Al Jazeera
24 minutes
BBC News 24
30 minutes
Your father's restaurant sometimes was visited by pretty obnoxious, racist people. Yes, we went through a really bad period. And I think many people from the Bangladeshi community and others would say, actually there is less overt racism today then there was back then, 30, 40 years ago. I wonder why you feel more of an outsider now? It's changing, no? With Brexit I think things are changing.
France 24
an hour
In another possible sign of tensions, a Saudi delegation in December visited a massive hydroelectric dam being built on the Nile in Ethiopia -- a project which seriously worries Egypt as the river provides more than 90 percent of its water. "The idea that we can count on Saudi Arabia as an economic partner for Egypt has started to fade," Ghitani says. It is unclear how concerned officials are in Riyadh following the latest ruling. Anwar Eshki, a retired Saudi general and founder of the independent Middle East Centre for Strategic and Legal Studies in Jeddah, says there is "no problem between Saudi Arabia and Egypt" about the decision. "This is an internal affair," he says, describing the court battles as a reflection of domestic Egyptian struggles. In Tuesday's edition of Saudi Arabia's Arab News, editor-in-chief Faisal Abbas also played down the dispute, saying that contrary "to some local media", Saudi Arabia "remains one of Egypt's biggest allies".
Channel 4
2 hours
He's a thug and a butcher. In his final days in office, Joe Biden has visited Ukraine, to reassure President Poroshenko of America's commitment to the current sanctions regime. It's hard to hear, but when he's asked whether the next administration would make Ukraine a priority, the Vice President replies hope springs eternal.
Al Jazeera
2 hours
Sputnik International
3 hours
At the end of last week, US Secretary of State John Kerry visited Vietnam. It was not only his last visit to the country as the head of the State Department but the event actually closed the “pivot to Asia,” for the Obama administration.
Daily Mail - India
3 hours
The beauty, 24, visited the UNHCR refugee border entry points in northern Uganda on Tuesday - where she happily played and chatted to the suffering young women for hours on end.
Politico
3 hours
They have privately angered business executives, who say business policy shouldn't be set by a president-elect in 140 characters. Publicly, however, executives have spoken glowingly about Trump’s approach to the business community, given they have no other choice. Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg, whose company has been the target of Trump’s tweets for the price tag of its Air Force One contract, visited Trump Tower again on Tuesday and said the president-elect is doing a “great job with engaging business.” Trump seems to enjoy the spectacle of it all, and has so far gotten commitments from a number of companies to keep jobs in the United States - and from other companies to enter into negotiations on the price of jets. He's using the bully pulpit pretty damn well if you ask me, said Vincent Pitta, a labor lawyer in New York who is friends with Trump and has met with him twice since he won office.
Politico
3 hours
They have privately angered business executives, who say business policy shouldn't be set by a president-elect in 140 characters. Publicly, however, executives have spoken glowingly about Trump’s approach to the business community, given they have no other choice. Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg, whose company has been the target of Trump’s tweets for the price tag of its Air Force One contract, visited Trump Tower again on Tuesday and said the president-elect is doing a “great job with engaging business.” Trump seems to enjoy the spectacle of it all, and has so far gotten commitments from a number of companies to keep jobs in the United States - and from other companies to enter into negotiations on the price of jets. He's using the bully pulpit pretty damn well if you ask me, said Vincent Pitta, a labor lawyer in New York who is friends with Trump and has met with him twice since he won office.
Voice Of America
4 hours
It is an issue which needs to be addressed, but for now I think the priority should be on water and sewerage systems and refuse collection,” Masitara said. Last week, the doctors group called on the government to release funds to ensure medicine imports are not delayed. On Tuesday, the doctors said their call had not been answered positively. 'Deplorable' Health Minister David Parirenyatwa on Tuesday visited Mbare township, the epicenter of the typhoid outbreak. He blamed the city of Harare for failing to ensure hygienic conditions. “We will not be able to get rid of typhoid or cholera or diarrheal diseases as long as we have conditions like these ones. Even if I say, 'Every hospital in this country, stop treating anything else except typhoid or cholera,' we still do not have a solution. The solution is that we still need hygienic conditions in this country, particularly here in Harare.
Ruptly TV
4 hours
BBC News - Top Stories
4 hours
The BBC's Jeremy Bowen has visited the site of Aleppo's Umayyad Mosque to see what's left after the war in Syria.
