Hackaday
6 hours
There's something to be said for economies of scale and few things sell more than cell phones. Maybe that's why [NODE] took inspiration from an iPhone slide out keyboard case to create this Pi Zero W-based portable terminal . This is actually his third iteration, and in the video below he explains why he has built the new version. By housing the custom bits in a 3D-printed frame that is size compatible with the iPhone, [NODE] manages to leverage the slick slide out keyboard cases available for the phone. The iPhone in question is an older iPhone 5, so the cases are inexpensive, compared to the latest generation. On the other hand, the iPhone 5 is recent enough that it should be hard to find a compatible case. The circuitry itself is pretty straightforward: a battery, a charge controller, and an LCD display. The only complaint we could see was the lack of a control key on the keyboard.
SPACE.com
6 hours
South China Morning Post
a day
Virtual reality isnt confined to the realms of video gaming and film. Artists now have the tools to create works of art that viewers can literally put themselves in and explore. Google has developed a virtual reality app called Tilt Brush. A user, wearing a VR headset, holds joysticks one in each hand, one for painting, the other to switch to different colours and functions in order to paint and draw in 3D. For this weeks Art Basel Hong Kong, fair organisers and Google...
Sputnik International
2 days
Hackaday
4 days
It seems [Pete Prodoehl] was working on a project that involved counting baseballs as they fell out of a chute, with the counting part being sensed by a long lever microswitch. Now we all know there are a number of different ways in which one can do this using all kinds of fancy sensors. But for [Pete], we guess the microswitch was what floated his boat likely because it was cheap, easily available and replaceable, and reliable. Well, the reliable part he wasn't very sure about, so he built a (not quite) Useless Machine that would conduct an endurance test on the specific switch brand and type he was using. But mostly, it seemed like an excuse to do some CAD design, 3D printing, wood work and other hacker stuff. The switches he's testing appear to be cheap knock-off's of a well known brand. Running them through the torture test on his Useless Machine, he found that the lever got deformed after a while, and would stop missing the actuator arms of his endurance tester completely.
Hackaday
4 days
Is [SpongeBob SquarePants] art? Opinions will differ, but there's little doubt about how cool it is to render a pixel-mapped time-lapse portrait of Bikini Bottom's most famous native son with a roving light painting robot . Inspired by the recent trend of long exposure pictures of light-adorned Roombas in darkened rooms, [Hacker House] decided to go one step beyond and make a lighted robot with less random navigational tendencies. A 3D-printed frame and wheels carries a pair of steppers and a Raspberry Pi. An 8×8 Neopixel matrix on top provides the light. The software is capable of rendering both simple vector images and rastering across a large surface to produce full-color images. You'll notice the careful coordination between movement and light in the video below, as well as the impressive turn-on-a-dime performance of the rover, both of which make the images produced so precise.
Hackaday
4 days
There are many things people do with spare rooms. Some make guest rooms, others make baby rooms, while a few even make craft rooms. What do hackers do with spare rooms? Turn them into giant 3D printers of course . [Torbjørn Ludvigsen] is a physics major out of Umea University in Sweden, and built the Hangprinter for only $250 in parts. It follows the RepRap tradition of being completely open source and made mostly from parts that it can print. The printer is fully functional, proven by printing a five-foot tall model of the Tower of Babel. [Torbjorn] hopes to improve the printer to allow it to print pieces of furniture and other larger household items. [Torbjorn] hopes that 3D printing will not go down the same road that 2D printing went, where the printers are designed to break after so many prints. Open source is the key to stopping such machines from getting out there. Thanks to [Jeremy Southard] for the tip! Filed under: 3d Printer hacks
TechCrunch
4 days
TEDTalks (video)
4 days
Wired
4 days
The Event Chronicle
4 days
By Rich Fiori A hologram according to Webster is “a three-dimensional image reproduced from a pattern of interference produced by a split coherent beam of radiation (laser)”. There are several components to the creation of a hologram . The first component is the object to be reproduced. The second component is the “split beam of radiation”. The third component is the mirror setup. The fourth component is the“pattern of interference”. And the fifth component is the holographic plate or film. Together they compose a holographic image on the holographic plate or film. The wave characteristic of light is essential to the creation of a hologram. A hologram is a photograph that does not use a lens and records both the phase and the amplitude of the images. Upon viewing, this technique provides us with a 3D image using a 2Dlens-less photo”. Phase in this context is based on the wave properties of light.
Bournemouth Daily Echo
4 days
WEDDING couples will be able to relive their big day in 3D and share it with loved ones thanks to 360-degree videos.
Ruptly TV
5 days
Autocar
6 days
The new TVR uses Gordon Murray’s patentediStream Carbonproduction process which uses a tubular structure to define the hard points of the car, with bonded-in carbon fibre panels greatly enhancing its strength. The rigidity, lightness and crashworthiness of iStream have already been proven in a number of applications, including Murray’s own micro-cars, two Japanese sports car projects and a flat-pack truck design for developing world applications called Ox. At the Guildford meetings, customers are also seeing a 3D portrayal of the TVR’s completed interior — in two different colour/trim combinations — plus a model of TVR’s unique in-house seat design. Proceedings conclude with a discussion of finance options, then a Q&A. The whole thing occupies a little less than two hours. Over the past year, TVR has been conducting extensive performance and durability tests of its Cosworth-developed, Mustang-derived 5.
