Tom's Hardware UK
16 hours
Core77
19 hours
You wouldn't suspect a comedian and former talk show host would be an early adopter of 3D printing. But regular viewers of " Jay Leno's Garage " know that for years, Leno has been using a 3D printer to help keep his collection of 286 rare vehicles up and running. While he can buy over-the-shelf parts for his McLaren P1 and Audi R8 Spyder, replacement items for his for his 1963 Chrysler Turbine concept car or one of his 1930s Duesenbergs are impossible to come by. That's why Leno has had engineer and former jet engine technician Bernard Juchli, his shop manager, scan old parts in need of replacement, 3D print them on-site in plastic, then send the plastic part to a foundry. The plastic is sacrificed to make a mold, and the replacement part is then cast. Recently Leno has learned of a more efficient method. Here he brings in Bry Ewan, a rep from Stratasys' Direct Manufacturing offshoot (think Kinko's for all things digital fabrication) to explain how their Direct Metal Laser Sintering process is right up Leno and Juchli's alley.
Variety
2 days
Google has brought its Tilt Brush virtual reality drawing app to the Oculus Rift VR headset. The launch isnt just big news for Rift owners, its also the first time Google has officially supported any of Facebooks VR platforms. Tilt Brush is a 3D drawing app that allows users to step inside their creations and illustrate... Read more »
Core77
2 days
Artist Raphael Vangelis has given our familiar and increasingly rare digital waiting signals a hands-on portrait. His animated short "Analogue Loaders" takes on several ubiquitous symbols for loading and injects them into IRL environments using stop motion. Seen in a new locale some might take a moment to identify, and then several more moments to figure out how he managed them with practical effects. Between 3D printing and painstaking sculptural detail he rendered the aggravating icons with a care that might shift how you look at them in the future. Well maybe not, but you might have time to while you're waiting. Analogue Loaders from Raphael Vangelis on Vimeo . His behind the scenes video is equally fun and impressive. If this labor of love doesn't remind you to be grateful for the engineers (physical and otherwise) behind your spinning wheels and mid-typing icons, I don't know what will. Analogue Loaders Behind The Scenes from Raphael Vangelis on Vimeo .
Windows Blog
2 days
As a member of the Microsoft HoloLens product and engineering team, I get to see some pretty cool things on a regular basis. Any day of the week, I have a front-row seat to see how our teams, customers, and partners are making a world where mixed reality changes the way we live, work, play, and learn. I’m consistently amazed by the creative ways HoloLens is being used to solve complex problems, improve business outcomes and results, and change the way we interact with technology. Today, I have the privilege of sharing with you one of the latest examples of HoloLens innovation that is happening, this time within the healthcare sector. The operating room as it exists today Stryker, a leading global medical technology company, has set out to improve the process for designing operating rooms for hospitals and surgery centers. You may not be aware of it, but surgical disciplines from general, to urologic, orthopedic, cardiac, and ear nose and throat (ENT) use shared operating rooms.
Techradar
2 days
Weve already seen IKEA successfully use VR as a platform for kitchen decoration planning. Now Samsung is expanding on that with VuildUs, a program that will enable users to see what a new piece of furniture would look like to scale in their home before they buy, negating the need to measure every part of your home before redecorating. VuildUs uses a 360-degree depth camera and a mobile app for VR headsets. Users scan their home using the camera and transfer the data to the mobile app where its used to build a VR version of their home. This will allow the user to pop on their VR headset and enter a virtual version of their home where theyll be able to view items of furniture in 3D, and even buy immediately if theyre happy with it. TraVRer is a 360-degree video platform thats intended to give users a peek at a prospective holiday before they go, or even after they come home if theyd like to reminisce.
Make:
3 days
Haven't you ever wanted to shoot your clock? Read more on MAKE The post Hit Snooze by Shooting This Alarm Clock with Nerf Darts appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers .
I4U News
3 days
The ONO Smartphone 3D printer (formerly known as OLO) was the first ever Kickstarter campaign I have joined. After some delays the $99 ONO 3D printer is about to shop. The team behind ONO promises...
Hackaday
3 days
No matter what the project is about, we're always suckers for nicely integrated builds with good fit and finish. There's a certain appeal to rat's nest wiring on a breadboard, and such projects are valuable because they push the limits. But eventually you need to go from prototype to product, and that's where this IKEA window shade automation project shines. Integration is more than just putting everything in a nice box, especially for home automation gear it really needs to blend. [ehsmaes] roller blind motorization project accomplishes that nicely with a 3D-printed case for the electronics, as well as a custom case for the geared stepper motor to drive the shade. The drive replaces the standard spring-loaded cap on the end of the IKEA Tupplur shade, and the neutral color of both cases blends nicely with the shade and surroundings. The control electronics include a NodeMCU and a motor shield; [eshmaes] warns that narrow shades work just fine off of USB power, but that wider windows will need a power boost.
