Autocar
an hour
LTC is also planning to export the taxi globally, with worldwide deliveries starting in early 2018. LTC CEO Chris Gubbey said " There are negotiations in five key markets throughout Europe and they’ve all been successful. Due to the very uniqueness of our product, we can be competitive. “Today marks the rebirth of the London Taxi Company. A company with a singular vision; to design and build dedicated urban commercial vehicles that can operate without emissions in cities around the world and bring down running costs for drivers," added Gubbey. Chairman Carl-Peter Forster added : “The opening of our new plant sets a number of records; it’s the first brand new automotive manufacturing facility in Britain for over a decade; the first dedicated electric vehicle factory in the UK; and the first major Chinese investment in UK automotive. We are extremely proud of what we have achieved today, and we have firmly put our stake in the ground as a new, global, automotive leader in urban commercial vehicles.
Fast Company
2 hours
It's the biggest cosmetics brand in the world, and it's out to prove that businesses in any sector can make conscious choices to cut their environmental footprint. It's the biggest cosmetics brand in the world, and it's out to prove that businesses in any sector can make conscious choices to cut their environmental footprint. Valued at $13.69 billion and employing around 78,000 people worldwide, the L'Oréal Group is the largest and most profitable company in the cosmetics industry. Between 2005 and 2016, it increased production volume across its 34 brands by 29%. But in the same time frame, the company reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 67%. "We are really serious about sustainability across all of our products and services," Alexandra Palt, L'Oréal's chief sustainability officer, tells Fast Company . And that commitment, she adds, can go hand in hand with economic success. Read Full Story
BBC News 24
2 hours
worldwide is that Muslims are separate and Muslims need their own state and to live under their own law and oh no allegiance for a garden -- Raiola no allegiance to for example of British Governor -- payola no allegiance
Voice Of America
2 hours
Japan Times
3 hours
Information Age
4 hours
Fox News
4 hours
Ars Technica UK
4 hours
Enlarge (credit: Vignesh Natarajan ) The male equivalent of the at-home pregnancy test may have just landed. With a simple smartphone device and a chip that slurps up sperm, men can easily and cheaply measure the count and motility of their swimmers . The test is about 98 percent accurate, takes less than five seconds, and requires no training to run, Harvard researchers report Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine . It’s also cheap—the device and the microfluidic chip cost just $4.45 total to manufacture. Researchers are hopeful that the invention will help couples trying to have children—as well as those trying not to. Worldwide, it's estimated that more than 30 million men face fertility issues at some point. And couples in developing countries or remote areas may not have easy access to fertility clinics. On the flip side, those who undergo vasectomies are encouraged to monitor their sperm counts afterward to make sure the procedure worked.
The Week
4 hours
Car production up on weaker pound and export rise The weaker pound and overseas demand combined to lift British car production to its best February for 17 years. According to the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, output rose by 8% to 153,041 units last month compared with a year ago. Production also sped up from January, when it rose by 7.5% year-on-year. Exports were up 13.4% to 118,898 in February. Quote of the daySingle market benefits 'largely imaginary' "The evidence shows that the disadvantages of non-membership of the EU and single market have been vastly exaggerated and that the supposed benefits of membership, whether for exports of goods and services, for productivity, for worldwide trade, or for employment, are largely imaginary." A study from social policy think-tank Civitas argues that no EU deal is better than a bad deal.
South China Morning Post
4 hours
The Iran Project
4 hours
It was the latest in a string of deadly attacks that have struck major cities in Europe over the last two years, including Paris, Nice and Berlin. It came as Belgians were commemorating last year’s coordinated suicide bombings, which killed 32 people and injured more than 300 others at the Brussels airport and a subway station. Wednesday’s attack played out around some of the most iconic sites in Britain, including Westminster Bridge, where the car plowed into pedestrians; the River Thames, where one woman was rescued after either jumping or being knocked off the bridge; and Parliament, whose Gothic Revival buildings have long stood as a symbol of representative government worldwide. Witnesses reported hearing a commotion, shouting and the sound of gunfire when the car crashed into a railing. A man, who was reportedly clad in black and wielding what was described as an 8-inch knife, then exited the vehicle and ran toward Parliament, where he was confronted by police.
Voice Of America
4 hours
"Cure rates for drug-resistant TB are poor and people can remain infectious." TB is a bacterial infection normally treated with a combination of antibiotics. But extensive overuse of antibiotics worldwide has led to a rise in drug-resistant "superbug" strains. Bacteria can acquire many drug-resistance traits over time, making several types of antibiotics ineffective. Some 1 in 5 cases of TB are now resistant to at least one major anti-TB drug, the researchers found. Around 1 in 20 are classed as multidrug-resistant (MDR) — meaning they are resistant to two essential first-line TB drugs, isoniazid and rifampicin — or extensively drug-resistantmeaning they are also resistant to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs. Approximately half of global cases of MDR-TB are in India, China, and Russia, but migration and international travel have allowed these highly drug-resistant strains to emerge in almost every part of the world.
MSNBC
4 hours
ScienceDaily
11 hours
Despite worldwide progress since the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC) came into effect in 2005, not all key demand-reduction measures have been fully implemented at the same pace, but doing so could reduce tobacco use even further, say researchers.
Digital Trends
11 hours
Samsung has a lot to prove after the Galaxy Note 7 recall, and the Galaxy S8 will be its first step in regaining consumer trust. The Korean giant skipped out on launching its product at Mobile World Congress alongside competitors and has opted for its own worldwide event. Follow us for everything you need to [...] The post Samsung Unpacked appeared first on Digital Trends .
Voice Of America
11 hours
Voice Of America
11 hours
MSNBC
12 hours
Voice Of America
12 hours
BBC Two England
13 hours
because if you launch an attack on Westminster Bridge you will have worldwide coverage, guaranteed. That is something to do with the choosing of this location. Have we reached.
Daily Mail - India
13 hours
The shadow cast by the terrorist group is far bigger than in south India, as figures reveal indoctrination rates across the whole of the country.
ITV
13 hours
MSNBC
14 hours
Ars Technica
14 hours
Enlarge / The smartphone-based semen analyzer tests for male infertility in seconds from the privacy of home with a 3D-printed setup costing less than $5, which can analyze most semen samples in less than 5 seconds. (credit: Vignesh Natarajan ) The male equivalent of the at-home pregnancy test may have just landed. With a simple smartphone device and a chip that slurps up sperm, men can easily and cheaply measure the count and motility of their swimmers . The test is about 98 percent accurate, takes less than five seconds, and requires no training to run, Harvard researchers report Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine . It’s also cheap—the device and the microfluidic chip cost just $4.45 total to manufacture. Researchers are hopeful that the invention will help couples trying to have children—as well as those trying not to. Worldwide, it's estimated that more than 30 million men face fertility issues at some point.