Hackaday
7 days
When we think of an Electric Arc Furnace (EAF), the image that comes to mind is one of a huge machine devouring megawatts of electricity while turning recycled metal into liquid. [Gregory Hildstrom] did some work to shrink one of those machines down to a practical home version . [Greg] is building on work done by [Grant Thompson], aka “The King of Random” and AvE . Industrial EAFs are computer controlled devices, carefully lowering a consumable carbon electrode into the steel melt. This machine brings those features to the home gamer. [Greg] started by TIG welding up an aluminum frame. There isn't a whole lot of force on the Z-axis of the arc furnace, so he used a stepper and lead screw arrangement similar to those used in 3D printers. An Adafruit stepper motor shield sits on an Arduino Uno to control the beast. The Arduino reads the voltage across the arc and adjusts the electrode height accordingly.
Hackaday
7 days
Sure, you're getting further and further into the game and finishing missions, but the true progress for a zombie shooter is how many zombies you've killed, right? [Evan Juras] agreed, so he set off to build a hardware stat tracker for Left4Dead 2 ! Left4Dead 2 tracks a bunch of stats and at the end of each level, those stats are updated on your Steam page. [Evan] used a Python script running on a Raspberry Pi to connect to the internet and grab four different stats from your Steam profile. Those stats are displayed on an RGB 16×2 display. To house the project, a case for it was designed and [Evan] had it 3D printed. There are two buttons on the case: one to update the stats and another to cycle through them. If no buttons are pressed then the display cycles through the stats every minute and updates the stats every 24 hours. The video below shows a summary of the build process and describes the hardware and software used.
Daily Mail - Science
7 days
A team of scientists from University College Cork put cheese through its paces to test out the effects of 3D printing on its micro-structure, resulting in a softer, springier and more fluid cheese.
Mashable
7 days
Sonic the Hedgehog appears to be running headlong into the apocalypse in the first gameplay footage of the upcoming Sonic game, Sonic Forces . As the speedy blue hedgehog dashes through the gritty environment above, a few analogies come to mind. Is Sonic running through a representation of the United States in its current era? Is Sonic running through the burning ruins of its own modern 3D game legacy, signifying an acknowledgment of past mistakes and a race toward a brighter future? Maybe the Sonic series is just going for something a bit grittier Because that worked so well last time . Read more... More about Gaming , Gameplay , Sega , Sonic The Hedgehog , and Entertainment
Hackaday
7 days
This was combined with some software written in Processing that assigned macros to each button. This was a sufficient solution, but the switches in the Adafruit trellis look squishy. These are not the right switches for someone who craves a soft snap under every fingertip. It's not the keyboard of someone who desires the subtle thickness of laser etched PBT keycaps. The Adafruit keypad doesn't have the graceful lines of a fully sculpted set of keycaps. Oh my god, it's doubleshot. [Robin]'s completed keyboard has gone through a few revisions, but in the end, he settled on PCB-mounted switches and a very clever 3D printed standoff system to hold an Arduino Pro Micro in place. The enclosure, too, is 3D printed, and the end result is a completely custom keyboard that's perfect for mashing key combos. You can check out a video of this keyboard in action below. Filed under: Arduino Hacks , peripherals hacks
Hackaday
7 days
We've had our eye on [Greg Zumwalt]. He's been working on some very clever 3D-printed mechanisms and his latest prototype is an air engine for a toy car . You can supply the air for the single cylinder with a compressor, or by blowing into it, but attaching an inflated balloon makes the system self-contained. Last week we saw the prototype of the engine by itself, and wondered if this had enough power to drive a little train engine. We were almost right as here it is powering the front wheels of a little car. This isn't [Greg's] first rodeo. He's been working on self-contained locomotion for a while now. Shown here is his spring-driven car which you pull backwards to load the spring. It's a common feature in toys, and very neat to see with the included 3D-printed spring hidden inside of the widest gear. That print looks spectacular, but the balloon-powered prototype tickles our fancy quite a bit more.
Techradar
8 days
Bendable, flexible touchscreens have been in development for what seems like years now. Every time CES rolls around, it feels like there's a new rumor that a smartphone manufacturer is building one. This year, it's the turn of Samsung, with a purported 'Galaxy X' phone-sized device that can fold out to the size of a tablet . A prototype is supposedly in the works, due to be finished by the third quarter of 2017. But the technology is maturing. Engineers at the University of British Columbia have developed an inexpensive sensor that is capable of detecting different kinds of touch even when stretched, folded or bent. One compact package "There are sensors that can detect pressure, such as the iPhone's 3D Touch, and some that can detect a hovering finger, like Samsungs AirView. There are also sensors that are foldable, transparent and stretchable," said Mirza Saquib Sarwar, a PhD student in electrical and computer engineering at UBC.
Hackaday
8 days
[FESTO] keeps coming up with new tricks that make us both envious and inspired. Take their bionicANTs for example. Watching a group of them cooperate to move objects around looks so real that you're instantly reminded of the pests crawling across your floor, but looking at them up close they're a treasure trove of ideas for your next robot project. Ant exoskeleton as circuit board The exoskeleton is 3D printed but they then use the outer surface of that exoskeleton as a circuit board for much of the circuitry. The wiring is painted on using a 3D MID (Molded Interconnect Device) process. While FESTO didn't give specifics about their process, a little research shows that 3D MID involves the 3D printed object being made of a special non-conductive metal material, a laser then drawing the traces in the material, and then dipping the object in various baths to apply copper, nickel and gold layers.
Natural Blaze
9 days
By Heather Callaghan, Editor 3D-printing is doing everything now: from the best ever casts for broken limbs, gardens, living body parts(!) to printing any color of cosmetics on demand. Still, it’s...
TechCrunch
9 days
The chips in our devices are powered by transistors and circuits so small that they can barely be detected by our most advanced imaging techniques. How chip makers manage to do quality control when they cant even see what theyre working is a really good question. A new method from Swiss researchers provides an incredibly detailed look at details on the level of nanometers Read More