AFP News Agency
3 days
Hackaday
4 days
Nespresso fans rejoice! If you like coffee (of course you do) and are a Nespresso fan, chances are you are one of two types of persons: the ones that chosen one type of capsule and stick to it or the ones that have a jar full of mixed capsules and lost track which coffee is which. Of course, there is a third, rarer, OCDish, kind. The ones that have every capsule organized neatly by color in a proper holder, full of style. In any case, if you forgot which color is which coffee because you threw the case away and forgot about it here's an interesting weekend project for you: the Nespresso Capsule Detector . [circuit.io team] made a neat Arduino-based project that can detect which capsule is which using an RGB color detector and display information about it on an LCD display. It's a pretty simple project to make. If you have a 3D printer you can print the case, if not it's fairly easy to come up with a working casing for the electronics and capsule.
MacRumors
4 days
MacRumors
4 days
Hackaday
5 days
The Pola' in the PolaPi is a giveaway for what this Hackaday.io project is. This polaroid-like camera , created by [Muth], is a sort of black and white, blast from the past mixed with modern 3D printing. It is based on a Raspberry-pi Zero with a camera module, a Sharp memory LCD for viewing the image, and a Nano thermal printer to print the actual photo. Throw in some buttons, a battery and a slick 3D printed case and you have your own PolaPi. Right now it's already on the second iteration as [Muth]s gave the first prototype to some lucky person. As he had to rebuild the whole camera from scratch, he took advantage of what he learned in the first prototype and improved on it. The camera has a live' 20fps rate on the LCD and you can take your photo, review it, and if you like the shot, print it. The printed photo is surprisingly good, check it out in the video after the break.
Hackaday
5 days
One of the essential problems of bio-robotics is actuators. The rotors, bearings, and electrical elements of the stepper motors and other electromechanical drives we generally turn to for robotics projects are not really happy in living systems. But building actuators the way nature does it from muscle tissue opens up a host of applications. That's where this complete how-to guide on building and controlling muscle-powered machines comes in. Coming out of the [Rashid Bashir] lab at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Campaign, the underlying principles are simple, which of course is the key to their power. The technique involves growing rings of muscle tissue in culture using 3D-printed hydrogel as forms. The grown muscle rings are fitted on another 3D-printed structure, this one a skeleton with stiff legs on a flexible backbone.
Core77
5 days
Core77
6 days
Core77
6 days
The Points Guy
6 days
Digital Trends
6 days
Tech learning company Adafruit has a new tutorial -- and it's all about getting the perfect light for smartphone shots. This DIY project is not for the faint of heart, however. The post Build a smartphone ring light with a 3D printer and $60 in parts appeared first on Digital Trends .
Hackaday
6 days
Exploiting the flexibility of plastic, a group of researchers has created a 3D printable microscope with sub-micron accuracy . By bending the supports of the microscope stage, they can manipulate a sample with surprising precision. Coupled with commonly available M3 bolts and stepper motors with gear reduction, they have reported a precision of up to 50nm in translational movement. We've seen functionality derived from flexibility before but not at this scale. And while it's not a scanning electron microscope , 50nm is the size of a small virus (no, not that kind of virus ). OpenFlexure has a viewing area of 8x8x4mm, which is impressive when the supports only flex 6°. But, if 256 mm 3 isn't enough for you, fret not: the designs are all Open Source and are modeled in OpenSCAD just begging for modification. With only one file for printing, no support material, a wonderful assembly guide and a focus on PLA and ABS, OpenFlexure is clearly designed for ease of manufacturing.
Tom's Hardware UK
6 days
Magic Leap, the secretive MR startup with a sky-high valuation, is acquiring 3D scanning software company Dacuda. Or at least, parts of it.
Techradar - Reviews
6 days
We're just glad Microsoft bit the bullet and put a 3D-enabled Blu-Ray drive in its system. The Xbox One also plays CDs, something the PlayStation 4 currently doesn't do. Still, can the Xbox One really handle the potentially backbreaking load of the living room? OneGuide and HDMI-in If you're in North America , the Xbox One can integrate your cable or satellite feed thanks to an HDMI-in port. Anyone who's had cable installed in their home probably shudders at the thought of fooling with that precarious mix of coaxial and HDMI, but fear not, setting it up is easier than finding your cable company's service number. After connecting your cable box to the Xbox One via HDMI there's a setup wizard to take you through all the steps. All you need to know is your service provider and zip code. Punch that in and the Xbox does the rest. The result is the OneGuide, live TV on your game console organized a lot like your cable's built-in menu.
PressTV News
6 days