DNews
4 hours
Mondoweiss
5 hours
Adli eventually traveled to Egypt for surgery which improved his condition. When he returned to Gaza, his friend Mansour was waiting for him. Mansour visited Adli regularly and encouraged him to have faith and patience ... Mansour would need to take the same advice he had given to his friend ... .“I was passing by some of my neighbors, near al-Muntar hill, when they were directly attacked” in an Israeli airstrike, Mansour recalled. “I stayed in a coma for 10 days and when I got out of it, I realized what had happened to my leg, in addition to losing two of my fingers.”... The two friends decided to stick together as they faced their new reality. “We knew that everything would be easier as long as we’re together,” Mansour said. “I do almost everything with Adli.” Adli said: “Luckily, we have the same foot size and the same taste in shoes. When we buy a pair of shoes, I take the right shoe and Mansour takes the left one.
Plymouth Herald
5 hours
The Event Chronicle
5 hours
Emperor Charles had not lost any of his members to decay, except only the tip of his nose. Emperor Otto replaced this with gold, took a tooth from Charles's mouth, walled up the entrance to the chamber, and withdrew again. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Scriptores, VII, book III, 32 11 Allegedly, other emperors later visited this tomb. In 1165, Friedrich Barbarossa removed the remains and had them interred in a sarcophagus (allegedly) belonging to Caesar Augustus. Friedrich II (allegedly) put the bones in a casket of gold and silver. (He put something in there, but at this point, it is not safe to say what 12 .) People visit these relics of Charlemagne in Aachen, just as they visit the other great Aachen relics, the ones which are displayed every seven years: St Mary's cloak, Christ's swaddling (baby) clothes, St John the Baptist's beheading cloth, and Christ's loincloth (or undergarment).
Lincolnshire Echo
6 hours
More than 600 fines have been handed out to drivers who park dangerously outside schools since the launch of a road safety operation. A CCTV road safety car, managed by Nottinghamshire County Council, has visited schools across the county on several occasions to monitor parking issues since it was launched in March last year.As a result, 612 penalty charge notices have been handed out 380 were given to drivers who parked on keep clear markings, while 232 were given to people...
TIME - Top Stories
6 hours
To everyone RTing glowingly about the Great Leader Xi's comments about trade, openness, and other BS.....are you *#&@$! drunk? Comrade Balding (@BaldingsWorld) January 17, 2017 Xi visited Davos with a delegation of more than 80 business executives. The message was that China believes in globalization at a time when the rest of the world is doubting it. But it also gave a hint of panic: if trade is diminished with the West, China will have one more crisis tugging at a vulnerable economy. This article originally appeared on Fortune.com
TIME - Top Stories
6 hours
Acupuncture may help babies who cry too much, according to a new study published in the journal Acupuncture in Medicine . Infants with coliccrying for more than three hours a day, for at least three days a weekhad fewer symptoms after getting the traditional Chinese needling technique compared to the standard treatment. Most human acupuncture research has been in adults, and studies have linked the practice with reduced pain, improved gastrointestinal function and increased calm. To find out if it might help with excessive crying in infants, researchers recruited 147 healthy babies between two and eight weeks old who had all been diagnosed with colic. The babies and their families were assigned to one of three groups, and they visited a child health center twice weekly for two weeks. Parents in all three groups spoke with a nurse about their childs symptoms, and two of the groups also received acupuncture.
Daily Express
7 hours
BoingBoing
7 hours
BBC News 24
8 hours
And the way rescue was able to systematically shoot dead so many tourists has shown how little security there was At the resort, even though the Tunisians had said security had been improved. Today a senior Foreign Office official admitted they had not been formally monitoring the security arrangements in Tunisia, but said their chocolate by stress the high risk of terrorist attacks, including in areas visited by foreigners.
ESA Navigation
8 hours
Voice Of America
9 hours
Omar Tarshan had never visited any of Syria's famous public baths until three weeks ago, when a water shortage in his Damascus neighborhood forced him to look for an alternative place to shower. On Monday night, the 25-year-old accountant came with a colleague, Safwat Hariri, to the 1,000-year-old bath house in the old quarter of Damascus — the Hammam al-Malik al Zahir — where each was given two towels, a loofah and a piece of traditional olive oil soap. Minutes later, they stepped into the bath, enveloped by thick vapor. The two men share the frustration of many other residents of the Syrian capital, forced to wait in long lines to fill their jerry cans after fighting with rebels in a valley northwest of Damascus cut off the main water line for the city last month. The more affluent, pay tanker trucks to come and fill up their tanks at home. "We have no water at home and so I discovered the public bath," said Tarshan, a terry cloth wrapped around his waist.