is a media myth. Read whyThe oft-quoted McKinsey study that talks of one million existing jobs being destroyed in the future also points to 1.9 million new jobs created in the same time frame.
ScienceDaily
14 hours
A study shows that asymptomatic women who have been treated for early-stage breast cancer often undergo advanced imaging and other tests that provide little if any medical benefit, could have harmful effects and may increase their financial burden.
Futurism
14 hours
Fast Forward to the Future In effect, this research indicates that the human brain not only produces an image of the future movement in fast forward, the brain's visual cortex also works in tandem with past experiences to predict future outcomes. Most probably, it developed this ability to predict the future in order to facilitate quicker action that could be the difference between life and death. Click to View Full Infographic Imagine you are standing at a road, a car is approaching and you need to decide Do I cross, or do I wait for the car to pass first?', lead researcher Matthias Ekman told The Daily Mail . Our study suggests that our visual system can fast-forward the trajectory of the car and thereby help us with our decision whether to wait or not. This is just one example of research expanding our understanding of the infinitely complex human brain.
The Sun Daily
14 hours
A NEW study from the University of Michigan has found that the best way for women to stick to exercise is to choose something they actually enjoy, rather than for the sole purpose of losing weight. Funded internally by the National Cancer Institute, the new small-scale study asked 40 women aged 22-49 to say what makes them feel happy and successful in life, and how this relates to their exercise goals. "A new understanding of what really motivates women might make an enormous difference in their ability to successfully incorporate physical activity into their daily routine – and have fun doing it," said Michelle Segar, director of the University of Michigan's Sport, Health, and Activity Research and Policy Centre. The main answers given by women, who were categorised as "high active" or "low active", were connecting with and helping others be happy and successful, being relaxed and free of pressures during their leisure time, and accomplishing goals, which could range from that day's grocery shopping to career goals.
The Economic Times
14 hours
The oft-quoted McKinsey study that talks of one million existing jobs being destroyed in the future also points to 1.9 million new jobs created in the same time frame.